Persistent broad leaf herbicides end up in your organic compost via contaminated horse manure.

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Side

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Good day all, I'm new here but not new to growing.

Problem.
Persistent broad leaf herbicides are compounds that have been formulated by manufacturers too resist biological degradation (take years to break down even after passing through a horse or cows digestive system), a few examples are Aminopyralid, Clopyralid and Picloram. They are used in pastures and on grain crops, to keep broad leaf weeds out. I have now read about Persistent broad leaf herbicides and the damage it has done to organic vegetable gardens. There are many videos and articles about this, and the main instruction is know your source, but that is not always possible.

Link with a great explanation
Here is a link with an explanation of my serious concern. https://www.the-compost-gardener.com/picloram.html
Here are articles published by the US composting council and one from the National Pesticide Information centre. https://old.compostingcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/USCC-PH-Fact-Sheet-2-for-web.pdf
Can I use compost contaminated with clopyralid or other herbicides?

My story
Unfortunately before I knew about this herbicide I added a load of horse manure from a local horse rescue organisation to my compost. I asked and they do not use anything like this on their pastures, but are unsure if the farmers of their grain crops they purchase in do, as they get it from an agri co-op. I have now removed all the horse manure (Luckily it was the top layer) from my compost, but obviously some remains. I know how to do a bioassay test to test for this, but I am still seriously concerned and do not want to waste my lovely organic compost I have taken a year or more to build. That said I will now never again bring anything onto my land, even store bought bagged compost and manures can have traces of this herbicide in it.

Question
If these persistent herbicides unknowingly make their way into your organic compost, can they affect the growth of your cannabis in any way if you use that compost on your following seasons cannabis grow?

If these herbicides are present in so called organic composts or manures will they affect my cannabis grow in any way, as I already know they affect broad leaf vegetable grows. I claim I am a 100% organic grower but brought this untraceable manures in, so am I really an organic grower?

Hoping you have a Wonderfull day all.

Regards

Side
 
LoveGrowingIt

LoveGrowingIt

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If these persistent herbicides unknowingly make their way into your organic compost, can they affect the growth of your cannabis in any way if you use that compost on your following seasons cannabis grow?
I do my best to keep the outside growing separate from the inside growing for more reasons than avoidance of herbicides, but that's a good reason. I have some nice compost outside, and it will stay outside. We can get truckloads of free compost where I live, but I don't use it inside. I only use it for my non-edible outside gardening.

If these herbicides are present in so called organic composts or manures will they affect my cannabis grow in any way, as I already know they affect broad leaf vegetable grows. I claim I am a 100% organic grower but brought this untraceable manures in, so am I really an organic grower?
I don't know, but I wouldn't risk it if I had a choice. We do what we can, but we can't control everything. Contaminants and pollutants are pervasive. I'm trying to reuse my soil and am fortunate to have a place inside where I can work with my soil. When it's not being used to grow, it's composting.
 
S

Side

8
3
I do my best to keep the outside growing separate from the inside growing for more reasons than avoidance of herbicides, but that's a good reason. I have some nice compost outside, and it will stay outside. We can get truckloads of free compost where I live, but I don't use it inside. I only use it for my non-edible outside gardening.


I don't know, but I wouldn't risk it if I had a choice. We do what we can, but we can't control everything. Contaminants and pollutants are pervasive. I'm trying to reuse my soil and am fortunate to have a place inside where I can work with my soil. When it's not being used to grow, it's composting.

LGI,

I only grow outdoors, organically in 200 litres bags (53 gal), I prepare organic compost 1 year and use it in my next years grow.
That said going forward, I will never bring any matter onto my land that is don't not have 100% traceability.

Thanks for the reply,
 
Oldchucky

Oldchucky

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Have anything going now? About harvest time! Any pictures? And welcome!
 
Oldchucky

Oldchucky

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Awesome side! Thanks for posting them! I dabble a little in the outdoor arts myself! Then play with it all winter! Looks like you got it going on! It’s always interesting to see folks growing in other parts of the world! I am in the northern Sacramento Valley in California! Super hot and dry! Wouldn’t have it any other way! Lol! Making some dry sift hash as we speak! What a coincidence! Hope you keep posting pics every once in a while so we can see the progress! As you slam them across the finish line! Take it easy!
 
S

Side

8
3
Awesome side! Thanks for posting them! I dabble a little in the outdoor arts myself! Then play with it all winter! Looks like you got it going on! It’s always interesting to see folks growing in other parts of the world! I am in the northern Sacramento Valley in California! Super hot and dry! Wouldn’t have it any other way! Lol! Making some dry sift hash as we speak! What a coincidence! Hope you keep posting pics every once in a while so we can see the progress! As you slam them across the finish line! Take it easy!
Oldchunky,

I live on the southern tip of Africa, in Cape Town near Cape Point. We have a Mediterranean climate here, hot dry summers, with mildly cold wet winters (the average coldest it will get in winter is 50F). The only problem I encounter growing outdoors is we have 2 seriously strong winds here. The South Easter in summer and the North Wester in winter, for that reason its known as the Cape of Storms by the maritime fraternity.

The "Cape Doctor" is the local name for the strong south easterly summer wind, it blows on and off on the Southern African coast from spring too late summer (September to March). It is known as the Cape Doctor because of a local belief that it clears Cape Town of pollution and germs.

The south easter actually can blow so hard it topped a few of my cannabis trees this grow, but all good they needed topping.

Cannabis was legalised in South Africa in 2018, we are allowed to grow 4 plants in a single adult residential home and 8 plants if 2 adults live on the property. We can have 1.2kgs (2,64lbs) of flower at home at any time, but selling is prohibited. So no need for anymore gorilla grows, haha.

Have a great day,

Side
 
Dadman86

Dadman86

753
243
Good day all, I'm new here but not new to growing.

Problem.
Persistent broad leaf herbicides are compounds that have been formulated by manufacturers too resist biological degradation (take years to break down even after passing through a horse or cows digestive system), a few examples are Aminopyralid, Clopyralid and Picloram. They are used in pastures and on grain crops, to keep broad leaf weeds out. I have now read about Persistent broad leaf herbicides and the damage it has done to organic vegetable gardens. There are many videos and articles about this, and the main instruction is know your source, but that is not always possible.

Link with a great explanation
Here is a link with an explanation of my serious concern. https://www.the-compost-gardener.com/picloram.html
Here are articles published by the US composting council and one from the National Pesticide Information centre. https://old.compostingcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/USCC-PH-Fact-Sheet-2-for-web.pdf
Can I use compost contaminated with clopyralid or other herbicides?

My story
Unfortunately before I knew about this herbicide I added a load of horse manure from a local horse rescue organisation to my compost. I asked and they do not use anything like this on their pastures, but are unsure if the farmers of their grain crops they purchase in do, as they get it from an agri co-op. I have now removed all the horse manure (Luckily it was the top layer) from my compost, but obviously some remains. I know how to do a bioassay test to test for this, but I am still seriously concerned and do not want to waste my lovely organic compost I have taken a year or more to build. That said I will now never again bring anything onto my land, even store bought bagged compost and manures can have traces of this herbicide in it.

Question
If these persistent herbicides unknowingly make their way into your organic compost, can they affect the growth of your cannabis in any way if you use that compost on your following seasons cannabis grow?

If these herbicides are present in so called organic composts or manures will they affect my cannabis grow in any way, as I already know they affect broad leaf vegetable grows. I claim I am a 100% organic grower but brought this untraceable manures in, so am I really an organic grower?

Hoping you have a Wonderfull day all.

Regards

Side
I was going to go knock on these people door that have horses locked in there yard. I figured they wouldn't mind me grabbing some dookie. I see they also have fields and grow something. What about cow turds?
I'm close to a farm got a bunch of heifers in there farm. I don't think they plant fields.
 
Dadman86

Dadman86

753
243
LGI,

I only grow outdoors, organically in 200 litres bags (53 gal), I prepare organic compost 1 year and use it in my next years grow.
That said going forward, I will never bring any matter onto my land that is don't not have 100% traceability.

Thanks for the reply,
Disappointed now. I already started collecting coffee grounds and fruit scraps. That was the plan compost and next year have some fire business right in the yard
 
Dadman86

Dadman86

753
243
Good day all, I'm new here but not new to growing.

Problem.
Persistent broad leaf herbicides are compounds that have been formulated by manufacturers too resist biological degradation (take years to break down even after passing through a horse or cows digestive system), a few examples are Aminopyralid, Clopyralid and Picloram. They are used in pastures and on grain crops, to keep broad leaf weeds out. I have now read about Persistent broad leaf herbicides and the damage it has done to organic vegetable gardens. There are many videos and articles about this, and the main instruction is know your source, but that is not always possible.

Link with a great explanation
Here is a link with an explanation of my serious concern. https://www.the-compost-gardener.com/picloram.html
Here are articles published by the US composting council and one from the National Pesticide Information centre. https://old.compostingcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/USCC-PH-Fact-Sheet-2-for-web.pdf
Can I use compost contaminated with clopyralid or other herbicides?

My story
Unfortunately before I knew about this herbicide I added a load of horse manure from a local horse rescue organisation to my compost. I asked and they do not use anything like this on their pastures, but are unsure if the farmers of their grain crops they purchase in do, as they get it from an agri co-op. I have now removed all the horse manure (Luckily it was the top layer) from my compost, but obviously some remains. I know how to do a bioassay test to test for this, but I am still seriously concerned and do not want to waste my lovely organic compost I have taken a year or more to build. That said I will now never again bring anything onto my land, even store bought bagged compost and manures can have traces of this herbicide in it.

Question
If these persistent herbicides unknowingly make their way into your organic compost, can they affect the growth of your cannabis in any way if you use that compost on your following seasons cannabis grow?

If these herbicides are present in so called organic composts or manures will they affect my cannabis grow in any way, as I already know they affect broad leaf vegetable grows. I claim I am a 100% organic grower but brought this untraceable manures in, so am I really an organic grower?

Hoping you have a Wonderfull day all.

Regards

Side
Thank you for the info. Bookmarked so I can check out the links.
 
S

Side

8
3
Thank you for the info. Bookmarked so I can check out the links.
DM86,

Im don't live in the US, but here is a quick read with some of the Trade names used in the US with these chemicals in. My question is, will this affect cannabis? We all know this seriously affects broad leaf veggies, but does it affect cannabis, to that question I can find absolutely no info.

https://www.the-compost-gardener.com/picloram.html#:~:text=Trade Names Please&text=These herbicides are sold under,, Reclaim, Redeem, Transline.

Side.
 
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