Morphing Plants

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B

Baddog

Ok So Crap My Buds Appear to be morphing out on me. I've got what appears to be male flowers popping out under my buds! The strain is Alaskan thunder fuck. Plants are 3 weeks into flower! It looks to be strain specific as I am growing 3 other strains in the same room! There has been no light issues! Clones came from plants that were moved in from veg! I had no problems like this with the last run! My question is there anything I can do to reverse this? Just grasping at straws before I start pulling plants! I'm not exactly sure what causes this except light but I have not had any problems in that area! Its on 16 of 18 plants of this strain and not in the other 2 strains I have growing. I'm Baffled:worried!
Dose anyone have any Ideas!
 
dextr0

dextr0

^^^You can pull nanners (male parts), but u would have to be very careful and watchful. You also need to make certain that there are no light leaks or all that will be in vain.

I was messing with my buds today and saw one nanner and it did pollinate my girls...so very careful if u do. Im just sayin.
 
joeca1i

joeca1i

Looks like you got a bunch of hermie's.If its popping out on all the bud sites,I'd trash um,all your gonna get is seeded buds.
 
R

Relaxed420

There is a Dutch Master product called 'reverse' and it will help prevent if you are still early enough before the seeds start. You can pull the nanners and use reverse if you don't want to have to trash them, but you ARE going to have seeded bud to some point.
 
dextr0

dextr0

You can pull the nanners and use reverse if you don't want to have to trash them, but you ARE going to have seeded bud to some point.
^^^Not necessarily tru. I had a hermi last grow, took nanners off and kept rollin. No seeds.

That said the probability of not having seeds is not very good if you have a hermi in any room. Depends on how u want to do and the risks u willing to take.
 

swisscheese

Guest
There is a Dutch Master product called 'reverse' and it will help prevent if you are still early enough before the seeds start. You can pull the nanners and use reverse if you don't want to have to trash them, but you ARE going to have seeded bud to some point.

Reverse I am skeptical on as I had nanners after 2 applications on multiple plants, almost right after.
 
L

lil miss lone

I don't think you are using reverse correctly. I've never used it, but the hydro-shop guy explained that it will help a plant go into reveg from flowering. I too thought it was for reversing a plants gender, like that silver stuff.

Edit: just read up on the reverse and it seems that the hydro guy told me wrong (or I missunderstood) Seems it is for spraying male flowers that pop up. Learn something new everyday.
 
B

Baddog

Well I Chopped them down! Thanks for all the Imput Guys! The determining factor is I run a sealed room, and I do not want to battle male spore in my room! On with the next crop! Thanks again
 

swisscheese

Guest
Well I Chopped them down! Thanks for all the Imput Guys! The determining factor is I run a sealed room, and I do not want to battle male spore in my room! On with the next crop! Thanks again

Good call every day you hesitate is more beans messing your other stuff up. May want to mist the plants with ph adjusted water to nullify any leftover pollen.
 
Dr. Detroit

Dr. Detroit

It could all have been a natural process.

Soma teaches us that late into flower many female plants will throw off a couple of stamens to get an emergency batch of seeds out before the end of the growth cycle. He uses these plants to make natural feminized seeds, since any pollen will be from a female plant with an XX chromosome pollinating another XX female plant (even herself). Not necessarily a bad thing at all.

With there just being a couple of stamens in a sea of pistils that would be my guess. True hermaphrodites have many of both types of sexual organs, while natural feminization only has a very few male flowers.
 
johnursery

johnursery

i have to dissagree that its not a bad thing at all, i think its a terrible trait and it shouldnt be allowed to continue!!! i have only had 1 TRUE hermi in my years of growing, but females that throw pollen sacs is so common its disturbing, and that trait has ruined good strains because its so hard to breed out...
 
Dr. Detroit

Dr. Detroit

i have to dissagree that its not a bad thing at all, i think its a terrible trait and it shouldnt be allowed to continue!!! i have only had 1 TRUE hermi in my years of growing, but females that throw pollen sacs is so common its disturbing, and that trait has ruined good strains because its so hard to breed out...


"My green thumb came only as a result of the mistakes I made while learning to see things from the plant's point of view."
-H. Fred Dale


Being a last-chance natural survival trait, I don't suppose that it would be possible (or even slightly intelligent) to attempt to try and breed out that certain mechanism. It is our duty as the preservationists of cannabis genetics to both understand our plants and to appreciate them for what they are. To artificially select that trait out of the genepool would be to destroy an important survival tactic that's likely persisted for many millennia for very good reason.

Good breeding accounts for more than just potency, flavor, vigor, and appearance. 'Quality' is a difficult and very open-to-interpretation word, but it's the only one that fits. Breeding is an art, but it is an art deeply informed by science.

Please read this article:

When breeding fine cannabis it is paramount to remember that we are not trying to do anything but improve the quality of the plant. Haphazardly removing important traits that we don't fully understand is as ignorant an approach as one may have when attempting to become a breeder.

Remember the Texas Strain.
 
johnursery

johnursery

i agree that this trait may have been vital to the plants survival in the past, and i agree that we need to preserve our base genetics...however this trait is an unwanted guest in our hybrids it persits in, it also seems its more prevalent in some hybrids than in alot of landraces which seems backwards to me...its a hard trait to get rid of and since some people think this constitutes responsible feminized breeding its become even more common
some strains it only happens after its mature but thats become the minority, most of the time you see this trait persist threwout flowering, how does that help anyone whos growing this plant for themselves?
 
Dr. Detroit

Dr. Detroit

i agree that this trait may have been vital to the plants survival in the past, and i agree that we need to preserve our base genetics...however this trait is an unwanted guest in our hybrids it persits in, it also seems its more prevalent in some hybrids than in alot of landraces which seems backwards to me...its a hard trait to get rid of and since some people think this constitutes responsible feminized breeding its become even more common
some strains it only happens after its mature but thats become the minority, most of the time you see this trait persist threwout flowering, how does that help anyone whos growing this plant for themselves?


Don't forget my opening quotation: "...the plants point of view".

We've been hybridizing for generations now for sensimilla plants. We've been purposely exaggerating the sexuality of them in a way also; the swollen pistillates, the aromatic terpenes, and the high calyx-to-leaf ratio. These traits which are the result of many generations of artificial selection all are unnatural to the plant itself. The landraces are less susceptible to the late-flower stamen response because they've been allowed to develop in a natural climate, free from our influence (mostly). With no last-ditch desperate need to reproduce a few offspring (like you get with sensimilla), landrace strains need no such mechanism.

Basically, the artificial selection of breeders has forced some cannabis plants to restrategize their survival tactics. Any viable seeds produced by any means the plant can manage counts as a success to the plant, as long as the genes are passed. The trait will not only persist, it will become more common in the future (as long as people plant the seeds).

I've only personally ever seen this trait on very over-mature plants. It's possible that a temperature or humidity irregularity may be contributing to any stamen development earlier in the growth cycle. I recall that the early Thai's grown in these latitudes were often hermie, but that was before my time. It's possible that their progeny are the cause of all of this.

I've only personally ever had a single true hermaphrodite plant in all of my years. Nearly every report I've ever heard of a hermie ends up being this late-sensimilla stamen response, and I've never seen it happen earlier than about the seventh week of flowering either, so I can't really comment on your assertion that it's becoming more common earlier in development since I haven't observed that myself.

Whenever I really want to preserve something that won't clone well I always employ the late-sensimilla stamen technique to make a few seeds. Being an all organic guy, it's an invaluable tool.
 
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