Fox Farm schedule great with Sativas/Hybrids but auto-flowers all getting bud rot...

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PauliBhoy

PauliBhoy

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This is also why, despite having a greenhouse, my outside plants are chosen to finish before the end of September. It becomes too hard to control the environment in my greenhouse once we drift into October. There are plenty of fast/early finishing photos that will finish in a Michigan September. It's much better than dealing with but rot and other issues that pop up in the fall.
Hell yeah! This is what I'm talking about.

Any chance your fav genetics have White Widow or Jack Herer genetics? 😉
 
MIGrampaUSA

MIGrampaUSA

2,074
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Hell yeah! This is what I'm talking about.

Any chance your fav genetics have White Widow or Jack Herer genetics? 😉
It seems most have skunk parentage that I've grown lately. I cut a Caramelo fast version this past weekend. I have another I'll be cutting in the next day or so. I started those plants with the idea of growing them in my greenhouse, but changed my mind and kept them indoors. I was glad I did. It's been difficult conditions outside.

I do have White Widow waiting for a future grow ... Some of my favorite early flowering plants are sugar black rose and shiskaberry.
 
harryohm

harryohm

40
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This has nothing to do with your soil.

Not necessarily "bad" but not good for your conditions.

Most folks on here are obsessed with creating optimal conditions instead of finding genetics that work with their imperfect ones.
You could buy equipment and spend money on power to run them and emit carbon to create the perfect conditions, or you could go with genetics that work with your climate/conditions and spend your resources finding genetics that work even better.

The problem is most breeders are doing all their selections under optimal conditions instead of breeding for greenhouse or outdoor conditions. This is basically the same race to the bottom that industrial ag is running.
I just started another thread basically asking about what you just said. I would like to find any strains that historically do well in the Northeast/Upstate NY, either outdoors or in my greenhouse. I've been talking to a lot of other growers locally but so many of them were like me and buying from whatever seed bank with no thought to what has worked year after year for this climate/environment. Any help/thoughts would be much appreciated!!!
 
harryohm

harryohm

40
18
This is also why, despite having a greenhouse, my outside plants are chosen to finish before the end of September. It becomes too hard to control the environment in my greenhouse once we drift into October. There are plenty of fast/early finishing photos that will finish in a Michigan September. It's much better than dealing with but rot and other issues that pop up in the fall.
As to controlling the environment in the greenhouse I was having serious humidity issues this summer but once they went into flower stage I reduced my watering first by half and then by a third, sometimes going 4 days without water. The plants are now thriving and the humidity has stayed around 50% for the last few weeks... before it was consistently in the 90's!!!
 
MIGrampaUSA

MIGrampaUSA

2,074
263
MIGrampaUSA

MIGrampaUSA

2,074
263
As to controlling the environment in the greenhouse I was having serious humidity issues this summer but once they went into flower stage I reduced my watering first by half and then by a third, sometimes going 4 days without water. The plants are now thriving and the humidity has stayed around 50% for the last few weeks... before it was consistently in the 90's!!!
There are several things that I can do to help on controlling the humidity. When I decided not to use it, my original plan was to get some work done in there. I'm so far behind on my "Honey Do" list that I have not gotten to my greenhouse yet. I'll use it next year for sure.
 
PauliBhoy

PauliBhoy

221
63
As to controlling the environment in the greenhouse I was having serious humidity issues this summer but once they went into flower stage I reduced my watering first by half and then by a third, sometimes going 4 days without water. The plants are now thriving and the humidity has stayed around 50% for the last few weeks... before it was consistently in the 90's!!!
Are you referring to the pic in your album? The one that reads 54% RH at 70F?
 

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