Legion Of Living Organic Soil

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CrimsonEcho

CrimsonEcho

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Okay cool - this is good to know! Now that I am reading more about this I am curious if "charging" biochar might make the soil too hot if done incorrectly. http://www.dc.delinat-institut.org/doc/english/biochar-activation.pdf see the underlined portion

C. Biochar with liquid fertilizers fertilizers
1. Calculate the amount of fertilizer you need for a given area. Mixing with biochar reduces leaching and outgassing of nutrients, so that
fertilizer efficiency increases significantly and a total of only half of the conventionally calculated amount is required.
2. Make sure that the fertilizer contains not only the main elements, N, P, K, Mg, but has a very high mineral diversity. In case of doubt, add some rock flour.
3. Dissolve the calculated amount of mineral fertilizer in sufficient water.
4. Give as much biochar in a period of 2 days to allow complete absorption of the added liquid.

Organic liquid fertilizer is preferably used for charging instead of NPK fertilizer. Liquid animal manure is an excellent example to use for charging biochar.

Variant C is not about microbial colonization. In this case this will take place in the soil. In organic farming, mineral fertilizer trade is prohibited.
I can’t talk about ionic fertilizers but what you end up with are time release organic fertilizer. You should charge it and add it while considering the balance of course. Adding anything in copious amounts would throw the balance off or make the soil too hot. This char and the nutrients it holds will not be as readily available as free ions or anything but it’ll slowly feed your plant. Well not slowly, but not too fast either :)
 
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M

milk103

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I can’t talk about ionic fertilizers but what you end up with are time release organic fertilizer. You should charge it and add it while considering the balance of course. Adding anything in copious amounts would throw the balance off or make the soil too hot. This char and the nutrients they hold will not be as readily available as free ions or anything but it’ll slowly feed your plant. Well not slowly, but not too fast either :)
Ah okay - this makes sense. Thanks again for sharing this information - I have been using biochar uncharged this whole time!
 
CrimsonEcho

CrimsonEcho

Self-Proclaimed Don Quixote
Supporter
Okay cool - this is good to know! Now that I am reading more about this I am curious if "charging" biochar might make the soil too hot if done incorrectly. http://www.dc.delinat-institut.org/doc/english/biochar-activation.pdf see the underlined portion

C. Biochar with liquid fertilizers fertilizers
1. Calculate the amount of fertilizer you need for a given area. Mixing with biochar reduces leaching and outgassing of nutrients, so that
fertilizer efficiency increases significantly and a total of only half of the conventionally calculated amount is required.
2. Make sure that the fertilizer contains not only the main elements, N, P, K, Mg, but has a very high mineral diversity. In case of doubt, add some rock flour.
3. Dissolve the calculated amount of mineral fertilizer in sufficient water.
4. Give as much biochar in a period of 2 days to allow complete absorption of the added liquid.

Organic liquid fertilizer is preferably used for charging instead of NPK fertilizer. Liquid animal manure is an excellent example to use for charging biochar.

Variant C is not about microbial colonization. In this case this will take place in the soil. In organic farming, mineral fertilizer trade is prohibited.
Ahhh, i should also underline again that i used activated carbon, the stuff you use for filtering and not biochar. Logically the thousands of pieces of filtering carbon has a much larger surface area than a solid piece of biochar. So you should follow the routine that the company suggests but leaving it longer doesnt hurt.
 
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OldSmokie76

OldSmokie76

Ahhh, i should also underline again that i used activated carbon, the stuff you use for filtering and not biochar. Logically the thousands of pieces of filtering carbon has a much larger surface area than a solid piece of biochar. So you should follow the routine that the company suggests but leaving it longer doesnt hurt.
I have some used carbon from an old filter I repacked. Suppose I could use it for Bio char? Charge it in a slurry of water and granular amendments. Aerated? Now you got my wheels turning.
 
OldSmokie76

OldSmokie76

Yeah basil is a given. Besides that i also think about using trifolium repens and thyme just because i have them at hand. I want to create diversity as much as i can. I also dont want to overcrowd :) maybe chives could be in the mix too.
Those tomatoes look nice. I’ve dedicated half of my tent to starting seeds early and experimenting with tomatoes and cucumbers in small pots. Also got some artichokes and peppers. I just want to see how they’ll do. All organic too. I’ll post some pics if they ever get fruits (well if they ripen lets say):D
All my veggies are outside. I use greenhouse to start early. This will be second year in the veggie garden. I had some hit and miss last year. Cold moist spring. Good luck with the veggies.
 
CrimsonEcho

CrimsonEcho

Self-Proclaimed Don Quixote
Supporter
I have some used carbon from an old filter I repacked. Suppose I could use it for Bio char? Charge it in a slurry of water and granular amendments. Aerated? Now you got my wheels turning.
It better to use readily available stuff so that the carbon pieces hold as much food as possible imo. A very strong solution. I soaked in a non-aerated solution. For a week. Vibrated the mix whenever i remembered, to release any air adsorbed by the carbon. Don’t know if it helped or not but it didn’t hurt i’m sure :)
In anycase carbon is good for soil. To a degree of course. If the carbon is not chemically treated in anyway, it should be fine.
 
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CrimsonEcho

CrimsonEcho

Self-Proclaimed Don Quixote
Supporter
All my veggies are outside. I use greenhouse to start early. This will be second year in the veggie garden. I had some hit and miss last year. Cold moist spring. Good luck with the veggies.
Don’t have a greenhouse as it does not fit into my semi-urban setting so i just keep myself entertained, tending to them at the unused half of my tent hahah.
Its always a hit and miss situation first time with a cultivar. I try to do at least 4-5 in my garden to see which ones are actually worth doing in the long run. Good luck to you to man. Its priceless to literally pick the fruits of your labour :D
 
JediHustle

JediHustle

I'm currently sprouting alfalfa seeds for a SST and about to prep some mung bean and barely as well. My babies were on the struggle bus at first with cold temperatures and over watering and have recovered immensely after reconfiguring environmental factors.

My question to is would it be too last to feed my girls a SST with alfalfa and mung bean this late into flower? My blueberry sinmint hasn't showed signs of milkyness just yet. My other ladies are in week 9 with no signs of amber just yet.
 
Madmax

Madmax

Hi gents.i purchased some organic professors nutrients bloom 1/2/4 and mixed it in with water 6.3 and its showing 4.5...should i let the microbes buffer it or ph up it...the dude off professor nutrients site has said to ph it...if i dont use it how long does it take the microbes to buffer it..also if i use this fertilizer every 4 days etc is it going to lower the ph of soil gradually.

Cheers max
 
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Organikz

Organikz

Hey guys. Sorry I haven't been around. If anyone has questions just DM me. I lost all my notifications because they're so old. I've been working on a 100 plant hunt of a 84' PNW NL5 Eugene Cut Bx which is pre Dutch. I am working on this project with Gascanastan. Here is one of my selections. She is partially seeded. Original NL genetics didn't make seed very well. I just water with aloe and one compost tea at early flower, which I could have skipped.

This girl is guaranteed to bring cookies to its knees. She has that old school dank skunk smell overlaying key lime pie flavors.

IMG_20190215_072912_013.jpg
 
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MrChemovar

MrChemovar

Hey guys. Sorry I haven't been around. If anyone has questions just DM me. I lost all my notifications because they're so old. I've been working on a 100 plant hunt of a 84' PNW NL5 Eugene Cut Bx which is pre Dutch. I am working on this project with Gascanastan. Here is one of my selections. She is partially seeded. Original NL genetics didn't make seed very well. I just water with aloe and one compost tea at early flower, which I could have skipped.

This girl is guaranteed to bring cookies to its knees. She has that old school dank skunk smell overlaying key lime pie flavors.

View attachment 856723
Damn, I need a cut of the 84' NL5 in my life. I live in the PNW and have a hard time finding that ha....
 
MrChemovar

MrChemovar

A very special cultivar known as Talk of Kabul. These seeds are from Mark Castle. Full story at seedfinder. She's so elusive even the Romans and the Soviets couldn't capture her during their invasions of Afghanistan.

"The Drug Lord's Cultivar"
View attachment 856726
What size pots are these? Love the 4 in 1 on the bottom, doing the same but with 3 different chemovars and all from seed. Which makes them all at different heights which is frustrating but she's doing well. What are you thoughts on amounts for sprouting mung bean during 2nd week of flower, recipe wise that is
 
Organikz

Organikz

What size pots are these? Love the 4 in 1 on the bottom, doing the same but with 3 different chemovars and all from seed. Which makes them all at different heights which is frustrating but she's doing well. What are you thoughts on amounts for sprouting mung bean during 2nd week of flower, recipe wise that is
I messaged you. Mung is very good for flower. High in phosphatase and potassium
 
Wolfe

Wolfe

Ok quick question, I run los, super soil. Problem I run into that I have controlled but not eliminated is white flies. The los seems to be a beacon for those suckers here in monterey, almost everyone I know has some sort of white fly issue. What could be done to eliminate the fuckers? Organic methods ?
If your plants are outside you can hose the entire plant off. You can use a hose straight from your house with a spray attachment. Make sure all your stuff is nice and sturdy. If you want to use filtered water you could use a pump and hose to do the same thing. Spray them off from time to time.
 
Organikz

Organikz

Ok quick question, I run los, super soil. Problem I run into that I have controlled but not eliminated is white flies. The los seems to be a beacon for those suckers here in monterey, almost everyone I know has some sort of white fly issue. What could be done to eliminate the fuckers? Organic methods ?
Dude I'm sorry I am so late to respond. Let me tell you about a sure thing. Plants do take a small hit because its harsh but it eradicates shit! I've found that using 1 TBS of Dr Bronners Citrus Soap per gallon of water is extremely effective and can also be used in conjunction with neem/karanja but I would only use 1 tsp bronners citrus and 1 tsp neem/karanja. Karanja actually would require half of what is required for neem applications. Gas and I discussed it in depth. Karanja is higher quality and cleaner. They are also finding compounds in karanja that are more effective than Azadirachtin. Karanja has no Azadirachtin. I know people have started false info regarding neem mostly due to azatrol and azamax being considered as neem by most. However both companies recently were caught using conventional pesticides hidden in the product. I only use ahimsah wild crafted cold pressed neem. I get mine from neemresource.com.

So make the solution I discussed per gallon of water. Btw the bronners acts as a surfactant and emulsifier if used with neem but I do add some fresh aloe. As I said the treatment is harsh and aloe helps your plants mitigate the damage.

Apply every 3rd day for 12 days for a total of 4 applications. I get some green lacewing larvae on order in the mean time. Try to time it so that the lacewings arrive as you finish the knockdown spray regiment. Drop the lacewings and watch them mow through whatever remains. I simultaneously hit them with nematodes and BTI.

*do not spray anything besides 1/4 fresh aloe per gallon of water while lacewings run. It takes about 2 weeks. Always spray when lights first go out.

One more thing to mention. Keep coming back. Start at one end and come back. Make sure to concentrate on the underside of the leaves mostly. I keep coming back from the first plant I hit and hit every plant 4x or until I run out. You will see plants continue to soak it up. Most guys hust get the plants wet and call it good. The plants can continue to absorb neem/karanja and it will create higher concentrations in the plant tissue ensuring it delivers a highly effective amount.

What's the big secret in this bronner's soap? Citric acid which acts as a contact killer. It's a neurotoxin to insects and also softens their exoskeleton. Highly effective shit!
 
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Jack og

Jack og

Staff member
Supporter
Dude I'm sorry I am so late to respond. Let me tell you about a sure thing. Plants do take a small hit because its harsh but it eradicates shit! I've found that using 1 TBS of Dr Bronners Citrus Soap per gallon of water is extremely effective and can also be used in conjunction with neem/karanja but I would only use 1 tsp bronners citrus and 1 tsp neem/karanja. Karanja actually would require half of what is required for neem applications. Gas and I discussed it in depth. Karanja is higher quality and cleaner. They are also finding compounds in karanja that are more effective than Azadirachtin. Karanja has no Azadirachtin. I know people have started false info regarding neem mostly due to azatrol and azamax being considered as neem by most. However both companies recently were caught using conventional pesticides hidden in the product. I only use ahimsah wild crafted cold pressed neem. I get mine from neemresource.com.

So make the solution I discussed per gallon of water. Btw the bronners acts as a surfactant and emulsifier if used with neem but I do add some fresh aloe. As I said the treatment is harsh and aloe helps your plants mitigate the damage.

Apply every 3rd day for 12 days for a total of 4 applications. I get some green lacewing larvae on order in the mean time. Try to time it so that the lacewings arrive as you finish the knockdown spray regiment. Drop the lacewings and watch them mow through whatever remains. I simultaneously hit them with nematodes and BTI.

*do not spray anything besides 1/4 fresh aloe per gallon of water while lacewings run. It takes about 2 weeks. Always spray when lights first go out.

One more thing to mention. Keep coming back. Start at one end and come back. Make sure to concentrate on the underside of the leaves mostly. I keep coming back from the first plant I hit and hit every plant 4x or until I run out. You will see plants continue to soak it up. Most guys hust get the plants wet and call it good. The plants can continue to absorb neem/karanja and it will create higher concentrations in the plant tissue ensuring it delivers a highly effective amount.

What's the big secret in this bronner's soap? Citric acid which acts as a contact killer. It's a neurotoxin to insects and also softens their exoskeleton. Highly effective shit!
Copy that! Duckers hard to eradicate! It’s all about management now. Azamax with sns 209 in the regiment now and so far effective. We do keep it organic so takes a bit more work and diligence! Appreciate the feedback brother!:D
 
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