sawblade fan leaf

  • Thread starter frogeye
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frogeye

What is the cause of the extreme sawblade leaf?I\ Is it more of a trait towards the area it was origionally from (landrace).Or just a pheno introduced into a broader population of other plants? Ihave seen some plants with a couple extra small sawblade leaves on them but usually only a couple per whole fan leaf.I ran into a crazy smelling male with exaderated sawblade leaves like 8 or 9 per blade anyone have and info on it? thx all peace
 
Seamaiden

Seamaiden

Living dead girl
I know only that different strains/varieties do indeed have differences in the serrations of leaf edges. For instance, the classic Cali O double-serrated leaf margin.

However, either last night or night before last I was watching some show, I think it was on a dinosaur bone pit in Alaska, on the north slope IIRC, and they had tons and tons of fossil plants. So they go through all these experts who explain how they determined climate to within just a couple of degrees Celsius based on, get this, LEAF SERRATION.

Plants that come from tropical, wet climates tend to have predominantly smooth leaf edges. This seems to allow water to shear off and I *think* may have something to do with transpiration. Plants from more temperate climates have predominantly serrated leaf edges, and this has something again to do with transpiration, but I think it's also affected by how cold the winters get in the particular environment. Now I wish I could remember the name of the program and what episode, I'm pretty sure it was on PBS.

AHA! Damn... that sure took some searching: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/arcticdino/

In any event, I think it's a genetic trait carried over, but have no idea how dominant it might be or what might trigger expression.



I ramble. But I see a light at the end of the tunnel and it's not a train!
 
B

bluetooth

I know only that different strains/varieties do indeed have differences in the serrations of leaf edges. For instance, the classic Cali O double-serrated leaf margin.

However, either last night or night before last I was watching some show, I think it was on a dinosaur bone pit in Alaska, on the north slope IIRC, and they had tons and tons of fossil plants. So they go through all these experts who explain how they determined climate to within just a couple of degrees Celsius based on, get this, LEAF SERRATION.

Plants that come from tropical, wet climates tend to have predominantly smooth leaf edges. This seems to allow water to shear off and I *think* may have something to do with transpiration. Plants from more temperate climates have predominantly serrated leaf edges, and this has something again to do with transpiration, but I think it's also affected by how cold the winters get in the particular environment. Now I wish I could remember the name of the program and what episode, I'm pretty sure it was on PBS.

AHA! Damn... that sure took some searching: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/arcticdino/

In any event, I think it's a genetic trait carried over, but have no idea how dominant it might be or what might trigger expression.



I ramble. But I see a light at the end of the tunnel and it's not a train!
nice bit of info:rasta2:
 
F

frogeye

LOL thx seamaiden for the info and even the rambling lol.Thats more like what i meant was the double serration.I was wondering cause it was a pollen chuck i did with a herijuana male and an aliendog female but neither had the trait.And it was the only one of it's kind so i held onto it just in case.I appreciate the info ..peace
 
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