Aluminum And Color How To:??

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Kennedyfarm

Kennedyfarm

Hello everyone. We have been doing some testing on a few plants to see how aluminum effects color. Plants ability to make anthocynine is based on P.H and the amount of aluminum found in soils. (Not the only factor). We are also dropping some night time Temps below 55f to stop chlorophyll production. I'm looking for anyone who also has experience with this. I'm currently adding between .5 grams and 2 grams. Of aluminum sulphate. To 7 gallon pots. Using silicon to move aluminum around the plant.

Please don't tell me how aluminum will give me alzheimers... this is simply testing for coloration... we can always send the samples for testing to make sure it's safe, also note aluminum OXIDE. Your more likely to get harmed from a baked potato. (Actually a steamed potato if you wrap it in foil) I have some info from hydrangeas but nothing other then that. We are having positive results with anything above 1.5g during the last 3 weeks. After everything has filled out. We also flush for 12+ days. And often leave a plant to "die" just to see where she ends up. Eventually we will get some proper data on the subject for everyone. Thanks for reading. Kennedy Family farm.
 
Kennedyfarm

Kennedyfarm

My cmh and temps bring out all kinds of colors. And my autumning off tek.
Hey everyone, I'm also using these methods. I'm looking for anyone who has some experience with application rates and the use of silicon to remove after. This may be useful for someone doing outdoors without control on an auto. purely experimental here and not really a consumption product. As for the concern of most, we live in a world where everything is toxic and gives you cancer. Blueberries are treated with aluminum. So avoid those. If someone Can post their ten years of lab data on aluminum OXIDE. Not aluminum. I will be sending samples for a plant tissue test after the run to get a real view of aluminum oxide levels in both untreated and treated. Will update with real data. This is the advanced section right? :)
 
RippedTorn

RippedTorn

Who cares what it looks like. Does it hit like sandpaper? Pretty sure aluminum oxide is safe to inhale. Its very common in natural and industrial dust.

I know mersh growers would rather fool ignorant people with pretty looks, but still, how does it taste is a question being ignored way too much.
 
Kennedyfarm

Kennedyfarm

The company that is looking for these genetics is fully reimbursing me, I'm just following direction. Anyways... thanks rippedthorn for something positive. THIS information might be helpful for those of you looking to remove aluminum which you didn't know was present in the first place. Tea has around 8mg of aluminum per liter brewed... If anyone has data on aluminum in there untreated plants and removal solutions, I'd love to chat.

Yes demontrich. How do we remove it? And what level can we add it to. This is the same concept as all nutrients. Add them. Gain the effect. Remove them. I'll update this once I get real world data.

To clarify, aluminum is not being endorsed here. We are looking to REMOVE aluminum. And what levels it can be removed from. This could also be useful in testing soil for new crop locations. I'm just now learning some "organic" crops can be exceptionally high In aluminum.

Thanks as always for reading.
 
Kennedyfarm

Kennedyfarm

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5091896/

Thanks homesteader. I know amino acids such as glutamine and glycine have good chelating effects. From what I understand they will bind and mobilize the immobile nutrients in your plants. I think with a full regime of the silicon, calcium, and amino acids. The aluminum can be brought up and removed safely. It would be ideal if we could raise the aluminum levels and then bring them down PAST the amount found in organic outdoors. Only time will tell.
 
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MW7945

MW7945

Who cares what it looks like. Does it hit like sandpaper? Pretty sure aluminum oxide is safe to inhale. Its very common in natural and industrial dust.

I know mersh growers would rather fool ignorant people with pretty looks, but still, how does it taste is a question being ignored way too much.
Safe industrial dust you say... tell me more? You've piqued my interest
 
Kennedyfarm

Kennedyfarm

Why use alum at all? Maybe I am just confused but couldn't you use straight peat. Typically 4.5-5.5 pH.
It was purely experimental/ for fun... was just looking for someone to chat with on the subject.

Just in case it has become confusing. I am 1. Looking for levels of aluminum found in your cannabis. 2. Looking for ways you removed it. 3. The amount that can be present and removed. 4. Coloration effects if any...

Thanks.
 
xavier7995

xavier7995

Nothing useful to add, but it is an interesting topic, will watch. Seems like it could yield some interesting insights into the flush/finish, big picture I would think whatever could help get residual materials out of the plant would be good to know. Who knows, maybe there is a metal worker somewhere that grows weed next to his piles of shavings and accidentally has some fall into their soil, think about that guy, what's he gonna do, come here looking for answers that's what.
 
Homesteader

Homesteader

I think aluminum toxicity is more of a soil issue. I may be wrong but thought that aluminum effected the soil and roots and prevented them from being healthy.

The way you remove it from soil is with gypsum though usually coupled with an increase of pH by using lime.
 
Kennedyfarm

Kennedyfarm

Nothing useful to add, but it is an interesting topic, will watch. Seems like it could yield some interesting insights into the flush/finish, big picture I would think whatever could help get residual materials out of the plant would be good to know. Who knows, maybe there is a metal worker somewhere that grows weed next to his piles of shavings and accidentally has some fall into their soil, think about that guy, what's he gonna do, come here looking for answers that's what.
A friend of ours has a 12 ac farm. The land was used as an auto wrecker in the 70's and has a 64 nova buried in the back yard. The cars have all long been removed. But often you will find old drum brakes, windshield wipers, ect.. This is an example also. I know the simple answer, don't grow there. MOVE. But this is the advanced section. LOL the metal shavings made me think of our pipe fitter. :)
 
Kennedyfarm

Kennedyfarm

Aluminum is a trivalent cation found in its ionic form in most kinds of animal and plant tissues and in natural waters everywhere. [1] It is the third most prevalent element and the most abundant metal in the earth's crust, representing approximately 8% of total mineral components. [2] Due to its reactivity, aluminum in nature is found only in combination with other elements.

Dietary aluminum is ubiquitous but in such small quantities that it is not a significant source of concern in persons with normal elimination capacity. Urban water supplies may contain a greater concentration because water is usually treated with aluminum before becoming part of the supply. Subsequent purification processes that remove organic compounds take away many of the same compounds that bind the element in its free state, further increasing aluminum concentration.

All metals can cause disease through excess. In addition, essential metals can affect the human body in the case of deficiency or imbalance. [3]Malabsorption through diarrheal states can result in essential metal and trace element deficiencies. Toxic effects are dependent upon the amount of metal ingested, entry rate, tissue distribution, concentration achieved, and excretion rate. Mechanisms of toxicity include inhibition of enzyme activity and protein synthesis, alterations in nucleic acid function, and changes in cell membrane permeability.

No known physiologic need exists for aluminum; however, because of its atomic size and electric charge (0.051 nm and 3+, respectively), it is sometimes a competitive inhibitor of several essential elements with similar characteristics, such as magnesium (0.066 nm, 2+), calcium (0.099 nm, 2+), and iron (0.064 nm, 3+). At physiological pH, aluminum forms a barely soluble Al(OH)3 that can be easily dissolved by minor changes in the acidity of the media. [2]


Approximately 95% of an aluminum load becomes bound to transferrin and albumin intravascularly and is then eliminated renally. In healthy subjects, only 0.3% of orally administered aluminum is absorbed via the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and the kidneys effectively eliminate aluminum from the human body. Only when the GI barrier is bypassed, such as by intravenous infusion or in the presence of advanced renal dysfunction, does aluminum have the potential to accumulate. As an example, with intravenously infused aluminum. Aluminum accumulation is only a factor in unhealthy subjects.

- how do you like them apples :)
 
Kennedyfarm

Kennedyfarm

I also noticed the link between what pastor mentioned. Limestone contains all of the things aluminum can be a competitive inhibitor of. growers have been using Limestone for century's. Now onto the question of, is Limestone better then say aluminum sulphate due to the fact maybe these other competing inhibitors are found to be "working" together. To create Limestone. Maybe some testing in aluminum content VS limestone concentration is needed. Thanks pastor, you gave me something to look into. Maybe it is a more stable way for the plant to uptake and use aluminum... probably not but I will compare.
 
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