2021- Best Cobs on Market

  • Thread starter PiffinOut
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PiffinOut

PiffinOut

Figured we are in a new year which means new product upgrades. So, what are the best cobs on the market this year for the average DIYer?
I heard about the Citizen CLUs, the Crees (CXB3590, CXB3070) , the Luminous (CXM22), the Vero 29s etc. But I am having a hard time finding a dedicated forum page for finding the best options out this year.
Best spectrum-

Most efficient-

Most cost effective-

Best value (cost benefit analysis)-

I personally was looking at the Luminous CXM22s, but Im unfamiliar with the general options and dont want to fire the gun without knowing the general consesus. My past experience with LED lights was limited to planted tanks and reef tanks, this is a new frontier for me and I feel very lacking.

So please, anyone with knowledge, feel free to get me and other newbs up to speed.

Id prefer not to have this discussion get into QBs or prebuilt kits, but rather focus on the various COB bulbs themselves for the average person who may or may not be weighin options for a DIY build. I wouldve added a poll but I am sure I am missing other options and wouldnt want to exclude them. Im sure this post will bring up an exhaustive list of all the ones used in indoor horticulture to the point another post could list an all-inclusive poll.
Thanks for any and all input and ofcourse,
Happy growing!!!
 
Homesteader

Homesteader

I have only used Cree 3590's for builds and even then only a few lights. They have become a lot cheaper then they used to be though and pack a large amount of light for the price. There are so many options though. I'm sure all the COBs are going to be kinda similar as long as you aren't running and pushing them too much. Some probably can withstand much more than others though. Osram has a bunch too but I am unfamiliar with them. You could probably get custom shape COBs if you looked around.
 
gorillaglueaaron

gorillaglueaaron

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I think that no matter how good cobs get, they'll never be as good as strips. And at the moment the best strips might be the lm301h sl strips (in terms of both efficiency and spectrum).
 
MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

I think that no matter how good cobs get, they'll never be as good as strips. And at the moment the best strips might be the lm301h sl strips (in terms of both efficiency and spectrum).


timber lighting still disagrees and only offers strip lights for low ceiling height or vertical racks. Cobs still rule for trees.


The answer is to pick the right tool for the job. Not parrot the current marketing.
 
gorillaglueaaron

gorillaglueaaron

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Strips are essentially the same thing as COBs just laid out differently and only capable of mid range power. The spectrum can be changed with both depending on the phosphor coat. Efficiency is relative. The most efficient light is pretty dark.
On strips, the diodes are more spread out so they are easier to cool and are therefore more efficient.
 
gorillaglueaaron

gorillaglueaaron

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timber lighting still disagrees and only offers strip lights for low ceiling height or vertical racks. Cobs still rule for trees.


The answer is to pick the right tool for the job. Not parrot the current marketing.
I agree that you should pick the right tool for the job. I just don't see when cobs would be that tool. They undisputedly have worse coverage and efficiency.
 
MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

I agree that you should pick the right tool for the job. I just don't see when cobs would be that tool. They undisputedly have worse coverage and efficiency.

they have much better penetration. They would work much better for my style of growing spaced out bushes. We dont all want to scrog and defoliate.

The difference in efficiency is minor. You pick a lamp depending on your space and needs.
 
gorillaglueaaron

gorillaglueaaron

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Supporter
i dont doubt there is a minor difference but it doesnt apply to the minor difference in layout of diodes. And it sure doesnt matter to the plants.

Even the difference between the old samsung diodes and new ones is very minor to final results.
It's the difference between 950 and 1000 ppfd. I'd take the 1000 with better coverage any day.
 
gorillaglueaaron

gorillaglueaaron

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better remove all the lowers and start spreading out your colas. ;-)


but seriously you are way overthinking this. 50 ppf is not going to matter over gardening skills.
That's just from the temperature difference. The coverage is also a factor. Without good coverage, you could have a super bright light but not be able to use all of it because it would just burn the plants in the middle.
 
MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

That's just from the temperature difference. The coverage is also a factor. Without good coverage, you could have a super bright light but not be able to use all of it because it would just burn the plants in the middle.

no just more marketing. My hps plants dont burn in the middle. The differences are extremely minor. And strip lights lost a bit of max ppfd compared to boards and cobs. Everything is a trade off. The only answer is right tool for the job. Would you want huge strip lamps over your plants in a greenhouse or would you prefer proper greenhouse fixtures?
 
PiffinOut

PiffinOut

Just a side note that is unrelated to horticulture. Im finding the discussion bit on strips here to be somewhat entertaining, as they have been all the rage for planted/reef tanks for a few years now.
I think thats primarily due to strips producing very even and uniform light distribution within the tank which wont blind the fish or create hotspots for algae blooms. Some people use cree led spotlights for specific intensive centerpiece plants but for the most part everyone raves about strips for general light canopy coverage. In my brief research on this forum I was kinda suprised strips havent really made their way into the horticulture as much as they have in aquaculture but I figure that it was due to very different environments and general lighting requirements from being underwater.
In the aquatic community even PAR coverage and reflection area is everything, especially for reaching large background plants and carpeting foreground plants like dwarf hairgrass. Very energy intensive centerpiece plants like red tiger lilies usually get their own dedicated spotlight style fixture to keep the plant compact and encourage it to branch within a specified range.
 
MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

Just a side note that is unrelated to horticulture. Im finding the discussion bit on strips here to be somewhat entertaining, as they have been all the rage for planted/reef tanks for a few years now.
I think thats primarily due to strips producing very even and uniform light distribution within the tank which wont blind the fish or create hotspots for algae blooms. Some people use cree led spotlights for specific intensive centerpiece plants but for the most part everyone raves about strips for general light canopy coverage. In my brief research on this forum I was kinda suprised strips havent really made their way into the horticulture as much as they have in aquaculture but I figure that it was due to very different environments and general lighting requirements from being underwater.
In the aquatic community even PAR coverage and reflection area is everything, especially for reaching large background plants and carpeting foreground plants like dwarf hairgrass. Very energy intensive centerpiece plants like red tiger lilies usually get their own dedicated spotlight style fixture to keep the plant compact and encourage it to branch within a specified range.

Gavita is selling a big strip lamp now. The hobby lighting market always seems to go from aquariums then grow lights.


remember when we got t-5 ho?
 
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