Best Par Meter ?

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B

Burned Haze

Guest
what does everyone think is the best PAR Meter for under $400 and last ?


I've always wanted one to guarantee the par levels were stable around my sog
 
B

Burned Haze

Guest
Except I'm running 10 light de room and I want to make sure I'm not wasting more PAR than needed+ buy a brand that sucks .

No suggestions ? :(
 
R

rascali

unless you're really lame, the expensive PAR meter isn't going to tell you anything you already don't know, PERIOD I wasted the $400 and didn't learn anything new, except what I just told you.
 
Auto.Tents

Auto.Tents

unless you're really lame, the expensive PAR meter isn't going to tell you anything you already don't know, PERIOD I wasted the $400 and didn't learn anything new, except what I just told you.
What is it that you learned @rascali

If you have the money to spend on a proper PAR meter, you are probably an advanced grower.

@rascali & @PhatNuggz * Did the PAR Meter help dial in your grow, with respect to: light performance or upgrade, placement of lighting to maximize canopy exposure? Why was it a waste of money?
 
Animal Chin

Animal Chin

Supporter
I use one made by LightScout called the Quantum Meter. Sells for $150-$220.
Basic PAR meter that does the same thing as a lux or lumens meter, telling you where your most intense light is hitting and where it drops off but the reading is umols and not lux.
It's best use IMO is for finding height a new led should hang without guessing.
 
Freshone

Freshone

You can download a LUX app to your smartphone for free and then there is a simple calculation you do to find PAR,something like divide the lux by 68 to find par.Steven from HLG says it pretty damn close to the most expensive par meters.
 
Homesteader

Homesteader

Aksarben

Aksarben

I have 2 physical light or LUX meters, 3 if you count the one on the phone; Gosen Multi Pro camera meter, and a hand held LUX meter on the less expensive side from Amazon. Then I read and found out that works on most things, except LED. I was told for my LED lights I needed a PAR meter. Seems like the LUX shows up and gives me indication on how much less intense it is further away from the LED light source. BUT, was wondering also if there was a conversion for the LUX to PAR as stated above and why does not LUX work on the LED light?
 
Homesteader

Homesteader

Lux measures illumination and weights it heavily in the yellow and orange range, giving light that is pleasurable to the human eye a higher rating lowers the numbers for blues and reds. This is an okay measure if you are basing two of the same colors against each other but not so much apples to apples with two separate lights on the market if that makes sense. A yellow weighted light will give off much more Lux than one with blue or red but the plants want the opposite. As long as you understand this, the free app may be all most growers need IMO.
 
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H

Highkev

I wouldn’t buy expensive I got this cheap jump off and it works fine. For around 20 bucks. I’m gonna see how this meter holds up to my buddy’s 400 dollar meter and let ya know the results.
 
The Jewels

The Jewels

Apogee Quantum sensor.
Doesnt use batteries. The photocell produces electricity .
Had mine for six + years .
Waterproof, durable. No moving parts.
For how darn handy these things are , I can't believe more people don't have them .
I would be lost
 
Auto.Tents

Auto.Tents

I wouldn’t buy expensive I got this cheap jump off and it works fine. For around 20 bucks. I’m gonna see how this meter holds up to my buddy’s 400 dollar meter and let ya know the results.
This cheap meters are great for measuring light,(LUX) or lumens. But PAR (Photosynthetically Active Radiation) reads the Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density (PPFD).

LUX is a measure of the visible light, and that is all it reads. Since, photosynthesis for these plants occurs at different levels of color, you need to measure the Radiation PAR.

***Scien-E***
PAR measures micromoles of photons per meter squared per second (μmol m-2 s-1). This is the power of electromagnetic radiation in the spectral range that is used by plants for photosynthesis (400–700 nm). A PAR or PPFD meter will help you dial in rich blues, strong Reds, UVB, IR.....
 
The Jewels

The Jewels

the spectral range that is used by plants for photosynthesis (400–700 nm). A PAR or PPFD meter will help you dial in rich blues, strong Reds, UVB, IR.....
Well contstructed paradox .
UVB is below 400nm and IR is above 700
So ,,,no, it wont certainly wont dail in anything like that .

The reading is a weighted average across the usable spectrum . Would only be helpful when testing individual photon flux, from a specific wavelength , by an idividual emitter .
Assuming , of course , you bought the metre specificaly made for LED measurements.
 
H

Highkev

This cheap meters are great for measuring light,(LUX) or lumens. But PAR (Photosynthetically Active Radiation) reads the Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density (PPFD).

LUX is a measure of the visible light, and that is all it reads. Since, photosynthesis for these plants occurs at different levels of color, you need to measure the Radiation PAR.

***Scien-E***
PAR measures micromoles of photons per meter squared per second (μmol m-2 s-1). This is the power of electromagnetic radiation in the spectral range that is used by plants for photosynthesis (400–700 nm). A PAR or PPFD meter will help you dial in rich blues, strong Reds, UVB, IR.....
Dam I thought I had a par meter not a lux meter thanks for catching that lol
 
Auto.Tents

Auto.Tents

Well contstructed paradox .
UVB is below 400nm and IR is above 700
So ,,,no, it wont certainly wont dail in anything like that .

The reading is a weighted average across the usable spectrum . Would only be helpful when testing individual photon flux, from a specific wavelength , by an idividual emitter .
Assuming , of course , you bought the metre specificaly made for LED measurements.
Yes you need a color spectrum meter in conjunction with a PAR Sensor to achieve the photosynthesis reaction best for your plant at that moment.
Seedling, VEG, Flower, Genetics, Air quality, humidity, Light Source, CO2.... these are all changeable factors in a grow tent. Are you over using electricity on Lighting you don't need? Is your light on it's last legs, or hotter to the left than the right?
These tools help cut the learning curve and can be used when garden experimenting (which we all do). But nobody says they are mandatory. If you have the funds, there are a few of these for around $200 that have helped intermediate growers take the next step.
 
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