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Possible nutrient deficiency Mid Flower

Hello all,

First time grower here.

Growing four legal plants in my backyard in BC. I know one is a violator strain, the other three are the same unknown sativa strain.

Growing in the ground with organic soil from a local nursery mixed with 25% peat moss and vermiculite. Then added a premium compost plus bone meal, blood meal, kelp meal, basalt rock dust. I dug big holes in native soil and added this mix to it.

Been adding liquid seaweed and molasses at 1tbsp per gallon every other watering since stretch until I started seeing minor nute burn on tips. Now just straight dechlorinated tap water, ph 7-7.5 and I don't bother ph adjusting as microbes should do that for me.

Now my violator which was always the darkest green is lightening up and a fair amount of yellow leaves with brown tips on older fan leaves but starting to rise up the plant.

Also one of the sativa's is showing purple hues but the other two are not.

Had some trouble with aphids and mites but I treated with safers a few times in stretch and I haven't noticed much damage since then. It's getting colder here and we have had a rainy September. Low of 9c and high of 22c.

Are these deficiencies worth doing anything about? I want to just let them finish and not over react with more nutes at this point in the cycle.

Here are photos

Cheers
 
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They dont look too bad to me. Yellowing from the bottom up is typically a mobile nutrient deficieny, But could be cause by something else preventing uptake like bugs in the roots. I'd have a good look for signs of root aphids or anything just to be sure, although I dont think that's the issue here but always best to check. I'd give them a light feeding of a good balanced organic nutrient. A bit of yellowing isnt that big of a deal, all those leaves are giving their nutrients to the flowers, but you could feed them a little imho, and see how they respond.
 
They dont look too bad to me. Yellowing from the bottom up is typically a mobile nutrient deficieny, But could be cause by something else preventing uptake like bugs in the roots. I'd have a good look for signs of root aphids or anything just to be sure, although I dont think that's the issue here but always best to check. I'd give them a light feeding of a good balanced organic nutrient. A bit of yellowing isnt that big of a deal, all those leaves are giving their nutrients to the flowers, but you could feed them a little imho, and see how they respond.
Cool thanks for feedback I'll check for ground pests. Should I just spray safer insect soap on the ground to be safe? I have some leftover kelp meal (1-0-3), bone meal (4-10-0) and liquid seaweed (0-0-5) that I can use. Any suggestions on how much to add and top dress meals or let them soak in water overnight for a quicker dose?
 
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Couple more photos
just wondering with all the amends you added before putting in the hole,had the soil been cooked?if not like dirt bag said feed them,all you used are good product,but take time to be avaiable to the plant,next if you know your ph is 7-7.5 why not ph down it to 6.5 ,soil does buffer ,but why make it,instead let it focus on the end product if you dig,me at were you are ,i would focus on feed with more K and then split the K amount your using in half for P,like say a 8 for N,18 for P,36 for K for a well balanced meal,when those plants get harvest,leave all the roots and stalk in the ground to build your organic matter,then do a ph slurry test,see what it is,a cheap NPK kit on amazon cost 14 bucks,do a NPK test,when done you know what to add for the coming year,add slow release meals and such and let it cook in the soil while the snow flys,cover bed with plastic to kill weeds and mulch on top will help the cooking part
 
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Yup, use what you have to make up something in the 1-2-3, or 2-3-5 Npk range. Personally I'd make some up and bubble it in a tea overnight then feed it the next day. I'm more of a bottled nute guy though so cant really help with how much of everything to use. I work in EC...
 
I def see interveinal chlorosis.
By the pics it's either a mobile deficiency or a combination of more than one deficiency. looks like Zn/Fe and mayby N to me, could be due to high PH in the media and it correlates with you watering with alkaline water but I cannot know for sure without checking.

Do a slurry test and go from there.
Goodluck
 
just wondering with all the amends you added before putting in the hole,had the soil been cooked?if not like dirt bag said feed them,all you used are good product,but take time to be avaiable to the plant,next if you know your ph is 7-7.5 why not ph down it to 6.5 ,soil does buffer ,but why make it,instead let it focus on the end product if you dig,me at were you are ,i would focus on feed with more K and then split the K amount your using in half for P,like say a 8 for N,18 for P,36 for K for a well balanced meal,when those plants get harvest,leave all the roots and stalk in the ground to build your organic matter,then do a ph slurry test,see what it is,a cheap NPK kit on amazon cost 14 bucks,do a NPK test,when done you know what to add for the coming year,add slow release meals and such and let it cook in the soil while the snow flys,cover bed with plastic to kill weeds and mulch on top will help the cooking part
Makes sense thanks. Main reason I don't PH down to 6.5 is because I thought that it messes with the symbiotic relationship between the microbes and the roots because of the phosphoric acid. Lots of people that grow where I'm from claim the water is good enough to just let it sit for 24hrs and use it. But I'm not experienced enough to fact check this stuff and now that there are visual signs something is off I'll start PH down to 6.5 from here.

I picked up a soil test kit for like 10 bucks and the test showed my soil is very low in N, low in P, and moderate in K. PH was 6.5 for the indica plant yellowing but 7 for the healthiest looking sativa ( lthe tall bushiest one)

I don't have an air stone but have a little pool pump that can circulate the water. In a 5g bucket. Is that good enough to make a tea with kelp, meal, and liquid seaweed at the ratio you mentioned? I was gonna upgrade to an RO system next year and invest in a proper reservoir, air stone and sprayer. Didn't have the funds for it this year.

I did cook the soil for a month while they were growing in 1g pots of the same soil mix. Transplanted June 1st.

Cheers
 
Last edited:
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Makes sense thanks. Main reason I don't PH down to 6.5 is because I thought that it messes with the symbiotic relationship between the microbes and the roots because of the phosphoric acid. Lots of people that grow where I'm from claim the water is good enough to just let it sit for 24hrs and use it. But I'm not experienced enough to fact check this stuff and now that there are visual signs something is off I'll start PH down to 6.5 from here.

I picked up a soil test kit for like 10 bucks and the test showed my soil is very low in N, low in P, and moderate in K. PH was 6.5 for the indica plant yellowing but 7 for the healthiest looking sativa ( lthe tall bushiest one)

I don't have an air stone but have a little pool pump that can circulate the water. In a 5g bucket. Is that good enough to make a tea with kelp, meal, and liquid seaweed at the ratio you mentioned? I was gonna upgrade to an RO system next year and invest in a proper reservoir, air stone and sprayer. Didn't have the funds for it this year.

I did cook the soil for a month while they were growing in 1g pots of the same soil mix. Transplanted June 1st.

Cheers
i went to wal; mart got a fish air pump,came with 2 air pots and 2 stones,i used 2 of these with 4 stones for years to make my tea,20 bucks a pump,if you dont have clorine or cloramine in your water,you dont need to let it sit for 24 hrs,there talking about gas off of clorine,tea you can make anerobic tea in just 5 gal bucket,let it steep in the sun a few days and feed with it,the air makes it aerobic and foam is produced from it,all kind of ways for broke folk like me,i just mentioned a few,im not saying you have to ph down the water but why not if you check it anyway ,i hope you do,well water can swing up or down with weatrher changes all i was saying
 
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also i wouldnt try to fix the soil ,your getting close so dont disturb,just supplment to harvest you dig what im saying,after harvest then work your soil,if you need help holler maybe i can intro you into slow release amends like i use,gypsum is my top choice,kelp and all you mentioned is great but as you see they peter out,look into slow release meals that take at least 6 months to break down to be available to your plants for the long haul
 
Makes sense thanks. Main reason I don't PH down to 6.5 is because I thought that it messes with the symbiotic relationship between the microbes and the roots because of the phosphoric acid. Lots of people that grow where I'm from claim the water is good enough to just let it sit for 24hrs and use it. But I'm not experienced enough to fact check this stuff and now that there are visual signs something is off I'll start PH down to 6.5 from here.

I picked up a soil test kit for like 10 bucks and the test showed my soil is very low in N, low in P, and moderate in K. PH was 6.5 for the indica plant yellowing but 7 for the healthiest looking sativa ( lthe tall bushiest one)

I don't have an air stone but have a little pool pump that can circulate the water. In a 5g bucket. Is that good enough to make a tea with kelp, meal, and liquid seaweed at the ratio you mentioned? I was gonna upgrade to an RO system next year and invest in a proper reservoir, air stone and sprayer. Didn't have the funds for it this year.

I did cook the soil for a month while they were growing in 1g pots of the same soil mix. Transplanted June 1st.

Cheers
Relying on the microbial life in the media to adjust the acidity so it'll be perfectly balanced is not for new growers IMO.
Which kind of test did you use?
 
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I would strongly caution against using anaerobic tea made with a pump. The bacteria that can breed in anaerobic environments often produce nasty stuff like alcohols and acetone. I'm not saying it cant be done, just that it's easy for it to go wrong and the consequences can easily be sick or dead plants.

Always better to make a highly aerated aerobic compost tea. Or just pre soak all your amendments in water for a few hours before applying.
 
i went to wal; mart got a fish air pump,came with 2 air pots and 2 stones,i used 2 of these with 4 stones for years to make my tea,20 bucks a pump,if you dont have clorine or cloramine in your water,you dont need to let it sit for 24 hrs,there talking about gas off of clorine,tea you can make anerobic tea in just 5 gal bucket,let it steep in the sun a few days and feed with it,the air makes it aerobic and foam is produced from it,all kind of ways for broke folk like me,i just mentioned a few,im not saying you have to ph down the water but why not if you check it anyway ,i hope you do,well water can swing up or down with weatrher changes all i was saying
Right on I'll grab an air stone from Walmart and let it brew up tonight. Appreciate the feedback and glad I came on here as my plan was just to leave it. This year's been a great learning experience. I didn't think these plants would ever fill up that 8 x 8 space so overall I'm stoked with results just don't wanna screw up at the finish line.

Now time for a hoot. Many thanks!!!
 
I would strongly caution against using anaerobic tea made with a pump. The bacteria that can breed in anaerobic environments often produce nasty stuff like alcohols and acetone. I'm not saying it cant be done, just that it's easy for it to go wrong and the consequences can easily be sick or dead plants.

Always better to make a highly aerated aerobic compost tea.
Agreed. anaerobic tea can be dangerous if you're not experienced with teas. ACT is safer.
 
This is the test kit I found. Because it's out of season most garden centers are pretty empty and picked out.

They're little capsules that you add soil 2" deep and then empty capsul and add water to the little vile. Gives you a visual but far from precise.
 
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I would strongly caution against using anaerobic tea made with a pump. The bacteria that can breed in anaerobic environments often produce nasty stuff like alcohols and acetone. I'm not saying it cant be done, just that it's easy for it to go wrong and the consequences can easily be sick or dead plants.

Always better to make a highly aerated aerobic compost tea. Or just pre soak all your amendments in water for a few hours before applying.
i agree ,wasnt saying use anerobic from air,i dont use it,i use air to make my teas and they love it,i need to invest in a scope to check best times ,but im a broke dick,so i go by color of my foam,i use very little molases just for this purpose that stuff have a head running out on the ground by morning hahahah,not to mention all the bugs and other critters that are attracted to it,in 33 gal of tea i use 1/2 cup thats all
 
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This is the test kit I found. Because it's out of season most garden centers are pretty empty and picked out.

They're little capsules that you add soil 2" deep and then empty capsul and add water to the little vile. Gives you a visual but far from precise.
those work fine,but i use them difrent,i put soil in a jar,check my layers for silt sand and clay,after i mark my jar at each level i then take a turkey baster and fill the viles with the settled water inside and do the test,the soil has to be dry to do the ph test,the others have to have fliud,so i take a mason jar quart size,i take several samples and take all the wood rocks and organic matter out,ending with about 2 inches of soil in jar,then i fill the jar to about 1 inch from top with ro water,lid it shake the hell out of it,set in on a level surface and with flash light i take a permanent marker and were the sand has settled i put a mark on jar,wait 1 hour and do the same and mark the silt line,leave 24 hours and then mark the clay line,this is 3 number broke down to precentage of each,with those numbers you go into the soil texture chart ,tells you what type soil your working with,i like sandy loam,the liquid is then used to do NPK test,about 2 hours before you take your liquid sample take a spoon and all that floating on top,get as much as you can out of jar,then let it settle again before testing
 
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Another handy item for making teas is a small aquarium heater. I always got the best tea by bubbling furiously with it set to 82-83F for 24 hrs.
 
This is the test kit I found. Because it's out of season most garden centers are pretty empty and picked out.

They're little capsules that you add soil 2" deep and then empty capsul and add water to the little vile. Gives you a visual but far from precise.
You're using RO water for testing? plus, make sure you sample dirt from the rootzone or closest to it.
Why not a straight forward slurry test?
 

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