Baphomet's Danky Dungeon Grow, Take 2 (Bacio Gelato x Gushers)

  • Thread starter bellumromanum
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MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

Nice flowers!

but none of them are even close to done growing. No need to check trichs before all the pistils have dies back not just turned orange. And there are tons of white ones. Still growing bud, bud.

i bet 2 more weeks of just growing then 2 weeks of ripening before its worth cutting.

Up to 25% yield and sometimes twice the potency happens last two weeks. The two weeks most growers wont wait that keeps me in business. ;-)
 
bellumromanum

bellumromanum

Nice flowers!

but none of them are even close to done growing. No need to check trichs before all the pistils have dies back not just turned orange. And there are tons of white ones. Still growing bud, bud.

i bet 2 more weeks of just growing then 2 weeks of ripening before its worth cutting.

Up to 25% yield and sometimes twice the potency happens last two weeks. The two weeks most growers wont wait that keeps me in business. ;-)

Thanks dude that's super helpful! I'm not upset about more time to get the next generation staged and ready to flip. I can be patient(ish) 🙃
 
bellumromanum

bellumromanum

My wife took this picture when I was hitting reps with 325. I think it's hard AF with Baphomet spotting my set

1612542691842.png
 
tobh

tobh

Supporter
Out of curiosity, what is the reasoning for arching the back? When I used to hit the gym with an ex-employer, I was under the impression that one's back was supposed to be flat on the bench. Is the arching meant to target the lower chest or considered proper form?
 
bellumromanum

bellumromanum

Out of curiosity, what is the reasoning for arching the back? When I used to hit the gym with an ex-employer, I was under the impression that one's back was supposed to be flat on the bench. Is the arching meant to target the lower chest or considered proper form?

Back arch is going to be largely dependent on the physiology of the lifter in question. The goal isn't actually to arch your back it's to retract and depress the scapula which, for me, results in a fairly dramatic arch. Mainly you want your entire body to be tight so there's no loss of force transfer all the way from your feet up to the barbell - you don't want to lose any power that should go into the pushing the bar to a wobbly position or instability. Also, with retracted scapula it's easier to isolate free shoulder movement which makes your rotator musculature vulnerable. Finally a retracted scapula allows for a tightly contracted upper back giving a better base to push from, and making it easier to load the lats on the eccentric portion of the lift. A lot of people don't realize that most of the power to get off of your chest in the bottom of a heavy bench actually comes from the lat and back.

All of this together also reduces the range of motion to lockout by allowing for fewer points of rotation. The distance to my bench lockout is several inches shorter if I keep my scapula retracted and don't allow my shoulder to roll forward at lockout.

This is very much a powerlifting bench modality though where the idea is to move as much weight as possible for a single rep with perfect (or as close as you can get) form. If I were bodybuilding or focusing on hypertrophy/muscle growth the movement may look very different.
 
Milson

Milson

Milsonian
Supporter
Back arch is going to be largely dependent on the physiology of the lifter in question. The goal isn't actually to arch your back it's to retract and depress the scapula which, for me, results in a fairly dramatic arch. Mainly you want your entire body to be tight so there's no loss of force transfer all the way from your feet up to the barbell - you don't want to lose any power that should go into the pushing the bar to a wobbly position or instability. Also, with retracted scapula it's easier to isolate free shoulder movement which makes your rotator musculature vulnerable. Finally a retracted scapula allows for a tightly contracted upper back giving a better base to push from, and making it easier to load the lats on the eccentric portion of the lift. A lot of people don't realize that most of the power to get off of your chest in the bottom of a heavy bench actually comes from the lat and back.

All of this together also reduces the range of motion to lockout by allowing for fewer points of rotation. The distance to my bench lockout is several inches shorter if I keep my scapula retracted and don't allow my shoulder to roll forward at lockout.

This is very much a powerlifting bench modality though where the idea is to move as much weight as possible for a single rep with perfect (or as close as you can get) form. If I were bodybuilding or focusing on hypertrophy/muscle growth the movement may look very different.
This was always my enemy with bench because my back is naturally much stronger than my chest due to my anatomy and my shoulders aren't great so i could lose power very easily and was just in general shitty at benching.
 
bellumromanum

bellumromanum

This was always my enemy with bench because my back is naturally much stronger than my chest due to my anatomy and my shoulders aren't great so i could lose power very easily and was just in general shitty at benching.

So as much as people like to discount us as big dumb meatheads there is actually a great deal of complexity to understanding the movements, especially when you need to understand them well enough to account for individual athlete's biomechanical differences and then learn how to cue and coach the movement correctly.

I've never met a guy with a real strong back that I could teach to bench well. But yea learning how to do it without making your shoulders super vulnerable is a different trick altogether
 
tobh

tobh

Supporter
Back arch is going to be largely dependent on the physiology of the lifter in question. The goal isn't actually to arch your back it's to retract and depress the scapula which, for me, results in a fairly dramatic arch. Mainly you want your entire body to be tight so there's no loss of force transfer all the way from your feet up to the barbell - you don't want to lose any power that should go into the pushing the bar to a wobbly position or instability. Also, with retracted scapula it's easier to isolate free shoulder movement which makes your rotator musculature vulnerable. Finally a retracted scapula allows for a tightly contracted upper back giving a better base to push from, and making it easier to load the lats on the eccentric portion of the lift. A lot of people don't realize that most of the power to get off of your chest in the bottom of a heavy bench actually comes from the lat and back.

All of this together also reduces the range of motion to lockout by allowing for fewer points of rotation. The distance to my bench lockout is several inches shorter if I keep my scapula retracted and don't allow my shoulder to roll forward at lockout.

This is very much a powerlifting bench modality though where the idea is to move as much weight as possible for a single rep with perfect (or as close as you can get) form. If I were bodybuilding or focusing on hypertrophy/muscle growth the movement may look very different.
This explains a lot of the issues I was experiencing then. Thank you for writing all that out! I was a pretty small dude back then, 5'6" and maybe 135lbs wet. Benching always scared me just because I was always wobbly, and after reading this, my form was way off. Shoulders would burn afterwards, and the lifts themselves were always pretty wobbly. Pretty sure those days caused some permanent damage (I don't lift anymore, though probably should be hitting the gym to keep those T levels up).
This was always my enemy with bench because my back is naturally much stronger than my chest due to my anatomy and my shoulders aren't great so i could lose power very easily and was just in general shitty at benching.
Same here. My back always has been way stronger than my chest. Lifts like flies, straight bar, and dumbbell presses are just sketchy. As bellumromanum said though, it looks to be more of a form thing than anything.
 
bellumromanum

bellumromanum

This explains a lot of the issues I was experiencing then. Thank you for writing all that out! I was a pretty small dude back then, 5'6" and maybe 135lbs wet. Benching always scared me just because I was always wobbly, and after reading this, my form was way off. Shoulders would burn afterwards, and the lifts themselves were always pretty wobbly. Pretty sure those days caused some permanent damage (I don't lift anymore, though probably should be hitting the gym to keep those T levels up).

Same here. My back always has been way stronger than my chest. Lifts like flies, straight bar, and dumbbell presses are just sketchy. As bellumromanum said though, it looks to be more of a form thing than anything.

No problem brother, don't get me started I'll go on and on and on. I love this shit. Watched a friend of mine compete and squat 903 this weekend. Fucking insane...

http://instagr.am/p/CLAUiD9De1C/
 
bellumromanum

bellumromanum

This explains a lot of the issues I was experiencing then. Thank you for writing all that out! I was a pretty small dude back then, 5'6" and maybe 135lbs wet. Benching always scared me just because I was always wobbly, and after reading this, my form was way off. Shoulders would burn afterwards, and the lifts themselves were always pretty wobbly. Pretty sure those days caused some permanent damage (I don't lift anymore, though probably should be hitting the gym to keep those T levels up).

Same here. My back always has been way stronger than my chest. Lifts like flies, straight bar, and dumbbell presses are just sketchy. As bellumromanum said though, it looks to be more of a form thing than anything.
Oh I see I made a mistake...


That was supposed to say I never met a guy with a real strong back that I couldn't teach to bench. Strong back is half of a strong bench, you probably just need some cueing
 
bellumromanum

bellumromanum

Started turning this Bombolone #6 cut into a mother yesterday, first hair cut. Had some trouble with clones in the past so changed the technique up a bit. Using gloves for my hands and a sterile scalpel to cut the stalk. Root riot cubes for rooting. We'll see how it goes.

@BudGoodman said I don't know shit cause I 45'd the cut. I felt this was abusive and unnecessary.
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Also the Chemdog D and Holy Grail Kush seedlings are coming along. Little rough start for a couple but I think we'll end up moving ~8 or so plants into flower from this batch:

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Buried that front guy in a little more soil and got him standing up straight.
 
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