Contact Us
Want to advertise here? Contact us today to begin

How Aspirin Can Help Your Garden.

Discussion in 'Cannabis Infirmary' started by ShroomKing, Mar 22, 2016.

  1. ShroomKing

    ShroomKing Best of luck. Peace

    3,129
    10,283
    263
    "Take two aspirin and call me in the morning."

    We've all heard that advice from doctors. And moms have been dispensing this all-purpose cure-all to their families as a standard way of providing relief from headaches and sniffles, muscle aches and joint pain.

    Then it should be no surprise to learn how an important aspirin ingredient--salicylic acid--is being used as an Earth-friendly first aid for warding off plant diseases.

    Meet Martha McBurney, the master gardener in charge of the demonstration vegetable garden at the University of Rhode Island. In the summer of 2005 she tested aspirin water on tomatoes, cucumbers, beans, basil and other plants after reading about it in a gardening publication called the Avant Gardener (PO Box 489, New York, NY 10028). The results were well, astonishing...

    "What caught my eye in the original Avant Gardener article was it said that aspirin is an activator of Systemic Acquired Resistance (SAR). And that plants, when under stress, naturally produce salicylic acid, but not fast enough and in sufficient quantities to really help them out in time. So the bugs get them, and diseases get them, and they show even more stress.

    "But if you give them aspirin, it helps boost their immune system, kind of like feeding people echinacea so they don't get a cold.

    How much, and how often

    The dosage that Martha used was 1.5 [uncoated] aspirins to 2 gallons of water. She also added 2 tablespoons of yucca extract to help the aspirin water stick to the leaves better. (The yucca extract can be substituted with a mild liquid soap.) Martha explained that the yucca (or soap) prevents the aspirin water from beading up and rolling off leaves of broccoli and kale leaves. Finally, she sprayed the plants every 3 weeks.

    The summer when Martha first started testing aspirin water, was not the best, weather-wise. It was cool, rainy and damp. "But what happened was, by the end of the season, the plants in the raised beds with the aspirin water looked like they were on steroids!​

    "The plants were huge, and green and with no insects. We even saw some disease problems that reversed themselves. We think we got a virus on the cucumbers, and they aspirin water seemed to reverse it. The cucumbers ended up being very healthy."

    Aspirin improves seed germination

    Martha also sprayed the aspirin water on the seeds they directly sowed in the ground. The result, they discovered was 100 percent seed germination, compared to spotty germination in the other trial beds.

    Scientists at the University of Arizona and with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), curious about findings such as what Martha experienced, are studying how salicylic acid prods plants into releasing their natural defenses against harmful fungi, bacteria and viruses. According to an article by Dean Fosdick of the Associated Press, "They envision it as a commercially viable alternative to synthetic pesticides in a natural way to extend the life of susceptible yet popular crops."

    Is it organic? Well, not really. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is 'derived' from the white willow tree, Salix alba. Studies are now being conducted on plants using pure willow extracts to compare the effects to aspirin.

    [​IMG]

    Cut flowers that last forever?

    Well, not quite. But current research may explain a modern-old wives' tale of adding an aspirin to a vase of cut flower to keep the blooms fresh longer. Here's the explanation: The cutting of flowers is perceived by the plant as a wound, and so it stimulates the production of a substance that not only helps the plant fight off bugs, but also hastens aging or wilting, such as in the case of a cut flower.​

    Aspirin halts the formation of the substance, which in turn, keeps the flowers looking young and not wilting prematurely. (For more helpful tips about keeping cut flowers looking fresh, naturally, clickhere).

    Scientists laughed, at first

    Plants weren't the only things affected by the aspirin water. At first, scientists at the University of Rhode Island gave Martha a bad time about her experiments. Teased her, mostly. But by the end of the summer, they were so impressed that they are now conducting their own formal investigations.

    [​IMG]

    "I've recommended it to just about everybody. The people who've tried it, that is, people who grow from oats to orchids, have found that plants do remarkably better when given small amounts of aspirin water. I've tried it on my houseplants, and it does really well. Plants are more vigorous and I'm having fewer problems with aphids and the typical things that can build up on houseplants over the winter."

    "Uh, Martha," I broke in. "My husband is losing his hair. Maybe I should try aspirin water."

    Martha didn't miss a beat. "Well, hey, you could give it a go!"

    So the next time your plant is looking a little feverish or flushed, consider reaching for some aspirin for treating what ails it.

    Meanwhile, keep your hands in the dirt, and your dreams on a star.

    [​IMG]

    Personally I use (1) 325mg Bayer Tablets ,crushed , per gallon of water, a few times in veg and once in the beginning of flower. I water it into my soil. You can water it in with your regular nutes , and it causes no pH shift.

    I have seen ,first hand, the positive side of aspirin.

    Do YOU use aspirin in your garden?
    If so , how much, when , and how ?
     
    DrFIRE617, Samoan, OldPine and 23 others like this.
  2. Up till now I thought that the aspirin thing was a bunch. Now my Mexican neighbor who tends both my gardens when I am away. Wellllllll guess what he has been adding it when he dose my plants. He said he see some things and just added to the reservoir, two days before the change out.
    He said that he felt that it gets them to jump out of a not growing good time. His family garden is not much bigger than mine but produces more than mine and his melons are outstanding. For the girls he says that when you clone and older plant and the leaves turn yellowish now is the time for a spray of cal-mag and aspirin. His English is what my kids have taught him over the years. He said he reads seamaiden some of her words take much time in dictionary but, she knows. Love it! I will now look into this seriously.
     
  3. I don't but, it sounds like it would be worth a try. We bear a remarkable amount in common, this plant and we.
    Although some aspirin isn't going to make any of us look like we're on steroids.
     
    william76, MGRox, Midwestjay and 5 others like this.
  4. Aloe and willow shoots for salicylic acid in organics sirs and yes, i have been on that train shroomking, nice thread.
     
  5. kolah

    kolah

    4,841
    8,200
    263
    I think aspirin was (or still is) derived from white willow bark. If this is true I wonder how beneficial white willow bark would be in comparison to aspirin.

    I also know for a fact that white willow is beneficial for rooting clones
     
    Budjunkie, Samoan, ShroomKing and 8 others like this.
  6. mancdank

    mancdank

    8,102
    19,576
    313
    Awesome post bro :)
     
  7. mancdank

    mancdank

    8,102
    19,576
    313
    I'm due for taking some more cuts. im guna try this on a tray and run it at the side of a tray with my usual method see how it goes I will post my reports if any 1 is interested :)
     
    dilligaf, william76, MGRox and 3 others like this.
  8. Natural

    Natural

    2,545
    4,407
    263
    great article..I've done a foliar before with around 500 mg to a gallon to see what it would do (a little above the recommended stated here, but I have generic walgreen with 'light coating' and some fell out). The plants perked up big time and the leaves were pointing hard. In my mind I've been weighing whether or not to use insect frass or aspirin. I'm not in love with the possible contaminants in frass.
     
    Samoan, MGRox, Theassbandit and 4 others like this.
  9. ShroomKing

    ShroomKing Best of luck. Peace

    3,129
    10,283
    263
    I've never used it as a foliar. But I think I might try a bit on a few beat up clones, just to see if the effect is immediate.
     
  10. mancdank

    mancdank

    8,102
    19,576
    313
    It's defo worth a go we would still be in the stone age without it lol :)
     
  11. Natural

    Natural

    2,545
    4,407
    263
    good point..root drench and foliar should work just the same..time for some experimenting
     
  12. It's not immediate, but before you get ready to transplant. The best part is the new growth is nice. I hate to admit that some of my magic isn't really mine.

    If you take no chances in life your life will be dull and one directional.

    You only become old and useless when you stop asken why and say ya.
     
    william76, ShroomKing and mancdank like this.
  13. Why not? Will try it on a few and see how it works. It wont be scientific, due to the fact they aren't all clones from the same mother, however, I know my plants and will be able to tell if there is a difference. Thanks for the post my friend.
     
  14. Please do not forget! I'm way down. Aloe and water soaked works fast for me than clonex. Keep us updated good sir @mancdank
     
  15. Limonene

    Limonene

    7,047
    26,350
    313
    Viagra, the popular drug that helps give men erections, could save plants from even more serious cases of droop. The most startling proof of Viagra's power over plants came from an Israeli scientist, Ya'acov Leshem, at Bar-Ilan University, who was looking at how flowers wither.
    He had a hunch that Viagra might work the same magic on plants so he put some into a vase of cut flowers and found they stayed fresh and perky for up to a week longer than usual. Just 2% of the dose needed to treat a bout of male impotence brought a new lease of life to roses, carnations and African daisies.

    "The flowers looked much fresher, their colour remained longer, and they were also much more turgid," reported Leshem. No one is suggesting spraying Viagra over plants to stave off wilt: there could be embarrassing side-effects and the cost would be prohibitive, but there might be cheaper and safer alternatives.

    When you delve into how Viagra works, you find a remarkably similar chemical story in plants and people. "Plants share the same common denominator as humans - nitric oxide," explains Leshem. This simple, colourless gas has long had a bad reputation for causing traffic pollution, but nitric oxide is now recognised as a powerful hormone in humans. When released from nerve endings, it tells blood vessels to relax and widen to increase blood flow - which is how it gets a phallus erect.

    Leshem found that plants naturally give off nitric oxide and, with Ron Wills, from the University of Newcastle in Australia, he fumigated 40 species of flowers, fruit and vegetables with the gas.

    "The results were astonishing. Anything from five to 12 hours' treatment with nitric oxide could more than double the shelf life of some species," says Leshem. Strawberries were especially amenable, although thick-skinned fruits such as oranges were untreatable. It also breathed new life into bags of prepared salads, often the saddest items on supermarket shelves.

    Advertisement
    Nitric oxide could do big things for the food and flower industries. "It is cheap and plentiful, with no identifiable side effects at the very low concentrations we use," Leshem says. However, there is reluctance to using it. Thirty years ago, it was classified as a toxic gas at much higher concentrations. Now we know that plants and animals make their own nitric oxide, attitudes need changing, argues Leshem.

    Nitric oxide might also be used to fight crop diseases. "We've discovered that plants use nitric oxide much as animals do, to turn on their immune system," says Daniel Klessig at Rutgers University, New Jersey. Klessig found that at the first hint of infection, a plant launches a nitric oxide attack, telling the cells at the infection site to commit suicide and kill off the invader, then warn the entire plant to defend itself.

    The gas also comes to the rescue of plants wilting in drought. Steven Neill, at the University of West England in Bristol, gave plants a whiff of nitric oxide and found they squeezed shut their tiny leaf pores, stopping their water supplies from evaporating. He's now trying out Viagra and expects to boost the nitric oxide effect. "I don't think Viagra will be a panacea for drought plants," he says, "but spraying crops with products that can make nitric oxide might be sensible."

    Saving a plant from the droop may not be as sexy as rescuing an erection, but its repercussions could be far more awesome. It has been estimated that 65% of the Earth's water supplies pass through plant stomata at some time. "Global water shortage is going to be a big environmental problem this century, so anything that improves water efficiency in plants is attractive," says Neill. Which just goes to show how Viagra and its nitric oxide buddy give plants a huge lift.
     
    Pegskiing, BombBP, munchiex and 6 others like this.
  16. Natural

    Natural

    2,545
    4,407
    263
    lmao..viagra

    I guess one thing to consider is that the use of jasmonates has been known to lower trich production. I'm not sure if salicyclic acid will have the same effect. A controlled experiment would need to be done. I'm going to assume the worst and use it as a sar inducer in veg state and not 'over-do' it.
     
    UgrewWHAT, superjet, MGRox and 3 others like this.
  17. mancdank

    mancdank

    8,102
    19,576
    313
    Been out to the shop this morning to get the bits I need for making 2 small batches :)
     
    Theassbandit and ShroomKing like this.
  18. This is to funny. On the 14th I gave all my ladies some aspirin and food for the first time. I didn't notice any change but every body is happy. I took clones yesterday I think I will add some aspirin to the top off food I use.
     
    MGRox, Theassbandit and ShroomKing like this.
  19. ShroomKing

    ShroomKing Best of luck. Peace

    3,129
    10,283
    263
    Good point. ..
    I stop using it at 2nd week of bloom. Personally.
     
    Natural, MGRox and Herb Forester like this.
  20. Someone call the OMMP quick, they'll need to require another expensive lab test for Viagra residue.
     
    UgrewWHAT, MGRox and Limonene like this.