Understanding amino acids, it's role on oil production, terpenes.

  • Thread starter Frankster
  • Start date
  • Tagged users None
Frankster

Frankster

Seshat; Goddess of Wisdom, Knowledge, and writing.
Supporter
3,427
263
Plant can directly take up the intact amino acids, thus bypass the microbial mineralization of organic nitrogen. As an excellent carbon and nitrogen source, there exists competition for amino acid absorption between plant roots.and soil microorganisms.

Well I've got some plants that are finishing up, and I'm itching to try something new. I always am a fan of the stinky, so this is right up my alley.

Was really hoping to enhance or boost oils and trichome development, and overall oil complexity, character, terps, ect... What to use... Up till now, been using extra bits of sulfur, and humates/fluvates, keeping a healthy, diverse biome in the coco substrate. Also been using some dry stressing techniques & UVA/B lamps. All helpful stuff, up to a point, IMO. But I want more.

So I got to thinking about amino's a bit more. How much they drive oil production. Cannabis has 20 amino acids. Including Vitamin B6, B12, riboflavin, niacin, and thiamine.
There are various amino plant based extracts available on the open market....

The one I got today is coco amino extract. After extraction, the sap gets stored and ages. During this time, it ferments due to the natural sugars present within it. The final result tastes savory and not at all like coconut. More like soy sauce.... stinky....

So I made some mixture 3 tsp makes 470ppm in 1 gallon, and the ph is around 6.5, so I might pH it downward a tad. Any thoughts or suggestions on doing this?
IMG_20210625_030228742.jpg



Here's a bit on Amino Acids in plants.
Extensive efforts have been made to fortify essential amino acids and boost nutrition in plants, but unintended effects on growth and physiology are also observed. Understanding how different amino acid metabolisms are connected with other biological pathways is therefore important. In addition to protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism is also tightly linked to energy and carbohydrate metabolism, the carbon-nitrogen budget, hormone and secondary metabolism, stress responses, and so on.

cellular function:
 
Frankster

Frankster

Seshat; Goddess of Wisdom, Knowledge, and writing.
Supporter
3,427
263
Here's the 2 test subjects... I don't mind playing around with some of the smaller plants and see if it doesn't enhance things, and help it stand out.
I suppose you can never expect to achieve anything if you are afraid to take some risks.

The one is already fox tailed, so maybe even notice some stress response, either better or worse. There getting really close, so it probably won't have a whole lot of impact, but it will be interesting to see if they respond to it, in any meaningful way.
 
j1sonbrother

j1sonbrother

Supporter
184
63
Here's the 2 test subjects... I don't mind playing around with some of the smaller plants and see if it doesn't enhance things, and help it stand out.
I suppose you can never expect to achieve anything if you are afraid to take some risks.

The one is already fox tailed, so maybe even notice some stress response, either better or worse. There getting really close, so it probably won't have a whole lot of impact, but it will be interesting to see if they respond to it, in any meaningful way.
This is a pretty good article. Franster
I recently bought some powdered amino acid. Can you recommend the dosage? from Veg to Bloom.
 
Frankster

Frankster

Seshat; Goddess of Wisdom, Knowledge, and writing.
Supporter
3,427
263
This is a pretty good article. Franster
I recently bought some powdered amino acid. Can you recommend the dosage? from Veg to Bloom.
Depends on the regime, but I would go small, and find the zone. If your doing strictly organics, perhaps you can go a little bigger, but always monitor pH. The key here is knowing what "amino's you have (purity) and how they will react. Amino acids can provide both a nitrogen and carbon source. The addition of amino-acids such as glycine or glutamic acid to batches of soil resulted in a rapid increase in ammonia, usually within two to four days, resulting in elevated pH. Amino acids are organic compounds that contain amino (–NH2) and carboxyl (–COOH) functional groups, along with a side chain (R group) specific to each amino acid. About 500 naturally occurring amino acids are known.

The core structural functional groups' locations as alpha- (α-), beta- (β-), gamma- (γ-) or delta- (δ-) amino acids; other categories relate to polarity, pH level, and side chain group type (aliphatic, acyclic, aromatic, containing hydroxyl or sulfur, etc.).

A glucogenic amino acid is an amino acid that can be converted into glucose through gluconeogenesis.
A ketogenic amino acid is an amino acid that can be degraded directly into acetyl-CoA
(some are glucogenic, some are the ketogenic, and some are both)

Lysine and leucine are the only purely ketogenic amino acids.


(leucine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, arginine, histidine, tryptophan, valine, threonine and lysine) are synthesized only by plants.
The fastest way for plants to absorb amino acids is via their leaves. In fact, the foliar application of amino acids is believed to improve the transportation of nutrients, increase transpiration, and boost photosynthesis. Hence, it's generally recommend feeding your plants with foliar amino acid fertilisers.

Amino acids are classified into three groups:

  • Essential amino acids.
  • Nonessential amino acids.
  • Conditional amino acids.

I've been working on building up amino's alongside my coco/salt regime, but it needs to be done very cautiously. It possibly offers some better options for the plant, especially during the veg/early flowering stages. I would start with around 1/8 tsp per gallon, and track your pH results very closely, when taken via soil many of these are broken down by organisms. Personally, I think simple amino acids are preferable to the bigger ones.

Peptides are short chains of amino acids linked by peptide bonds. Chains of fewer than ten or fifteen amino acids are called oligopeptides, and include dipeptides, tripeptides, and tetrapeptides.

A polypeptide is a longer, continuous, unbranched peptide chain. Hence, peptides fall under the broad chemical classes of biological polymers and oligomers, alongside nucleic acids, oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and others.

A polypeptide that contains more than approximately fifty amino acids is known as a protein.

Amino acids that have been incorporated into peptides are termed residues. A water molecule is released during formation of each amide bond. All peptides except cyclic peptides have an N-terminal (amine group) and C-terminal (carboxyl group) residue at the end of the peptide
amino list.JPG
 
Last edited:
j1sonbrother

j1sonbrother

Supporter
184
63
Depends on the regime, but I would go small, and find the zone. If your doing strictly organics, perhaps you can go a little bigger, but always monitor pH. The key here is knowing what "amino's you have (purity) and how they will react. Amino acids can provide both a nitrogen and carbon source. The addition of amino-acids such as glycine or glutamic acid to batches of soil resulted in a rapid increase in ammonia, usually within two to four days, resulting in elevated pH. Amino acids are organic compounds that contain amino (–NH2) and carboxyl (–COOH) functional groups, along with a side chain (R group) specific to each amino acid. About 500 naturally occurring amino acids are known.

The core structural functional groups' locations as alpha- (α-), beta- (β-), gamma- (γ-) or delta- (δ-) amino acids; other categories relate to polarity, pH level, and side chain group type (aliphatic, acyclic, aromatic, containing hydroxyl or sulfur, etc.).

A glucogenic amino acid is an amino acid that can be converted into glucose through gluconeogenesis.
A ketogenic amino acid is an amino acid that can be degraded directly into acetyl-CoA
(some are glucogenic, some are the ketogenic, and some are both)

Lysine and leucine are the only purely ketogenic amino acids.


(leucine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, arginine, histidine, tryptophan, valine, threonine and lysine) are synthesized only by plants.
The fastest way for plants to absorb amino acids is via their leaves. In fact, the foliar application of amino acids is believed to improve the transportation of nutrients, increase transpiration, and boost photosynthesis. Hence, we generally recommend feeding your plants with foliar amino acid fertilisers.

Amino acids are classified into three groups:
  • Essential amino acids.
  • Nonessential amino acids.
  • Conditional amino acids.

I've been working on building up amino's alongside my salt regime, but it needs to be done very cautiously. It offers some better options for the plant, especially during the flowering stages. I would start with around 1/8 tsp per gallon, and I would track your pH very closely, because some of these can be broken down by organisms. Personally, I think simple amino acids are superior to the longer ones.

Peptides are short chains of amino acids linked by peptide bonds. Chains of fewer than ten or fifteen amino acids are called oligopeptides, and include dipeptides, tripeptides, and tetrapeptides.

A polypeptide is a longer, continuous, unbranched peptide chain. Hence, peptides fall under the broad chemical classes of biological polymers and oligomers, alongside nucleic acids, oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and others.

A polypeptide that contains more than approximately fifty amino acids is known as a protein.

Amino acids that have been incorporated into peptides are termed residues. A water molecule is released during formation of each amide bond. All peptides except cyclic peptides have an N-terminal (amine group) and C-terminal (carboxyl group) residue at the end of the peptide
Appreciate .Man
 
Frankster

Frankster

Seshat; Goddess of Wisdom, Knowledge, and writing.
Supporter
3,427
263
AIiphatic;
In organic chemistry, hydrocarbons (compounds composed solely of carbon and hydrogen) are divided into two classes: aromatic compounds and aliphatic compounds. Aliphatic are non aromatic in nature, aliphatic compounds lack this delocalization.

Aromatic;
Aromatic compounds are those chemical compounds that contain one or more rings with pi electrons delocalized all the way around them, that exhibit aromaticity.

Basic;
There are three amino acids that have basic side chains at neutral pH. These are arginine (Arg), lysine (Lys), and histidine (His). Their side chains contain nitrogen and resemble ammonia, which is a base. Their pKa's are high enough that they tend to bind protons, gaining a positive charge in the process.

Acidic;
Two amino acids have acidic side chains at neutral pH. These are aspartic acid or aspartate (Asp) and glutamic acid or glutamate (Glu). Their side chains have carboxylic acid groups whose pKa's are low enough to lose protons, becoming negatively charged in the process.

Hydroxylic;
Pertaining to, or containing hydroxyl groups. Serine and threonine are the two amino acids with hydroxyl group which makes them more reactive and hydrophilic. A hydroxy or hydroxyl group is a functional group with the chemical formula -OH and composed of one oxygen atom covalently bonded to one hydrogen atom. In organic chemistry, alcohols and carboxylic acids contain one or more hydroxy groups.

Amidic;
The amide group is called a peptide bond when it is part of the main chain of a protein, and an isopeptide bond when it occurs in a side chain, such as in the amino acids asparagine and glutamine. ... Amides include many other important biological compounds, as well as many drugs like paracetamol, penicillin and LSD.

Sulfur containing;
Methionine, cysteine, homocysteine, and taurine are the 4 common sulfur-containing amino acids, but only the first 2 are incorporated into proteins. ... Cysteine, by virtue of its ability to form disulfide bonds, plays a crucial role in protein structure and in protein-folding pathways.
 
Top Bottom