Older Soil

  • Thread starter CannabisJack
  • Start date
  • Tagged users None
CannabisJack

CannabisJack

if you were to open a bag of “hot” soil and allow it to dry out would you lose nutrients that way?

Never tried this experiment, but would like to have feedback if someone knows the answer or has tried this and what their results might have been.
 
oldskol4evr

oldskol4evr

if you were to open a bag of “hot” soil and allow it to dry out would you lose nutrients that way?

Never tried this experiment, but would like to have feedback if someone knows the answer or has tried this and what their results might have been.
depends on your weather,i cook my soil in totes,only water them about a month before im gonna plant,only water besides that is condensation from the lid,mine are in direct sunlight all day and sweat like a bitch when the soil cools as the sun goes down,from just that no it wont leach all the goodness from the tote there in,but if you dry it out in direct sunlight and it in the weather yes ,from rain and or humidity,it would go about inch in and dry,that would send the nutrients out in my opinion,if it getting rained on like it does from these box stores,the nutes are gone already unless you get a bag direct off the truck,when you get into a stack and under some bags it has wet compost,it been rained on ,so during transport who know how many days been in ice sleet ,snow or rain if you dig,the fresh stuff is the stuff up high on the shelves,you get the reasoning,you could and even covered you dont know what you have unless you make it your self
 
oldskol4evr

oldskol4evr

depends on your weather,i cook my soil in totes,only water them about a month before im gonna plant,only water besides that is condensation from the lid,mine are in direct sunlight all day and sweat like a bitch when the soil cools as the sun goes down,from just that no it wont leach all the goodness from the tote there in,but if you dry it out in direct sunlight and it in the weather yes ,from rain and or humidity,it would go about inch in and dry,that would send the nutrients out in my opinion,if it getting rained on like it does from these box stores,the nutes are gone already unless you get a bag direct off the truck,when you get into a stack and under some bags it has wet compost,it been rained on ,so during transport who know how many days been in ice sleet ,snow or rain if you dig,the fresh stuff is the stuff up high on the shelves,you get the reasoning,you could and even covered you dont know what you have unless you make it your self
if it has a peat base it will leach pretty quick being wet,and wet wet covered will bring compaction,and that be some smelly shit,so best to let it take it course in a closed tote with holes in the bottom and let it not dry out but stay fresh and fluffy ,that new fox farm soil that has the bulldog on the front that some potent shit,so much ewc you cant hardly wash it off your skin and it is a re amend for your soil,good shit had great luck re amending with it for the veggie garden,on it on with more peat would make a quick super soil,i dont think seedlings could handle it,never got around to trying some in my medicine pots,i was gonna try it like sub cool recipe in the bottom,just to answer your own question do a NPK test on it and document ,then when your ready to use do it again and there will be no guess work if you dig,i did a test on the bulldog bag,ph was 6.5 N was surplus,P was adequate,K was sufficient,good stuff i think at transplant right into the stuff and see
 
CannabisJack

CannabisJack

Bagged potting soil starts breaking down right after mixing. Organic type soil like ocean forest is considered fresh and with full nutrient content for 6 months after bagging. And peat light mixes like pro mix one year. After that wetting agents and lime content will be degraded.
So, if I were to open a bag of soil such as pro-mix or fox farm and allowed it to dry out (not even use the soil) you don’t think it would lose to much of its nutrients?
 
but just in case I would reamend it a little and moist it again,leave it few hours/days somewhere shaded before I use it.Soil's life could die if it fully dries out.I think it wont loose to much of its nutrients,ofcourse it wont be like fresh one but still usable and nice.You could also mix it with another that is more fresh and wet......
 
Jimster

Jimster

Supporter
Growing mediums won't lose their nutrients simply by drying out. They would need to be rinsed to remove the stuff that they added, and even then you would probably only get half of it out, especially if any timed release components are added. If the soil is allowed to dry, any water soluble ingredients have the chance of becoming concentrated and possibly harming roots... but simply drying it out doesn't change anything that has been added to it, with the exception of biological additions, such as the Mycoxxxxx (I can't think of or spell the mushroom/fungus culture, but some Promix has it added).
 
MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

Growing mediums won't lose their nutrients simply by drying out. They would need to be rinsed to remove the stuff that they added, and even then you would probably only get half of it out, especially if any timed release components are added. If the soil is allowed to dry, any water soluble ingredients have the chance of becoming concentrated and possibly harming roots... but simply drying it out doesn't change anything that has been added to it, with the exception of biological additions, such as the Mycoxxxxx (I can't think of or spell the mushroom/fungus culture, but some Promix has it added).

. https://www.pthorticulture.com/en/training-center/10-must-know-growing-media-facts/
 
CannabisJack

CannabisJack

I think this is the answer to the question
Thanks MIMedGrower for the link.

Microbes in the growing media can potentially consume the fertilizer charge, especially nitrogen and iron. This may explain why crops planted in aged growing media get off to a slower start. These processes occur more rapidly with hot storage temperatures than with cold.

Product aging begins the day the growing media is manufactured. Most manufacturers print a manufacturing date on the package. If you use packaged growing media, check with the manufacturer for this date. If you mix your own, keep records for the day you mixed it. The best use of a typical packaged peat-based growing media is eight to nine months during the summer months and 10 to 12 months through colder, winter months. Growing media components that have been composted contain a high population of microorganisms that can also consume the wetting agent. Therefore, packaged growing media containing bark and compost have a shorter best-use date of four to six months.

Some additives incorporated into growing media are more critical for the best-use date. Growing media that contain controlled-release fertilizers should be used within one month of the manufacturing date due to the release of fertilizer within the package. Some fungal-based biofungicides have a shelf life of a few months when incorporated into the growing media; however, most bacteria-based biofungicides and mycorrhizae can last more than a year.
 
Jimster

Jimster

Supporter
I think this is the answer to the question
Thanks MIMedGrower for the link.

Microbes in the growing media can potentially consume the fertilizer charge, especially nitrogen and iron. This may explain why crops planted in aged growing media get off to a slower start. These processes occur more rapidly with hot storage temperatures than with cold.

Product aging begins the day the growing media is manufactured. Most manufacturers print a manufacturing date on the package. If you use packaged growing media, check with the manufacturer for this date. If you mix your own, keep records for the day you mixed it. The best use of a typical packaged peat-based growing media is eight to nine months during the summer months and 10 to 12 months through colder, winter months. Growing media components that have been composted contain a high population of microorganisms that can also consume the wetting agent. Therefore, packaged growing media containing bark and compost have a shorter best-use date of four to six months.

Some additives incorporated into growing media are more critical for the best-use date. Growing media that contain controlled-release fertilizers should be used within one month of the manufacturing date due to the release of fertilizer within the package. Some fungal-based biofungicides have a shelf life of a few months when incorporated into the growing media; however, most bacteria-based biofungicides and mycorrhizae can last more than a year.
Great article! I use Promix and it is usually pretty dry when I get it, unlike bags of potting soil and similar products. I have used it after sitting around for a few years, and it worked identical to a freshly purchased opened bag. On a similar note that sort of backs up what the original article claims, I had a bale of Promix that got wet. It didn't get soaked by any means, but the outer wrapper was opened and water got in, making everything damp. The Promix also had a slightly musty smell afterwards, so there was mold/mildew present to some degree. I found that the plants grown in the opened/damp bag of Promix showed slower growth than a fresh or older dry bale. Since Promix doesn't have much in the way of nutrients to begin with, the effect was notable. I think Promix is sterilized prior to shipping, and the dry nature of it helps to keep the shelf life long and extended, but for any soil or medium that has any degree of water in it, this is something to keep in mind.
 
CannabisJack

CannabisJack

Great article! I use Promix and it is usually pretty dry when I get it, unlike bags of potting soil and similar products. I have used it after sitting around for a few years, and it worked identical to a freshly purchased opened bag. On a similar note that sort of backs up what the original article claims, I had a bale of Promix that got wet. It didn't get soaked by any means, but the outer wrapper was opened and water got in, making everything damp. The Promix also had a slightly musty smell afterwards, so there was mold/mildew present to some degree. I found that the plants grown in the opened/damp bag of Promix showed slower growth than a fresh or older dry bale. Since Promix doesn't have much in the way of nutrients to begin with, the effect was notable. I think Promix is sterilized prior to shipping, and the dry nature of it helps to keep the shelf life long and extended, but for any soil or medium that has any degree of water in it, this is something to keep in mind.
I’ve never had good luck with pro-mix. Always runs too “hot” unless I’m using the wrong stuff. Their organic blend for vegetables is 30.15.15 which always gives me nitrogen burn.
 
Jimster

Jimster

Supporter
I’ve never had good luck with pro-mix. Always runs too “hot” unless I’m using the wrong stuff. Their organic blend for vegetables is 30.15.15 which always gives me nitrogen burn.
I think you might be confusing this with something else, although there are a bunch of Promix varieties. The Promix that I use comes in either bales or bagged, although the bales are compressed and will fill about 7 or 8 buckets. Here is the stuff I was talking about:


There are a bunch of em out there... this is pretty much neutral as far as nutrients go.
 
MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

Great article! I use Promix and it is usually pretty dry when I get it, unlike bags of potting soil and similar products. I have used it after sitting around for a few years, and it worked identical to a freshly purchased opened bag. On a similar note that sort of backs up what the original article claims, I had a bale of Promix that got wet. It didn't get soaked by any means, but the outer wrapper was opened and water got in, making everything damp. The Promix also had a slightly musty smell afterwards, so there was mold/mildew present to some degree. I found that the plants grown in the opened/damp bag of Promix showed slower growth than a fresh or older dry bale. Since Promix doesn't have much in the way of nutrients to begin with, the effect was notable. I think Promix is sterilized prior to shipping, and the dry nature of it helps to keep the shelf life long and extended, but for any soil or medium that has any degree of water in it, this is something to keep in mind.

Pro mix is not sterilized. And you said its a great article then ignored the info that says to use pro mix in one year before it had broken down and cant be guaranteed to hold water properly or stable ph even before that depending on storage.

Here is why it is not sterilized. I am not a fan of myth and mis-information. When i am wrong I expect to be corrected so...

 
GDub51

GDub51

if it has a peat base it will leach pretty quick being wet,and wet wet covered will bring compaction,and that be some smelly shit,so best to let it take it course in a closed tote with holes in the bottom and let it not dry out but stay fresh and fluffy ,that new fox farm soil that has the bulldog on the front that some potent shit,so much ewc you cant hardly wash it off your skin and it is a re amend for your soil,good shit had great luck re amending with it for the veggie garden,on it on with more peat would make a quick super soil,i dont think seedlings could handle it,never got around to trying some in my medicine pots,i was gonna try it like sub cool recipe in the bottom,just to answer your own question do a NPK test on it and document ,then when your ready to use do it again and there will be no guess work if you dig,i did a test on the bulldog bag,ph was 6.5 N was surplus,P was adequate,K was sufficient,good stuff i think at transplant right into the stuff and see
Can you say run on sentence?
Growing mediums won't lose their nutrients simply by drying out. They would need to be rinsed to remove the stuff that they added, and even then you would probably only get half of it out, especially if any timed release components are added. If the soil is allowed to dry, any water soluble ingredients have the chance of becoming concentrated and possibly harming roots... but simply drying it out doesn't change anything that has been added to it, with the exception of biological additions, such as the Mycoxxxxx (I can't think of or spell the mushroom/fungus culture, but some Promix has it added).
I agree. I contacted Fox Farm about some left over I had that had developed a green mold on it. Fox Farm said if it bothered me I could leave it in the sun for a few then just turn it under to mix in. They were no afraid of anything growing on it, felt it was natural and just to "burn" it off if I wanted to if I was paranoid about it. IF it kills me I guess you won't be hearing from me anymore.....probably just another form of mycorrhizae.
 
oldskol4evr

oldskol4evr

Can you say run on sentence?

I agree. I contacted Fox Farm about some left over I had that had developed a green mold on it. Fox Farm said if it bothered me I could leave it in the sun for a few then just turn it under to mix in. They were no afraid of anything growing on it, felt it was natural and just to "burn" it off if I wanted to if I was paranoid about it. IF it kills me I guess you won't be hearing from me anymore.....probably just another form of mycorrhizae.
no one made you read it,that was your choice smart ass,scroll on down next time
 
Jimster

Jimster

Supporter
Pro mix is not sterilized. And you said its a great article then ignored the info that says to use pro mix in one year before it had broken down and cant be guaranteed to hold water properly or stable ph even before that depending on storage.

Here is why it is not sterilized. I am not a fan of myth and mis-information. When i am wrong I expect to be corrected so...

Thank you for the correction. I thought almost all commercialized and inoculated mediums had to be sterilized as part of their manufacture, but I'm obviously wrong on this one. I was thinking along the lines of mushroom manure and stuff that is all sterilized before being inoculated with the mushroom spawn. All of this led me to spend some time on the Promix site, which has grown a bit since I first started using their products. They now have a TON of different mixes and compositions available. When I would recommend Promix, it was like recommending fertilizer...yeah, but what kind? Exactly, they now have a dozen or more types, although just about any would work. Most are specialized for high drainage/low drainage, different sized contents, plus some plant stimulants. I need to be more careful when recommending this, since there is a dozen different types in a bunch of different sizes. I guess the Promx BX is what I always used, but newer additions included a few extra plant protectors. It works well and never had any problems. But it is NOT sterile!:cool:
 
Top Bottom