Anyone tried using Armor Si (or any Silica)?

Did you tried? Comparison A/B at the same time, not one harvest then try using it for another run?
I have only grown without silica additives for a very long time, producing extremely healthy plants. It is possible that an additive would improve things, but I've already been producing plants that are well above average, so I'm not going to chase a chimera. Given the fore knowledge that silica is literally already everywhere (perlite is 80% silica), I'm not inclined to chase a deficiency that is unlikely to exist for two reasons: the plants don't need it, and its already everywhere. When do we see pics of a plant that is hurting that is identified as a silica deficiency?

I googled this just now, to check myself, and find that a few species of plants indicate a desire for silica. It appears that some plants do accumulate silica, and do better with an additive. Cannabis is not mentioned among those, except by Maximum Yield, which I value just slightly above toilet paper as an information source.. The 40 years of experience I have indicates that omitting silica does not hurt my yields, plant health, or bud quality.

My opinion is that it's worth running an A/B test is worth while when there is a reasonable hypothesis to be tested. The a priori information isn't indicating that here, for me. The stated benefit of silica is stem strength, and I have no problems there. In the garden, or in the bedroom, LOL. ;-)
 
I hope your not slathering anything with Silica! :)
On a side note, aren't pistils made out of silica? Not that this has an effect on anything, just a fun fact I think I read somewhere.
No, they aren't. They are primarily carbon, like everything else in a plant.

And, yeah, I don't recommend silica lube. It hurts.
 
1) plants need vanishingly small amounts of silica
2) silica is the most abundant material on earth

Silica additives do one thing - separate you from your money.
Silica supplementation has been shown in some studies to enhance resistance to some sucking pests and fungi I believe, but you're right, SUPER small amounts are needed. I buy pure potassium silicate by the 500 ml bottle for like $9, and the same bottle has lasted me almost 2 years and I still have 1/4 bottle left. So it's not separating me from much money, but like many nutrients, there are some blatant rip offs out there. Silica is one, Carbs is another, cal-mag, I could go on.
 
I have only grown without silica additives for a very long time, producing extremely healthy plants. It is possible that an additive would improve things, but I've already been producing plants that are well above average, so I'm not going to chase a chimera. Given the fore knowledge that silica is literally already everywhere (perlite is 80% silica), I'm not inclined to chase a deficiency that is unlikely to exist for two reasons: the plants don't need it, and its already everywhere. When do we see pics of a plant that is hurting that is identified as a silica deficiency?

I googled this just now, to check myself, and find that a few species of plants indicate a desire for silica. It appears that some plants do accumulate silica, and do better with an additive. Cannabis is not mentioned among those, except by Maximum Yield, which I value just slightly above toilet paper as an information source.. The 40 years of experience I have indicates that omitting silica does not hurt my yields, plant health, or bud quality.

My opinion is that it's worth running an A/B test is worth while when there is a reasonable hypothesis to be tested. The a priori information isn't indicating that here, for me. The stated benefit of silica is stem strength, and I have no problems there. In the garden, or in the bedroom, LOL. ;-)
Indeed, studies won't show results of an illegal plant.

My last harvest was pretty top but always ready to improve. You are talking without experiencing, so your point is as valid as another one claiming it's worth it without testing it. As for the magazine, they say what money brings... Of course they will say it's worth it...
 
I have been posting this interview again lately as the president of dyna grow was testing cannabis to develop new fertilizer. He talks about his tissue sample results and the 2 nutrients that were in highest amounts in the plant were Potassium and silica.


the other thing i learned from these tests is that cannabis uses as much calcium as nitrogen. And very little magnesium in comparison.

Anyway. With soil/perlite enough silica should be present and with soiless/ hydro looks like it would benefit to supplement.



Maybe someone will actually listen to the interview if i keep posting it. It is quite conclusive but it is a half hour long.
 

Aqua Man

Staff member
Supporter
I think it changes based on type of grow. If your growing outdoors in the dirt you probably won't benefit from adding anything with a trace amounts requirement.

If your growing indoor hydro with RO that's strips everything then adding back trace amounts would be beneficial.

I think cal-mag is important in my grow style even though most see it as an over used cure all. I don't feel that's the case in hydro.

I think we all get used to viewing products based on our own needs and forget that needs change based on how we grow, fertilizer we use, and what is or not a part of the medium to begin with.

It's the marketing that it's beneficial in all applications that's BS.

Added: I use mega crop and prefer dry ferts for this reason. It provides a wide variety of sources of nutrients (not meaning different nutrients but sources of) and also a wide variety of additives and micros etc. This is not as easily accomplished with liquid fertilizers
 
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I have been posting this interview again lately as the president of dyna grow was testing cannabis to develop new fertilizer. He talks about his tissue sample results and the 2 nutrients that were in highest amounts in the plant were Potassium and silica.


the other thing i learned from these tests is that cannabis uses as much calcium as nitrogen. And very little magnesium in comparison.

Anyway. With soil/perlite enough silica should be present and with soiless/ hydro looks like it would benefit to supplement.



Maybe someone will actually listen to the interview if i keep posting it. It is quite conclusive but it is a half hour long.
I will grab it off and listen to it in few minutes :D
Thanks for the share!
 
Silica is an amazing product as a foliar feed to prevent spider mites and make the stems stronger, which will increase nutrient uptake increasing yields. I use it twice a week in veg, and stop once I switch to flower. Growing in soil, and yeah soil has a lot of silica, but a foliar boost really helps out.
 

Aqua Man

Staff member
Supporter
Silica is an amazing product as a foliar feed to prevent spider mites and make the stems stronger, which will increase nutrient uptake increasing yields. I use it twice a week in veg, and stop once I switch to flower. Growing in soil, and yeah soil has a lot of silica, but a foliar boost really helps out.
Never heard of it preventing spider mites (not saying it doesn't) but any foilar that increases the ph on the leaf surface will aid in preventing pm and other fungal infections.
 
I have been posting this interview again lately as the president of dyna grow was testing cannabis to develop new fertilizer. He talks about his tissue sample results and the 2 nutrients that were in highest amounts in the plant were Potassium and silica.


the other thing i learned from these tests is that cannabis uses as much calcium as nitrogen. And very little magnesium in comparison.

Anyway. With soil/perlite enough silica should be present and with soiless/ hydro looks like it would benefit to supplement.



Maybe someone will actually listen to the interview if i keep posting it. It is quite conclusive but it is a half hour long.
Nice interview! I have to test with silica! :)
 
1) plants need vanishingly small amounts of silica
2) silica is the most abundant material on earth

Silica additives do one thing - separate you from your money.
Many people use silica who incorporate super cropping into their style of growing. As stated before it aids in repairing plant tissue strengthening stems and internodes . Making a larger pathways for your nutrients to travel throughout the plant. Also if you use it. I’ve already noticed the need to no longer have so much support holding up the buds on the plants that received it to the ones that didn’t. So I suppose it’s a choice. Money on silica or on stakes and scrog nets and other support. I personally notice a big difference in the strength of my babies when they started getting it. Training becomes much less stressfull
 
Many people use silica who incorporate super cropping into their style of growing. As stated before it aids in repairing plant tissue strengthening stems and internodes . Making a larger pathways for your nutrients to travel throughout the plant. Also if you use it. I’ve already noticed the need to no longer have so much support holding up the buds on the plants that received it to the ones that didn’t. So I suppose it’s a choice. Money on silica or on stakes and scrog nets and other support. I personally notice a big difference in the strength of my babies when they started getting it. Training becomes much less stressfull
I could do a A/B test since I have 2 systems ... but do I want to try without? ahah =) Maybe next run.. :D
 
Ag-sil 16 is soluble. MB ferts is where I get it. Stay away from Kelp4Less silica in any form, it is not even close to soluble.

I've put it in nute mixes (not sure why anyone would mix their nuts in there, what's with that?) first, last, and in between, and haven't ever noticed that it wouldn't mix.

Silica may be in soil, but it's not always readily available, unless you have a bunch of microbes on payroll that actually get off their butts and chew it up.

I'll take soluble for fast growing plants like weed anytime. I've pissed money away on a lot of less worthy crap, lol!

I think it's a very big deal to weed.

I use Mega Crop, in coco, and still add Si, especially when it's real hot. I have seen the difference, lol!
 

jumpincactus

Premium Member
Supporter
without a media/soil test there is no way to know if your soil is Si deficient. Most soils dont need any additional Si in the mix. Lots of farmers just dump the next pretty bottle on the soup and dont even have a clue what their soil is lacking if any to start. Then they wrastle all sorts of perceived deficiencies when likey they are over ferting their soil.
Soil test always before loading your plot up with any additives. The knowledge base now is such that a lot of us are coming to know that force feeding is not the way to go, and it really doesn't produce heavier yields. The plants genetics can only process so much. Only give em what they need. :D my 2 pennies
 

cemchris

Staff member
Supporter
No you can top off with it. Just when mixing nutes. Like @Dirtbag said he dilutes into some water first then adds it to the res. This is also going to be for the more concentrated stuff since the bottles are already way diluted into water in the first place. It just doesnt like to mix into solutions as well as other things why the rule of thumb is into water or mixing it first before other nutes.

I also wanted to add the reason you put it in a res first is it will spike you PH up to 9-10ish. Even tho I never had an issue with it it can supposedly cause other nutes not to dilute or take a lot longer at that PH. So the theory is Silica first. PH back to range. then add nutes. I just don't put a lot of stock into that since people have been using it as PH Up for years and years. I do however tho put stock into pure potassium silicate takes a min to dissolve and can be kind of fickle depending on what you are mixing it into and will sort of sludge like if not in pure water. Larger granulated Calcium Nitrate is the only other thing I have seen take a min to dissolve and that is because of the size of the granules.

Silica/H202 as the res fills--> PH Down when full ---> Nitrates --> Sulfates ---> Mono Ammonium Phosphate. Bout 10 mins total between all of them for a bunch of undiluted salts. You don't have to get too crazy with steps or spend too much time on it. Specially if using something that's already blended in a formula and diluted.
 
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