Had high hopes after last seasons failures.

  • Thread starter HerbCyclone
  • Start date
  • Tagged users None
HerbCyclone

HerbCyclone

Alright, I'm reaching here. The past few years have been pretty turbulent with loss and grief. My gardens are my brief respite from the craziness. I have a lot of fruits and veggies in my outdoor beds which always seem incredibly productive.
Last year my 6 plants (green house) turned into 5 in July, then 4 in August. Not for lack of effort, but by creating the wrong environment using my own dense hand sifted compost. The 4 barely produced, and were plagued with thrips and mites so spraying was constant.
Had a really good start this year(about 2 months ago in march) then damaged all my starts a few weeks ago with the first transplant going into 20% chicken compost and 80% high porosity potting soil.
Attributed damage to N burn, and then noticed thrips and possible russet or broad mite damage.
I've been spraying neem every evening for the last 2 weeks and new growth looks generally good on shoots and tops of plants, but I'm wondering if production would be better on fresh seedlings or even clones at this point after kicking my plants in the nuts, so to speak. I still have at least 5 months until harvest. Please help me have a good year!
 
Pushrod Monkey

Pushrod Monkey

Think that really weird one should be replaced? I'm thinking that thing is weeks away from looking right, if ever.
Heck no. Get bugs handled and keep going. Your huge container is holding back growth for now. But once roots find boundaries they’ll take off.
 
HerbCyclone

HerbCyclone

Heck no. Get bugs handled and keep going. Your huge container is holding back growth for now. But once roots find boundaries they’ll take off.
Thank you! I'll keep a backup on deck just in case.
Forgot to add that I started it's backup at same time. It's of similair size in a 5 gal, but with more consistent healthy growth. Don't want to leave anything out.
 
Last edited:
Pushrod Monkey

Pushrod Monkey

Thank you! I'll keep a backup on deck just in case.
Forgot to add that I started it's backup at same time. It's of similair size in a 5 gal, but with more consistent healthy growth. Don't want to leave anything out.
More growth because of container size. Just give them time and don’t overwater or overdo the nutrients.
 
HerbCyclone

HerbCyclone

More growth because of container size. Just give them time and don’t overwater or overdo the nutrients.
There is one inconsistency with that Charlie Brown Christmas tree plant I should add- I transplanted it into a narrow and deep pot(2 gal) compared to the shallow and wide pots(also 2 gal) I used with the others. I wouldn't think that would effect anything but the drainage is much slower than the other after the final transplant.
 
Pushrod Monkey

Pushrod Monkey

There is one inconsistency with that Charlie Brown Christmas tree plant I should add- I transplanted it into a narrow and deep pot(2 gal) compared to the shallow and wide pots(also 2 gal) I used with the others. I wouldn't think that would effect anything but the drainage is much slower than the other after the final transplant.
Graduated container size transplanting results in faster root development and vegetative growth. When it has outgrown the Solo cup then put in a half gallon container at the largest. Next time 1 gallon and etc.

It’s more work but proven. Again I think I’d just hang in now. You’ll probably be surprised how big they get once the roots are established.
 
Aqua Man

Aqua Man

Staff member
Supporter
For bugs that have larvae in media bti (mosquito dunks) will go a long way to prevention and solution. Organic and no chemicals. It's a bacteria that the larvae eat and die.
 
Aqua Man

Aqua Man

Staff member
Supporter
There is one inconsistency with that Charlie Brown Christmas tree plant I should add- I transplanted it into a narrow and deep pot(2 gal) compared to the shallow and wide pots(also 2 gal) I used with the others. I wouldn't think that would effect anything but the drainage is much slower than the other after the final transplant.
I personally don't really buy into the rootbound claims to much. It's more about the ability to keep a stable media is more difficult in smaller pots.

This may help explain how pot size and shape will affect watering and plants.

 
Pushrod Monkey

Pushrod Monkey

I personally don't really buy into the rootbound claims to much. It's more about the ability to keep a stable media is more difficult in smaller pots.

This may help explain how pot size and shape will affect watering and plants.

Nobody has mentioned rootbound. Nobody. I’ve grown a few years and know what works. You can believe it or blow it off. I’ll chop big no matter what you do.
 
GNick55

GNick55

Staff member
Supporter
Alright, I'm reaching here. The past few years have been pretty turbulent with loss and grief. My gardens are my brief respite from the craziness. I have a lot of fruits and veggies in my outdoor beds which always seem incredibly productive.
Last year my 6 plants (green house) turned into 5 in July, then 4 in August. Not for lack of effort, but by creating the wrong environment using my own dense hand sifted compost. The 4 barely produced, and were plagued with thrips and mites so spraying was constant.
Had a really good start this year(about 2 months ago in march) then damaged all my starts a few weeks ago with the first transplant going into 20% chicken compost and 80% high porosity potting soil.
Attributed damage to N burn, and then noticed thrips and possible russet or broad mite damage.
I've been spraying neem every evening for the last 2 weeks and new growth looks generally good on shoots and tops of plants, but I'm wondering if production would be better on fresh seedlings or even clones at this point after kicking my plants in the nuts, so to speak. I still have at least 5 months until harvest. Please help me have a good year!
all your fruit trees and plants are attracting the insects..
 
Aqua Man

Aqua Man

Staff member
Supporter
Nobody has mentioned rootbound. Nobody. I’ve grown a few years and know what works. You can believe it or blow it off. I’ll chop big no matter what you do.
Didn't say they did... just commenting on the container sizes. Not sure what the issue is here. Nor did I comment about on your harvest

But I'd point out you know what works for you and that's what's important but by no means does it mean it's the only or best way
 
Last edited:
Aqua Man

Aqua Man

Staff member
Supporter
Found a photo right before it went in the big pot.
Yeah plenty of room there... like @Pushrod Monkey said if you up pot multiple times you will get a very nice full pot of roots. They will always grow down as that's where the most moisture is and gravitropism just sends em down. So by doing it the way he says you will have a larger amount of roots exposed to an area higher in oxygen and much more even distribution of roots.

If they just go into big pots then your more prone to over water and you won't get as of good distribution until the pot starts to fill up completely.

100% I would take his advice on this in the future. I'm not sure I would try and change it now though.
 
Top Bottom