Tree removal question and thoughts

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tinytmp

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Hello!

Question for the homeowner hive mind. My husband and I are in the process of overhauling our backyard. We knew this was a big project that we'd have to tackle when we purchased our house 3 years ago. We live in New England, as a point of reference for my description and questions. Our backyard is surrounded by large trees, mostly oak, some of which need to come down. The previous owner had a chain link fence installed. It looked like crap, and part of it was pulled over by this invasive vine that is growing in the woods behind our yard. She also had artificial turf installed and a mulch area for her daughter's playground (which we have since removed). Yes...turf. Like...why? We just got a dumpster dropped off today. My stepfather is coming tomorrow with his tractor to remove the turf, fencing, etc. Our project is officially underway! We want to plant grass and surround the yard with vinyl fence. First task is removing old fence and turf, then tree removal.

In the back of the yard there is a HUGE willow tree. I hate this tree. It drops leaves year round (it seems). It drops huge chunks of branch like things (not limbs, not leaves, but in between- this description is stupid. I'm not a tree expert). Last year, a huge limb fell from it in a storm, luckily in the direction away from the house. It is thriving because it is close to the bank of a stream (I know willows like water). It needs to come down. The issue is that we also have an easement behind our property and to the left. We aren't sure if this tree is on our property, or on the city's property, since the easement is (supposed to be but is not) maintained by the city, and we aren't 100% clear on our property boundaries. The previous fence went right up to where the willow is, but we aren't sure if they used that as a natural boundary or if that is actually our property line.

How can we go about figuring out whose property the tree is on? Surveys are expensive- is this the only way to go? Would the city clerk or some other office have any record of this at all?

If we did find out that it is on city property, is there any way we could convince them to remove it? It's honestly a hazard to our home. Obviously if it's on our property, it's up to us to take care of it. It's massive and would require the use of a crane to take the top off and then remove the rest.

Tree removal is no joke. What do ya'll think?
 
T

tinytmp

23
3
Hello!

Question for the homeowner hive mind. My husband and I are in the process of overhauling our backyard. We knew this was a big project that we'd have to tackle when we purchased our house 3 years ago. We live in New England, as a point of reference for my description and questions. Our backyard is surrounded by large trees, mostly oak, some of which need to come down. The previous owner had a chain link fence installed. It looked like crap, and part of it was pulled over by this invasive vine that is growing in the woods behind our yard. She also had artificial turf installed and a mulch area for her daughter's playground (which we have since removed). Yes...turf. Like...why? We just got a dumpster dropped off today. My stepfather is coming tomorrow with his tractor to remove the turf, fencing, etc. Our project is officially underway! We want to plant grass and surround the yard with vinyl fence. First task is removing old fence and turf, then tree removal.

In the back of the yard there is a HUGE willow tree. I hate this tree. It drops leaves year round (it seems). It drops huge chunks of branch like things (not limbs, not leaves, but in between- this description is stupid. I'm not a tree expert). Last year, a huge limb fell from it in a storm, luckily in the direction away from the house. It is thriving because it is close to the bank of a stream (I know willows like water). It needs to come down. The issue is that we also have an easement behind our property and to the left tree care durham. We aren't sure if this tree is on our property, or on the city's property, since the easement is (supposed to be but is not) maintained by the city, and we aren't 100% clear on our property boundaries. The previous fence went right up to where the willow is, but we aren't sure if they used that as a natural boundary or if that is actually our property line.

How can we go about figuring out whose property the tree is on? Surveys are expensive- is this the only way to go? Would the city clerk or some other office have any record of this at all?

If we did find out that it is on city property, is there any way we could convince them to remove it? It's honestly a hazard to our home. Obviously if it's on our property, it's up to us to take care of it. It's massive and would require the use of a crane to take the top off and then remove the rest.

Tree removal is no joke. What do ya'll think?
thank you for your time and suggestions.
 
Imzzaudae

Imzzaudae

1,931
263
Get a lot map of your street from your city and a cheep metal detector. You should be able to locate the front survey spikes with detector.
Set detector for iron. The iron spikes may be a foot or two down, just find it and put in a stake.
Put a stake in and run a line from the front survey spikes to the back of your lot. Mark lot depth on line, use the detector to locate your survey spikes.
You can then run a line between the rear survey spikes and see witch side of the line the tree is on.
 
MartyMcFly42oh

MartyMcFly42oh

1,852
263
Hello!

Question for the homeowner hive mind. My husband and I are in the process of overhauling our backyard. We knew this was a big project that we'd have to tackle when we purchased our house 3 years ago. We live in New England, as a point of reference for my description and questions. Our backyard is surrounded by large trees, mostly oak, some of which need to come down. The previous owner had a chain link fence installed. It looked like crap, and part of it was pulled over by this invasive vine that is growing in the woods behind our yard. She also had artificial turf installed and a mulch area for her daughter's playground (which we have since removed). Yes...turf. Like...why? We just got a dumpster dropped off today. My stepfather is coming tomorrow with his tractor to remove the turf, fencing, etc. Our project is officially underway! We want to plant grass and surround the yard with vinyl fence. First task is removing old fence and turf, then tree removal.

In the back of the yard there is a HUGE willow tree. I hate this tree. It drops leaves year round (it seems). It drops huge chunks of branch like things (not limbs, not leaves, but in between- this description is stupid. I'm not a tree expert). Last year, a huge limb fell from it in a storm, luckily in the direction away from the house. It is thriving because it is close to the bank of a stream (I know willows like water). It needs to come down. The issue is that we also have an easement behind our property and to the left. We aren't sure if this tree is on our property, or on the city's property, since the easement is (supposed to be but is not) maintained by the city, and we aren't 100% clear on our property boundaries. The previous fence went right up to where the willow is, but we aren't sure if they used that as a natural boundary or if that is actually our property line.

How can we go about figuring out whose property the tree is on? Surveys are expensive- is this the only way to go? Would the city clerk or some other office have any record of this at all?

If we did find out that it is on city property, is there any way we could convince them to remove it? It's honestly a hazard to our home. Obviously if it's on our property, it's up to us to take care of it. It's massive and would require the use of a crane to take the top off and then remove the rest.

Tree removal is no joke. What do ya'll think?
Your tax assessors should have the exact specifications of your property lines. Hire a professional to remove trees, especially if you have no prior experience. There’s no shortage of YouTube videos that show what happens when trees are cut down by armatures.
 
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Phyto

218
63
Unfortunately many of the apps for property lines have a disclaimer about accuracy, and unless you can either find the survey markers, or a aireal photo showing th property line and the tree(s), you're guessing. Might ask the city if they can confirm whose property the tree is on. I had a similar issue with some property I own that borders a national forest, a huge ponderosa pine tree died and I wanted to take it down for firewood, I called the Ranger station and they sent someone out and GPS'd it, unfortunately it was about 10 feet onto their property (I was still able to cut it, but only after it fell on it's own). The tree yielded about 10 cords of wood!!!
 
Asmodeus

Asmodeus

532
243
I'd be happy to help, but I don't travel much farther out of the Cleveland area.. 😉

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Asmodeus

Asmodeus

532
243
Recently tackled a similar overhaul in my own backyard, so I can totally relate. I had a massive camphor tree in my yard that was causing all sorts of headaches, dropping debris everywhere and just generally being a nuisance. So, I completely get your frustration with the willow. For us, figuring out property lines was tricky too.
In Ohio, anything hanging over the property line you're allowed to trim back. Provided, its done in a responsible way and is not detrimental to the tree. I deal with this all the time
 
MartyMcFly42oh

MartyMcFly42oh

1,852
263
In Ohio, anything hanging over the property line you're allowed to trim back. Provided, its done in a responsible way and is not detrimental to the tree. I deal with this all the time
I did ground work for a arborist back in 2019, part time. That was tough work, the guy I worked for was an animal. He reminded me of a Viking who spoke perfect English but didn’t complete sentences without using the word fuck. We were on our way home one day and he started coming unglued about a woman who wasn’t doing the speed limit, all of a sudden he was yelling at the top of his lungs about her being too high to drive, because she was on “goddamn fucking marijauna edibles” 🤣🤣🤣. There I am in the front seat trying not to laugh at him. Dude was insane, but I tell you what if I had to pick someone to back me up in a brawl he’d be the first one to call. He didn’t keep help very long, I ended up only working for him for a couple months. The last job we did together was an overgrown lot that abutted the side of a building, lots of vines and saplings and undergrowth. That was one of the toughest jobs I’ve ever done. Tree work wasn’t so bad but fuck those overgrown lots, shit took a lot out of me.😓.
 
Asmodeus

Asmodeus

532
243
I did ground work for a arborist back in 2019, part time. That was tough work, the guy I worked for was an animal. He reminded me of a Viking who spoke perfect English but didn’t complete sentences without using the word fuck. We were on our way home one day and he started coming unglued about a woman who wasn’t doing the speed limit, all of a sudden he was yelling at the top of his lungs about her being too high to drive, because she was on “goddamn fucking marijauna edibles” 🤣🤣🤣. There I am in the front seat trying not to laugh at him. Dude was insane, but I tell you what if I had to pick someone to back me up in a brawl he’d be the first one to call. He didn’t keep help very long, I ended up only working for him for a couple months. The last job we did together was an overgrown lot that abutted the side of a building, lots of vines and saplings and undergrowth. That was one of the toughest jobs I’ve ever done. Tree work wasn’t so bad but fuck those overgrown lots, shit took a lot out of me.😓.
Lol, tree guys are a whole different species all together, we're just wired different 🙃

But yeah it can be brutal work sometimes, been doing it my entire adult working life. And its catching up to me, got maybe another 15 yrs left in me, gonna sell off the business and retire god willing..
 
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Phyto

218
63
Lol, tree guys are a whole different species all together, we're just wired different 🙃

But yeah it can be brutal work sometimes, been doing it my entire adult working life. And its catching up to me, got maybe another 15 yrs left in me, gonna sell off the business and retire god willing..

I worked for a couple timber companies back in my college days (Louisianna Pacific, Georgia Pacific, Arcata Redwood), did mostly firelining, controls burns (except when they got out of control), and tree planting. Brutal work! But, I got good with a chainsaw, I could drop a tree within a couple feet of where I wanted it to fall. Firelining was the worst, they used people because the terrain was too steep/rocky to get heavy equipment on. Spent most of the day looking at a hill, swinging a hoe, and hoping the guy above you didn't knock loose a boulder!!! Tree planting wasn't much better, 700 seedlings on your back, drop one every 10 feet, miserable terrain, @ 7 cents a tree, never failed you'd bag out at the bottom of the mountain and have to walk a mile uphill to get more trees.
 
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