New to the site, opinions needed

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Jsvoboda

Jsvoboda

That's a colorimeter. It looks at the color of a substance.
Lots of industrial process controls will use some kind of colorimeter but critical processes will require frequent calibration. We have one in the lab that is calibrated every time we use it but it's a built in part of the process of using the machine. As long as your not looking for super accuracy, it probably not that necessary but some calibration must be needed.
 
Aqua Man

Aqua Man

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Hello Aqua Man, could describe how you would amend the soil in this instance? Asking because I don't know.
Simply adding lime to the soil in the proper amounts. Almost all soils are already buffered when we buy them.

The lime breaks down over time and becomes soluable slowly. Only soluable elements will effect PH. So as it slowly breaks down it will provide a continuous buffer... peat on the other hand is acidic as it breaks down. This is why most soils we buy have soil, peat and lime added to give a nice stable ph over time that does not need adjusted. If you ph the nutrients and feed it has little to no impact on the ph of the nutrient solution once in the soil.

 
Flexnerb

Flexnerb

Maybe it's not needed. Do you put it in water to zero it or anything like that?
Nope two step process..water goes in red led turns on measures color then second step is open cuvette after pulling it out of tester then the drops of reagent and put cuvette back in push button then bing bango...thats it...clean cuvettes after each use....they get discolored if you leave the previously talked about end solution in them for too long....

My alk is 360...
 
Jsvoboda

Jsvoboda

Nope two step process..water goes in red led turns on measures color then second step is open cuvette after pulling it out of tester then the drops of reagent and put cuvette back in push button then bing bango...thats it...clean cuvettes after each use....they get discolored if you leave the previously talked about end solution in them for too long....

My alk is 360...
That first step is like a calibration. The reagent cause the color change. So the first is basically a "zero" for the meter. The reagent makes it change color and the machine quantifies the difference. That's a pretty good process for that little device.
 
Jsvoboda

Jsvoboda

That first step is like a calibration. The reagent cause the color change. So the first is basically a "zero" for the meter. The reagent makes it change color and the machine quantifies the difference. That's a pretty good process for that little device.
Be careful though. Anything that causes a color change can change your readings. Some chemicals will interfere with the reagent reaction but this is probably not an issue in your application.
 
Jsvoboda

Jsvoboda

Simply adding lime to the soil in the proper amounts. Almost all soils are already buffered when we buy them.

The lime breaks down over time and becomes soluable slowly. Only soluable elements will effect PH. So as it slowly breaks down it will provide a continuous buffer... peat on the other hand is acidic as it breaks down. This is why most soils we buy have soil, peat and lime added to give a nice stable ph over time that does not need adjusted. If you ph the nutrients and feed it has little to no impact on the ph of the nutrient solution once in the soil.

 
Flexnerb

Flexnerb

Be careful though. Anything that causes a color change can change your readings. Some chemicals will interfere with the reagent reaction but this is probably not an issue in your application.
I think iron can throw it off...thought i read that some where....could be wrong..
 

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