Silicone and hydro!

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Natural

Natural

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I would never add grains to my coco. Grains mold faster than just about anything. Seems like a great way to cause root rot or a fungus infestation.

I use humic acid in my nute mix without any problems. When I tried using Fulvic acid in my nute mix, it just burned the crap out of my plants. When I use Fulvic as a foliar spray, my plants like it. Fulvic is strong stuff, be careful.

ya know giving it some thought...fulvic and KSi might be good to use together in a foliar solution to get the PH just where you want it...given they are an alkaline and an acid.
The BioAg stuff out of OR...has a liquid bottle that has the good ratio of humic and fulvic together..I think I'll see how they are with email questions.
 
Natural

Natural

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@Nightmare creature. You got a link to your article/s??

IME< What can happen is the silica is added to the res and then the ph gets out of range, then nutes are added, causing lockout.
silicon, ph to range, add nutes. Keep within a ph of 4.0 to 8.5


Could add kelp + humic/fulvic + citric acid (for ph adjustment) all with silicon.
foliar: silicon + neem. silica is used to emulsify the oil.
Bactillis is good for breaking down the organic matter than contains silica in the medium.



@Seamaiden Studies show it is important to get silicon into the roots.
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Effect of root and foliar applications of silicon on brown spot development in rice
D. C. Rezende, F. Á. Rodrigues, V. Carré-Missio, D. A. Schurt, I. K. Kawamura and G. H. Korndörfer
Abstract. Silicon (Si) application is a strategy to manage rice brown spot, but no studies have been conducted on Si as a foliar spray for control of this disease. The purpose of this study was to compare root and foliar Si applications on rice brown spot development, and to determine if there is a biochemical defence response. Rice plants (cv. Metica-1) were grown in a Si-deficient soil that received the following treatments: root application of calcium silicate (CS) (1.25 g/kg of soil), foliar application of potassium silicate (PS) (40 g/L), and control (leaves sprayed with distilled water). Thirty-day-old plants were inoculated with a conidial suspension of Bipolaris oryzae. Si concentration in rice tissue was markedly higher for CS compared with the other treatments. The intensity of Si deposition, as determined by X-ray microanalysis, between the adaxial and abaxial leaf blades of rice plants in the control treatment was similar. Si deposition occurred in both the adaxial and abaxial leaf blades of rice plants that received CS while this Si deposition only occurred on the adaxial leaf blades of plants that received PS. The area under brown spot progress curve (AUBSPC) was not significantly different between the PS and control treatments, but was significantly lower in plants grown in soil amended with CS. The values for the AUBSPC and the number of lesions (NL) per cm2 of leaf area decreased by 37 and 47%, respectively, with CS compared with the control. Conidial germination was not inhibited by PS. The concentration of total soluble phenolics and lignin-thioglycolic acid derivatives was not linked with the reduction observed in the AUBSPC and the NL. Although the concentration of these two biochemical variables seemed to be slightly higher in plants from the control treatment, likely due to the greater disease severity and the NL, rice tissue was not efficiently protected against colonisation by B. oryzae. The results of this study suggest that foliar-applied Si can decrease the intensity of brown spot; however, the level of control achieved was not as great as that obtained when Si was supplied to the roots.


Effect of root and foliar applications of soluble silicon on powdery mildew control and growth of wheat plants
M.-H. Guével & J. G. Menzies & R. R. Bélanger
Abstract Foliar and root applications of different silicon (Si)-based formulations were evaluated for their effects in reducing powdery mildew and pro- moting growth of wheat plants. X-ray microanalyses of treated plants revealed that root applications resulted in consistent deposition of Si in the leaves. In terms of powdery mildew control, root applications at 1.7 mM Si gave consistently the best results, reducing disease severity by as much as 80%, regardless of the product used. Although less effective than root applications, foliar treatments with both Si and nutrient salt solutions led to a significant reduction of powdery mildew on wheat plants. This suggests a direct effect of the products on powdery mildew rather than one mediated by the plant as in the case of root amendments. In our experiments, Si amendment, either through the roots or the leaves, did not increase plant growth.These results lead to the conclusion that Si is primarily, if not exclusively, absorbed by the root system and that such absorption by the roots is necessary for an optimal prophylactic effect.



ph range of 4-8.5 is safe zone for silicon = silicic acid

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Articles on silica
Boron's Role in Silica Uptake
Hugh Lovelhttp://www.quantumagriculture.com/node/181
Biochemical%20Sequence%203a%20%282%29.jpg



Silica – The Hidden Cost of Chemicals
http://www.nutri-tech.com.au/blog/2010/06/silica-the-hidden-cost-of-chemicals/


@Natural, Horsetail and Comfrey both contain silicic acid.


Reflecting back on all of those studies of Silicic acid and polymerization..I noticed they were talking alot about high PH being the culprit for vast polymerization and the formation of insoluble silica. So basically, the PH levels are good for hydro and soil if we can keep it in that range...as pertaining to the salicic acid production when KSi falls out in the solution. I'm thinking Aptus..and I may be horribly wrong here..but I'm thinking they start with a source of Silicate..then with some fashion they subject it to an extremely strong acid..then raise the PH until they reach the point of saturated positive ions of silicic acid...then buffer that solution and/or keep it in sterile 0 ppm solution..which would keep it from polymerization. That might be all the fuss about adding to RO only.
 
gliders420

gliders420

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I've read that too! Aspirin is just a form of salicyclic acid..which is a plant signaler..gets the defense system on high alert. The more I read about trans species studies though, the more I think it is not a good option for cannabis.
And I keep reading that too. People say both things.....
 
Seamaiden

Seamaiden

Living dead girl
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Can I ask how you know it's working? I thought it took a long time for the Si to be broken down and available from rice hulls? Ive never been able to tell if my silica has been working or not using aptus in the medium or the silica from botanicare.... Never together
I guess I'd need to know what you mean by "working" to really be able to answer you well. I've never experienced a direct Si-. My plants generally show good turgor and rigidity unless they're water-stressed (no water, never overwatered). I don't have issues with stuff like PM for the most part.
Ya..I get confused between Salicyclic acid and silicic acid all the time. Been reading that aspirin is salicyclic acid and that is a plant protection trigger like jasmonic acid is...only salicyclic acid tends to decrease glandular trichomes and if you add aspirin to soil...according to Ed Rosenthal is a way to reverse a females sex.
I have never once seen a plant hermie from using aspirin but from what I recall reading in the past, you've got to use enough. I don't know how much that is, but I've read some other cat here doing it or discussing using aspirin as another method to cause hermaphroditism. With aspirin, a little dab'll do ya. I use one 325mg tablet/2gals water. I can't say I've noted a difference in glandular trichomes between using it and not because when I use it most is when a plant is more stressed than I can help it out of using just beneficials, the soil food web, etc. Also, I've never measured.
I would never add grains to my coco. Grains mold faster than just about anything. Seems like a great way to cause root rot or a fungus infestation.

I use humic acid in my nute mix without any problems. When I tried using Fulvic acid in my nute mix, it just burned the crap out of my plants. When I use Fulvic as a foliar spray, my plants like it. Fulvic is strong stuff, be careful.
Not grains--the hulls, which are very high in lignin. It's not only easier to use than perlite, it is so much more cost effective it's stupid. That said, oatmeal is fantastic for helping to get beneficial soil fungi like mycorrhizae cultured, and IIRC rice can do the same. I think it's used as a carrier for Met52. If you're getting pathogenic molds/fungi, then you've got another problem, can't just blame it on the grain.

Fulvic acid is but one component of the suite of humic acids, and considering that what they allow for is chelation (better uptake), if you didn't simultaneously drop your feed when you added the fulvic then perhaps the burn you experienced was due to fulvic allowing for that much more uptake. Just a thought. I've only ever used humics, but I always drop my feed by at least 25% when I use them. In fact, it's *why* I use them.
And hopefully this isn't too off topic: what aspirin to use??? Every thing at the store is coated or seems like to much crap and not enough aspirin....
I use cheap-ass 325mg tablets. They dissolve pretty quickly. I add them at the very end of my teas.
Good info Alti!! Just bought some Ful-Humic from a company called BioAg out of OR. Gonna go back and get the Ful-Power. Stuff is cheap and highly concentrated. I only got Humic..due to the rule of Humic for soil..and Fulvic for foliar...thanks again.
I need their Ca 6%! I really like their products, and PVFS wasn't selling the Ca 6% last year when I needed it, so I ended up with Calcium-25. I don't like being married to foliaring such an important nutrient.
 
J

Jalisco Kid

Guest
@Seamaiden
I need their Ca 6%! I really like their products, and PVFS wasn't selling the Ca 6% last year when I needed it, so I ended up with Calcium-25. I don't like being married to foliaring such an important nutrient.
Since Ca is not mobile I find foliaring with it works really well in my room.
I use fulvic way more then most, it really helps with chunky stuff. I find it raises all the measurements when I use leaf analysis.
K silicate helps build your walls,helps with nute transport,keeps boyt out of my bud using it at 8.2 pH.
 
gliders420

gliders420

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"I use cheap-ass 325mg tablets. They dissolve pretty quickly. I add them at the very end of my teas."
@Seamaiden

That's basically all I can find as far as what people use... It doesn't matter that these pills are coated? Or have trace amounts of other crap?

But I've used silica and I've not used it, and I don't know the difference, but it could be due to ph being out of range as others have stated...
 
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Seamaiden

Seamaiden

Living dead girl
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Apple cider, eh? How about hard cider? Crispin is my favorite, Angry Orchard and Woodchuck come in second.
"I use cheap-ass 325mg tablets. They dissolve pretty quickly. I add them at the very end of my teas."
@Seamaiden

That's basically all I can find as far as what people use... It doesn't matter that these pills are coated? Or have trace amounts of other crap?

But I've used silica and I've not used it, and I don't know the difference, but it could be due to ph being out of range as others have stated...
The only additive I've found noted on the aspirin I use is the coating.

As JK said, it increases strength of cell walls. It also makes plants much more resilient to stresses like high heat. Really, you just want to make sure the plants have enough that they'll grow well, etc.
 
SSgrower

SSgrower

2,103
263
Amino acids are the building blocks of Protein, why is this relevant to cannabis? Anyway, foliar sprays should be used after lights off mostly, I didn't see anyone mention that? I use Dyna-Gro ProTecKt as my silica solution. Power Si I have heard about, it's just more expensive. Interesting thread, carry on,Cheers SS
 

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