revegging stress, help and what-to-do

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Peps

Peps

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Hi guys,about a month agò i transplanted my clones, some switched, i don't know if it's because of the transplant or because i made a bad adaptation. Now they are revegging but they are still stressed (three point leaves, one point leaves ...). should they recover by themselves? how long? can i help them? thanks
WhatsApp Image 2021-07-10 at 23.25.24 (2).jpeg
WhatsApp Image 2021-07-10 at 23.25.24 (1).jpeg
WhatsApp Image 2021-07-10 at 23.25.24.jpeg
 
Frankster

Frankster

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Look like they should recover, but the soil looks really horrible. I hope that's not what's sitting under the plant. Looks like too much gravel, limestone and/or clay.


Is this a photoperiod, or a an auto...

Plus, it's veg season right now, so if they were flowering when you stuck them out there, what where you expecting? If there photo's, they should start flowering for weeks to come...

Need more information.
 
Peps

Peps

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ok, thanks for the reply. the plants are photoperiodic and began to flower after transplanting, I had some problems with irrigation, I planted them in the hottest days of June and many still had weak roots ... however in any case they switched ... I gave them a shot of nitrogen and helped them with Ascophyllum nodosum seaweed extract on the leaves, they have almost all recovered apart from a few. yes, the soil is clayey in some places, but for the most part it is a good soil that is quite sandy and rich as well as being well tilled, it has a calcium deficiency that I am correcting with fertigation

WhatsApp Image 2021-07-10 at 23.46.33.jpeg
 
Frankster

Frankster

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@Frankster what do you think? how much do stressed ones need to recover?
I think lot's of this is going to be strain dependent TBH, some cultivars seem to stress out far more than others in situations like these.

Kinda floored by the pic's, kudos on the monster grow there.

Keep your wet dry cycles proper under that tarp thing you got going on there, and maybe consider hitting them with another shot of microbes, if you haven't done that one already. I would just put something in a big sprayer bottle and go around and hit them at the bases in the evening times, or something.

Fortifying/Protecting that root base, might really help them to recover faster, and give them the added bump to reach into that new soil, make new connections to the nutrients. It's likely that Ascophyllum nodosum seaweed extract had many of these microbes, probably already. I would want to double ensure that your Arbuscular mycorrhiza is developing normally as it should during the transplant period, those are key to explosive growth and overall pant health.


Offering light nute's and microbes should do quite a lot in resolving your issues. I think most of your stressors here are below the soil line TBH, and getting that root base to expand more. I certainly wouldn't be offering much Phosphorus, because it's a big killer of your biome. Keep your veg nutrient regime going for now.

That's a big ass grow, maybe we can get some others to chime in here, and offer up there opinions. I don't want to steer you wrong.

Is this grow coming from out of Oklahoma?
 
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Peps

Peps

29
13
I think lot's of this is going to be strain dependent TBH, some cultivars seem to stress out far more than others in situations like these.

Kinda floored by the pic's, kudos on the monster grow there.

Keep your wet dry cycles proper under that tarp thing you got going on there, and maybe consider hitting them with another shot of microbes, if you haven't done that one already. I would just put something in a big sprayer bottle and go around and hit them at the bases in the evening times, or something.

Fortifying/Protecting that root base, might really help them to recover faster, and give them the added bump to reach into that new soil, make new connections to the nutrients. It's likely that Ascophyllum nodosum seaweed extract had many of these microbes, probably already. I would want to double ensure that your Arbuscular mycorrhiza is developing normally as it should during the transplant period, those are key to explosive growth and overall pant health.


Offering light nute's and microbes should do quite a lot in resolving your issues. I think most of your stressors here are below the soil line TBH, and getting that root base to expand more. I certainly wouldn't be offering much Phosphorus, because it's a big killer of your biome. Keep your veg nutrient regime going for now.

That's a big ass grow, maybe we can get some others to chime in here, and offer up there opinions. I don't want to steer you wrong.

Is this grow coming from out of Oklahoma?
Thank you very much, I'm quite new to this forum I don't know anyone and I don't know how I could get them involved....

This is the first year I've used mulch and I can tell you it's not easy to manage the wet dry cycles, I've probably made a few mistakes.
As for the mycorrhizae, unfortunately I cannot give them because I initially decided to use a systemic fungicide to keep root rot away.
I also gave it back recently because I saw a collapsed plant.
Maybe I should have used the mycorrhizae....
I've noticed too that reveg stress varies a lot depending on the strain, I'm keeping the nutrient regime in veg, I think for at least another 2 weeks

I live in Sardinia 😎
 
Peps

Peps

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IMG_20210711_192036.jpg

This is the plant I was talking about, but it is in another part of the field with plants born from seed. I am currently growing 4 different strains... Im also a young nurseryman 😁
IMG_20210711_192226.jpg
 
Frankster

Frankster

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Thank you very much, I'm quite new to this forum I don't know anyone and I don't know how I could get them involved....

This is the first year I've used mulch and I can tell you it's not easy to manage the wet dry cycles, I've probably made a few mistakes.
As for the mycorrhizae, unfortunately I cannot give them because I initially decided to use a systemic fungicide to keep root rot away.
I also gave it back recently because I saw a collapsed plant.
Maybe I should have used the mycorrhizae....
I've noticed too that reveg stress varies a lot depending on the strain, I'm keeping the nutrient regime in veg, I think for at least another 2 weeks

I live in Sardinia 😎
The AM fungi are integral to any real prolific plant growth, especially when using organic methods and even in hydroponics and/or using salts.

The AM fungi will also solve much of your drought stress issues to a huge degree. How long ago was that fungicide given to the plants? Also, was it applied above in the canopy? or was it given below into the root zone.

Personally, I do some fungal treatments above, (mostly by pH regulation) but I encourage it below the soil line. No doubts it is a key element of most any growing regime IMO, the plants always tend to have problems down the line when AM get out of wack, it seems. Especially when phos is introduced in high levels. Without it, they are way more prone to infestations, and stress.

It might be worthwhile to even try, even if it's a fail. This is the one I recommend above all others. Over 40 microbes in there, but you don't want them up top, only in the root zone, and it mixes like say 5ml to a gallon.... If it spawns, (anywhere) it should colonize the entire root system.
https://www.amazon.com/FoxFarm-Bush...ew+gallon&qid=1626132701&s=lawn-garden&sr=1-4
 
Frankster

Frankster

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How are you irrigating that field? and are you getting full wet dry cycles? ie. Where the ground is (completely) saturated, and then allowed to dry up before the next watering?

Any dry spots in your soil can become a major issue also, because the root zone is only becoming partially saturated. This could become a major issue, especially as the transplants are trying to establish a good root ball.
 
1diesel1

1diesel1

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Planted them in the worst possible time and sent them into a “shock” period resulting in Reveg.
All you can do is ride it out at this point.
keep your eyes out for hermaphrodits,
There’s a good chance of it occurring at this point.
mycorrhizae would have helped immensely to jump start root growth.
Review this, hope it helps.

 
Frankster

Frankster

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Supporter
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Planted them in the worst possible time and sent them into a “shock” period resulting in Reveg.
All you can do is ride it out at this point.
keep your eyes out for hermaphrodits,
There’s a good chance of it occurring at this point.
mycorrhizae would have helped immensely to jump start root growth.
Review this, hope it helps.

Thanks man, I knew you would have a handle on this situation.
 
Peps

Peps

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Is

The AM fungi are integral to any real prolific plant growth, especially when using organic methods and even in hydroponics and/or using salts.

The AM fungi will also solve much of your drought stress issues to a huge degree. How long ago was that fungicide given to the plants? Also, was it applied above in the canopy? or was it given below into the root zone.

Personally, I do some fungal treatments above, (mostly by pH regulation) but I encourage it below the soil line. No doubts it is a key element of most any growing regime IMO, the plants always tend to have problems down the line when AM get out of wack, it seems. Especially when phos is introduced in high levels. Without it, they are way more prone to infestations, and stress.

It might be worthwhile to even try, even if it's a fail. This is the one I recommend above all others. Over 40 microbes in there, but you don't want them up top, only in the root zone, and it mixes like say 5ml to a gallon.... If it spawns, (anywhere) it should colonize the entire root system.
First of all, pardon me for not being able to respond promptly, I am very busy these days.
I gave the fungicide three days ago with the sprayer in the lower part of the plants, how long before I can give the mycorrhizae? is it worth introducing them at this phenological stage?
https://www.amazon.com/FoxFarm-Bush...ew+gallon&qid=1626132701&s=lawn-garden&sr=1-4
 
Peps

Peps

29
13
How are you irrigating that field? and are you getting full wet dry cycles? ie. Where the ground is (completely) saturated, and then allowed to dry up before the next watering?

Any dry spots in your soil can become a major issue also, because the root zone is only becoming partially saturated. This could become a major issue, especially as the transplants are trying to establish a good root ball.
irrigation coincides with fertigation, one hour early in the morning three times a week. one hour is equivalent to about 0.42 gallons per plant... I had problems during transplanting because I could not keep the surface of the soil wet, the plants were out of phase with the drippers and the paper pot arrived with difficulty to the wet part of the soil. most probably they have been stressed and some clones have gone into pre-flowering also because of this.
As for the area where I found the dead plant, tomorrow I will try to move the pipe to the side so that the drop does not fall directly on the beginning of the roots.
 
Peps

Peps

29
13
Planted them in the worst possible time and sent them into a “shock” period resulting in Reveg.
All you can do is ride it out at this point.
keep your eyes out for hermaphrodits,
There’s a good chance of it occurring at this point.
mycorrhizae would have helped immensely to jump start root growth.
Review this, hope it helps.

thanks for the advice bro 🙏 next time I will definitely choose mycorrhizae
 
RealizedReal000

RealizedReal000

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Also just make sure you have an ipm regiment. I’m sure you know this but microscopic pests can also do that to a plant like the wilted one. Just keep a good eye out and maybe put some staked yellow traps near each plant. Can help identify and control most pests before an infestation occurs.
 
Peps

Peps

29
13
Also just make sure you have an ipm regiment. I’m sure you know this but microscopic pests can also do that to a plant like the wilted one. Just keep a good eye out and maybe put some staked yellow traps near each plant. Can help identify and control most pests before an infestation occurs.
you're right, soon I'll put some chromatic traps in each area to keep the pests under control.
The biggest problem I have encountered in recent years here where I live is the Helicoverpa armigera, a lepidopteran that lays its eggs on the buds. Its caterpillars are very fond of inflorescences and furthermore, where they bite, they cause botrytis.
During the flowering period, I am forced to treat weekly with Bacillus thuringiensis.
 
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