Germination Bomb For Old Or Difficult Seeds

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i do not think so.

but as i was reading the paper i found it really interesting when i came across the storage test. if the short term test this person was performing carry forward with the same results the storage used by most seed junkies might not be the smartest thing ....

& the seeds popping better at lower temps was interesting with the time of the year also being a factor in germination rates. i really believe keeping everything as close with natural cycles is best.

they did the study for eradication efforts so they studied the germination process. the entire paper has tons of info-
 
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So at this point i'm running a couple test.

I started with the seeds in the pressure jar for two days. ( 3% hydrogen peroxide, pinch of kelp meal, pinch of worm castings ) I have ten seeds wrapped in a small paper towel inside a baggy. i cracked 1/2 of them myself. i keep them inside two plates for 12 hours warm about 80-85º, then put them by the window getting some sun. the temps drop at this point so they are 45-50º. ( its -3 today with wind chill about -25 below, -40 wind chill last night )

the other 30 seeds are in one inch of dirt on a plate. i keep them warm most of the time and give them sun and drop the temps like the others.

gonna try this for two months before following a few of the test above with the other seeds. these seeds were in a closet since 1994 and i guess seen temps from 40's-80's so we will see how it goes.....
 
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I have begun to question whether or not cannabis has a dormancy. I think they just die. I have never seen old seeds,over 15 years do much.
Just fyi small amounts of superthrive drops pH substantially. This is something to be aware of when dosing. I should be acquiring a number of different PGRs in the hopes of germing 40+ year old seed stock, vaguely labeled with place-ish of origin. We al know how that goes..

Great luck all
 
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@homebrew420

ya, after sitting in the jar i cracked six at the seam. once it opened up a bit i picked at the very edge until it fell off ...... i'm a little worried, they do not open up along the seam clean, it chips away from each side. so.......... in the hemp study they talk about decay near the top soil with seeds because of the breakdown over time. so i also have 30 seeds sitting in 1 or two inches of dirt on a plate. some older seeds take time so ill wait those out .... i have a temp range or drop with these after 12 from 80º down around 50º ....

my first test last year with just water they swelled up thats it no tail .....

i used 1/2 water, hydrogen peroxide 3% for the rest, pinch of kelp meal and pinch of worm castings in the pressure jar for 48 hrs ....

that pic is after 6 days, 2 in the jar 4 in a little paper towel inside a small baggy that i give 12 hours of sun and cfl, the rest inside a warm plate around 80º, i drop the temps for a few hours also around 50º ...

no tails yet...... ?
 
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I have not tried gibberellic acid yet like the studies talk about either i figured i'd try the kelp, castings first ...

 
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nothing yet ....

nice swell on the overall inside, some green but no change yet after that. no tails .... using a new towel wrap every 24 hrs dipped in the mixture im using so no mold developes ....

so i figure with seeing the green thats real good so i will wait these out. use gibberellic acid next time, alone and with kelp mixture and try a higher percentage of hydrogen peroxide in the other test. but after seeing the green im confident something will work .... but the older they are, the germination process is slow so these still might start roots .....

and only two seed banks sold durban poison in the 80's, nevil's the seed bank and the super sativa seed club that formed from sacred seeds ( sam, maple leaf wilson, ect ) ..... they are f2's or 3's not 100% sure on that only info he made them in the late 80's and had given my buddy 7,000, but from the lips of the guy that ran them last in 1992. They were 9ft tall in the outdoors, most looked the same, good yieldin the midwest outdoor and the shit was the strongest shit he ever smoked , people would go nuts every summer. i picked out all the bad , cracked seeds and still have 1,500. selection on a couple would be great but for this strain i really only need a male and female ......

he grew them from 89 until 1992. they came from an older head around the indianapolis area. the old man had the top shit i guess, a killer afghani he never let out even today. but i guess he got tons of gear . and he had townhouses set up growing then, my buddy runs his uk skunk cheese , its nasty. so if anybody is from that area its from him. he's been selling dank for 30 years. but i have no idea the location not in that state but the old man still grows, not sure if he still selling. but he did for a long time ....

so if these pop, durban is back ......
 
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and if you look at the seeds , they look alien on one side , clearish in the pic. i think as the outside coat changed from light brown darker as they soaked, the ends look funny but its not mold or nothing lke that. it not b.s., or a new durban ...... never seen that on seeds before until i posted the pic above. not sure if all old seeds do this, but something i noticed already

the proof will be in veg im very , very sure of that. the dude that passed them is old, i believe him .... & i never ran it or smoked it so people will see for themselves that know better !

or they don't pop ? another thing again from what ive heard, the paint ball scene pro has tons of heads and the cuts are sourced from that. they travel the country the top groups i guess, so not being in indy or paint ball if ya smoked dank from them he's one of the guy's .... just the rest of the story.
 
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The Millennium Seed Bank Partnership is the largest ex situ plant conservation programme in the world. Our focus is on global plant life faced with the threat of extinction and plants of most use for the future. The seeds we save are conserved in seed banks as an insurance against the risk of extinction in their native habitat.

How can I germinate seeds from my garden?

If recently harvested, filled, mature seeds have been placed on damp but not waterlogged compost and provided a little warmth, and they still won't germinate, the most likely causes are either inappropriate environmental conditions (particularly temperature and light) or dormancy.

The conditions required for germination, although partly genetically determined in many cases, are strongly influenced by the environment under which the seeds developed. Two seed-lots of the same species may behave in quite different ways. This said, with a little detective work and some experimentation, it is often possible to increase the likelihood of successful germination.

The most important thing to consider is whether the seeds have a hard seed coat or some covering structure that might prevent water uptake or physically inhibit germination. If so, they may need to be scarified. Filing through the seed coat with a narrow file until the contents are just visible may be possible with larger seeds. Smaller seeds might be gently rubbed within a folded piece of fine sandpaper.

The next thing to consider is the ecology of the species. Where does the species naturally occur in the world and at what altitude? For instance, seeds of many temperate species that are programmed to germinate in the spring often respond to a period of moist chilling. After scarification (if appropriate), the seeds can be placed on wetted tissue paper inside a reasonably airtight container and left within a refrigerator (+ 4°C) for up to three months. The moisture should be checked occasionally. Alternatively, the scarified seeds could be placed in or on moist compost and left within a cold-frame over winter. Following this treatment, the seeds can then be germinated on moist compost and in the warm as usual. Many small-seeded species need exposure to light for germination and also benefit from experiencing temperature fluctuations each day. This is an adaptation to prevent germination until the seeds are brought to the soil surface by disturbance.

If none of the above work, it might be necessary to try different germination temperatures. Unfortunately, the temperature range over which seeds germinate may change as the dormancy status of the seed changes.

The Seed Information Database (SID) provides germination data on seed lots that have been successfully germinated by the Millennium Seed Bank. This may help provide a number of clues.


http://www.kew.org/science-conservation/millennium-seed-bank-partnership/about/millennium-seed-bank-faqs#allstored
 
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another post i found. took his buddy 55 days before tails started. i'm about 25 days in myself and keeping the temps a little lower helps. so patience pays off in the post below. i've seen a few seeds turn to mush over time and i think that might be the heat .....


........ " --- Let's shift this conversation away from freshly purchased seeds and onto that old bag of seeds you saved from days gone by. I had some Jamaican Sativa seeds that were 15 years old and had been exposed to extreme heat. I gave them to an individual who liked Jamaican Sativa but let that person know "look" there is almost no possible chance these will germinate.

-- This person using the paper towel method was determined. After a few weeks passed I believed all hope was lost. This person pushed on changing the paper towels regularly and keeping seeds moist.

-- I always believed if nothing germinated by 2 or 3 weeks it would never happen. I would discard the seeds as bunk, no good. After a month past we began teasing this person. "You're crazy, there is no way those seeds will ever germinate...etc." I was surprised to see those seeds actually germinated after six weeks.

-- Talk about an old dog learning a new trick. I thought about all of the strains I tossed after three weeks had passed without germination and all of the strains I still had believing their time had passed. I jumped right into my oldest seed stock with enthusiasm [and] was able to bring several strains back into existence. One Ethiopian Sativa strain I finally germinated at 48 days. I now call the strain E48.

-- One of the longest germinations I have seen was between 56 and 60 days on a batch of 24 year old P3 (War Hero) seeds.

-- So, if you are a breeder or pack rat that has an old bag of seeds from days gone by there is a good chance you can germinate those seeds after all. A friend of mine actually germinated a batch of Acapulco Gold seeds from 1979.

-- I believe growing from seed plays a vital role in understanding the plant's entire life cycle. I encourage all growers to get some seed growing experience. Plants grown from seed often finish faster than clones and the best method of isolating that special mother plant is from growing seeds. " .............
 
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just wow ....

the truth getting deleted in other threads. so once again so will this thread ..... later ....

just delete all this spam !!!!!
 
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