Natural organic soil or store bought/bio buzz?

  • Thread starter AnonyMice
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A

AnonyMice

3
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Hi. I will be growing my first crop in a spot I have found overgrown with brambles and nettles. I realised the soil seems very dark and feels crumbly in texture but also holds together when squeezed like play dough. I went unequipped with any tools so only had a quick visual sample of the top soil. Im assuming if I turn over a few inches the soil will hopefully keep getting better and better? My question is, Can I use this soil? My plan was to buy biobizz light mix and add whatever nutrients required, growing in large fabric pots but if I can use the earth around me it’s obviously going to be less hassle in the long run.. I don’t drive so it would allow me to grow more plants too.. not having to heave bags of soil to the area trying to be discreet lol.
Any input would be appreciated, and thank you in advance.

- This will be my first grow ever, I’m still learning. Preparing my site in the coming weeks.

will attach photos of soil if that helps. Im at lat 54. Will be growing Dutch photoperiods as was informed they will outstand any hardy weather my countries prone too.

8AD63648 8F01 4250 92F6 5AC4F26DE544
D1CF1A4B 3A7F 49FE 8E73 23DED2628637
 
mancorn

mancorn

1,142
163
No reason to haul in a bunch of dirt if the soil looks good. Also no need to turn the soil as it will do more harm to your soil food web (relationship between all the critters and nutrients). I’d start in cups or 1g nursery (which are really only .7g) and then just dig your earth holes the size of your containers when you transplant. You can always top feed with organics (which take a number of weeks/months to become plant available) or synthetics for a quick fix if you have deficiencies down the road.
 
A

AnonyMice

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Thanks! So you wouldn’t recommend using fabric pots using the soil there but instead planting directly into ground? I’ll be combatting 10ft high thorns/brambles to create my garden and wondering if I’ll be left with any alternative than turning soil after all the debris that will need clearing. Suppose I’ll take it as it comes and see what seems practical at the time. I’m not opposed to using chemicals if it will help the plant/yield
 
A

AnonyMice

3
1
Thanks! So you wouldn’t recommend using fabric pots using the soil there but instead planting directly into ground? I’ll be combatting 10ft high thorns/brambles to create my garden and wondering if I’ll be left with any alternative than turning soil after all the debris that will need clearing. Suppose I’ll take it as it comes and see what seems practical at the time. I’m not opposed to using chemicals if it will help the plant/yield
10ft maybe exaggerating but they are seemingly twice the height of me! (5’10ish) 😂
 
J

jim59

12
3
No reason to haul in a bunch of dirt if the soil looks good. Also no need to turn the soil as it will do more harm to your soil food web (relationship between all the critters and nutrients). I’d start in cups or 1g nursery (which are really only .7g) and then just dig your earth holes the size of your containers when you transplant. You can always top feed with organics (which take a number of weeks/months to become plant available) or synthetics for a quick fix if you have deficiencies down the road.
start your seeds in ice cream cones that way no need to transplant just put cone in the ground after germination and the cone will feed worms and dissolve
 

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