Slow Release Fertilizers

Hey. I'm thinking of grow some plants with a slow release fertilizer. Use only powders. Growing in coco & perlite indoor , Organic . with some mycorrhiza.
I saw someone grow up like this on the net and I can not find the fertilizer he uses in my country so I'm looking for something similar
for veg- balanced fertilizer 4-4-4 (1-1-1 ratio ). for bloom 2-8-4 .
Can anyone recommend me this type of fertilizer? What else should I know?
 
In general, people avoid slow release fertilizers for weed. The reason is that the slow release nitrogen interferes with out desire to lower nitrogen in blooming. Timed released ferts will keep on delivering nitrogen, and slow/reduce your blooming.

In general, I advise new growers to stick with mainstream approaches until you have the experience to branch out (pun intended). There is a reason that nobody uses time release fertilzers for weed. If you don't understand a solid, science based reason for doing something different, you'll be more successful sticking with tried and true approaches.
 
I don't know if you are still looking since i am new to this also but i know who you are talking about and he does get amazing results. Down to Earth has a vegetable blend that is 444 and there rose and flower blend is 4-8-6 I personally went with bio live that is 5-4-2 It has both fast and slow release nitrogen and since you re amend every 4 weeks using a slow release is fine. by the time the plant will be into flower you switch to higher phosphorus amendments Sea bird guano for the boost
 
I have a buddy that is a dairy farmer. He composts his cow manure. He lets it leach and dry out before using it as straight potting soil. The nutrient to fiber ratio is perfect. You can even plant seeds in it. He grows some of the best product I have ever seen/tasted/smoked. It's like this:

The Perfect Soil- Real results!

Also, you can do 1/3 compost, 1/3 perlite, 1/3 coco. You might have to do teas or top dress to get to the end of flower, but I did this for some of my first grows 20 years ago and it worked well!
 
im running a coco/perlite with dry amendments (dr earth) grow atm..about 2 weeks into flower. As long as the ratios of ferts to coco is in correct proportions everything should work out nicely.
my mistake, well there was a few, but I amended to heavily at first...it was a domino affect of sad plants from there..for a while... everything Is doing well now..I like this style of Medium.. but honestly I’m getting better result treating coco more like hydro...liquid nutes..frequent watering...massive growth
 
I don't know if you are still looking since i am new to this also but i know who you are talking about and he does get amazing results. Down to Earth has a vegetable blend that is 444 and there rose and flower blend is 4-8-6 I personally went with bio live that is 5-4-2 It has both fast and slow release nitrogen and since you re amend every 4 weeks using a slow release is fine. by the time the plant will be into flower you switch to higher phosphorus amendments Sea bird guano for the boost
I also like the Bio Live. (Has a shelf life of ~1 year, so check package date if you're picking up.)

Edit: never mind, I didn't notice OP was in coco (which I know nothing about).
 
I have a buddy that is a dairy farmer. He composts his cow manure. He lets it leach and dry out before using it as straight potting soil. The nutrient to fiber ratio is perfect. You can even plant seeds in it. He grows some of the best product I have ever seen/tasted/smoked. It's like this:

The Perfect Soil- Real results!

Also, you can do 1/3 compost, 1/3 perlite, 1/3 coco. You might have to do teas or top dress to get to the end of flower, but I did this for some of my first grows 20 years ago and it worked well!

There is a grower on another weed site that grows in composted cow manure exclusively and produces massive trees outside.
 
In general, people avoid slow release fertilizers for weed. The reason is that the slow release nitrogen interferes with out desire to lower nitrogen in blooming. Timed released ferts will keep on delivering nitrogen, and slow/reduce your blooming.

In general, I advise new growers to stick with mainstream approaches until you have the experience to branch out (pun intended). There is a reason that nobody uses time release fertilzers for weed. If you don't understand a solid, science based reason for doing something different, you'll be more successful sticking with tried and true approaches.
 

Jimster

Supporter
Supporter
I grow in Promix which is a bit similar to Coco. I like to add a handfull of Osmokote Prilled time release fertilizer into a mix of Promix and composted manure. The Osmokote contains a ton of major and minor nutrients and provides just about everything that you would need. I fertilize with Jack's 20-20-20 about every 12 days after about 5 weeks. They grow BIG indoors with no issues of lockout of Ph swings.
 
I grow in Promix which is a bit similar to Coco. I like to add a handfull of Osmokote Prilled time release fertilizer into a mix of Promix and composted manure. The Osmokote contains a ton of major and minor nutrients and provides just about everything that you would need. I fertilize with Jack's 20-20-20 about every 12 days after about 5 weeks. They grow BIG indoors with no issues of lockout of Ph swings.
What lighting schedule are you doing? Just curious as I read a lot of people do 24hrs a day lighting and I cant get my head wrapped around that.
 
People make far too many sweeping statements in the Cannabis world. For example, people keep saying that slow release is not good because of the nitrogen, but there are slow release ferts with low N (where you could use it as a base line and add extra N at the beginning), and there are slow release ferts that deplete within a few months. I saw a monster plant last year grown with slow release, so proof is in the pudding. This year, I am using a slow release with a 3 month window. This will get me through the veg phase and be mostly depleted around the beginning of flowering, at which time I will switch over to water soluble ferts.

As others have mentioned, I have also seen amazing looking plants grown in pure manure (horse in this case), which is a slow release fert that would have plenty of residual nitrogen.

If you are not well versed in fertilizers in general I second (or third) the idea of going with known methods, but if you are comfortable with the principles you can break many of the rules.
 
As others have mentioned, I have also seen amazing looking plants grown in pure manure (horse in this case), which is a slow release fert that would have plenty of residual nitrogen.

If you are not well versed in fertilizers in general I second (or third) the idea of going with known methods, but if you are comfortable with the principles you can break many of the rules.
I have outside beds that I have built with steer manure compost over a series of years. I have put 150 bags of steer manure down every year for a 25 x 40 foot spread. Last year, the third year of augmentation, all of my crops exhibited signs of too much much N. Everything was elongated and overly vegetative. The weed, the tomatoes, the beans, everything was overly vegetative. The weed was still good, but the internodes were twice as long as prior years. Weed, in particular, benefits from being able to manage the fertilizer profile. This year, I did not augment.

I agree with your thought about the rules. They are guidelines, not mandates. Useful for the newer folks, something to think about for the more experienced. I am very happy with the tilth of my soil, but I am resting it this year.
 
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