Week 3 of flower and can’t diagnose! Help!

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Crab_dabs

Crab_dabs

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Hey everyone!

I am new to the forum so please forgive me if any of my etiquette is off.

one of my plants is a Fun Fetti S1 coco grow and is coming up on week 3 or so of flower. In the first week of flowering or slightly before I noticed some browning of leaves.
Toward the beginning of the grow I was not calibrating my PH properly which in turn most likely locked me out (I’m guessing)...since discovering the possible issue I have flushed her with appropriately PH’d water, took a break on any type of neuts, added some supplements like bat guano and a bit of boron, tested the run off (which had a ph level of around 6.5), examined each branch and soil for any pests which I saw none, and now I’m coming up on week 3-4 of flower and nothing seems to be improving and seems to be actually getting worse.

the buds seems to be fine on the fun fetti and the skunk growing next to her is perfectly fine and has had similar treatment so I’m a little stuck.

Also, I am also curious if I’m at a point of not return with her.

Any help would be appreciated!
 
growsince79

growsince79

5,283
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How often do you water?
 
ComfortablyNumb

ComfortablyNumb

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You grow in coco? Make your pH 5.5
 
Backyard_Boogie

Backyard_Boogie

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Yes on that one it was probably overwatering. Keep in mind in the beginning they need much less water almost always when there is overwatering issues they usually get started right in the beginning when the plant is just taking off. Of course once the damage is done it becomes a struggle cuz your constantly trying to fix it but the plant is already sick and stunted and once you go past a certain point its almost not even worth it. This happens because in the beginning there is much less roots in the pot to suck up the water that you keep adding. So basically the pot stays wet all the time especially deeper down below the soils surface. Now once you have grown a big beautiful healthy stud plant then the root ball is so big and powerful that it sucks up the water quickly so the water isn't allowed to stagnate at that point. Its the stagnation and lack of oxygen that rots the roots and kills the plant. A good tip is to water in a circle in the beginning when the plants are small. All they need is one ring of water hug the outside of the pot and dont let the stream even touch the center. Just the wicking will moisten the soil enough. As the plant gets bigger and the roots more developed you can water a little bit more and more and start bringing your watering spiral towards the center more. Once they are full size and sucking it up like crazy you can just flood the pot it doesnt matter as much cuz the plant is in full guzzle mode and can suck up water at the same pace you add it to the pot. I do see you are using fabric which is great continue to do that but in the future at the first sign of overwatering you want to back off on the watering. Then lift that fabric pot a bit off the ground rest it on a metal cookie sheet or put a few blocks under there with a gap in the middle. By getting some airflow on the underside of the fabric pot it will help dry out the bottom much faster which is where the rot very often is worse. Good luck!
 
ComfortablyNumb

ComfortablyNumb

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A good tip is to water in a circle in the beginning when the plants are small. All they need is one ring of water hug the outside of the pot and dont let the stream even touch the center.
Absolutely not.

 
GNick55

GNick55

Staff
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Absolutely not.

i don’t disagree with @Backyard_Boogie as i kinda do the same watering, a bit different from his but i don’t give people that advice as you really need to know what your doing. soaking it all than letting it dry out before watering again is the proper technique.
 
Crab_dabs

Crab_dabs

5
3
Yes on that one it was probably overwatering. Keep in mind in the beginning they need much less water almost always when there is overwatering issues they usually get started right in the beginning when the plant is just taking off. Of course once the damage is done it becomes a struggle cuz your constantly trying to fix it but the plant is already sick and stunted and once you go past a certain point its almost not even worth it. This happens because in the beginning there is much less roots in the pot to suck up the water that you keep adding. So basically the pot stays wet all the time especially deeper down below the soils surface. Now once you have grown a big beautiful healthy stud plant then the root ball is so big and powerful that it sucks up the water quickly so the water isn't allowed to stagnate at that point. Its the stagnation and lack of oxygen that rots the roots and kills the plant. A good tip is to water in a circle in the beginning when the plants are small. All they need is one ring of water hug the outside of the pot and dont let the stream even touch the center. Just the wicking will moisten the soil enough. As the plant gets bigger and the roots more developed you can water a little bit more and more and start bringing your watering spiral towards the center more. Once they are full size and sucking it up like crazy you can just flood the pot it doesnt matter as much cuz the plant is in full guzzle mode and can suck up water at the same pace you add it to the pot. I do see you are using fabric which is great continue to do that but in the future at the first sign of overwatering you want to back off on the watering. Then lift that fabric pot a bit off the ground rest it on a metal cookie sheet or put a few blocks under there with a gap in the middle. By getting some airflow on the underside of the fabric pot it will help dry out the bottom much faster which is where the rot very often is worse. Good luck!
Thank you! This helped to much.
 
Crab_dabs

Crab_dabs

5
3
i don’t disagree with @Backyard_Boogie as i kinda do the same watering, a bit different from his but i don’t give people that advice as you really need to know what your doing. soaking it all than letting it dry out before watering again is the proper technique.
Does this plant even have any chance of making it to harvest?
 
Crab_dabs

Crab_dabs

5
3
Yes on that one it was probably overwatering. Keep in mind in the beginning they need much less water almost always when there is overwatering issues they usually get started right in the beginning when the plant is just taking off. Of course once the damage is done it becomes a struggle cuz your constantly trying to fix it but the plant is already sick and stunted and once you go past a certain point its almost not even worth it. This happens because in the beginning there is much less roots in the pot to suck up the water that you keep adding. So basically the pot stays wet all the time especially deeper down below the soils surface. Now once you have grown a big beautiful healthy stud plant then the root ball is so big and powerful that it sucks up the water quickly so the water isn't allowed to stagnate at that point. Its the stagnation and lack of oxygen that rots the roots and kills the plant. A good tip is to water in a circle in the beginning when the plants are small. All they need is one ring of water hug the outside of the pot and dont let the stream even touch the center. Just the wicking will moisten the soil enough. As the plant gets bigger and the roots more developed you can water a little bit more and more and start bringing your watering spiral towards the center more. Once they are full size and sucking it up like crazy you can just flood the pot it doesnt matter as much cuz the plant is in full guzzle mode and can suck up water at the same pace you add it to the pot. I do see you are using fabric which is great continue to do that but in the future at the first sign of overwatering you want to back off on the watering. Then lift that fabric pot a bit off the ground rest it on a metal cookie sheet or put a few blocks under there with a gap in the middle. By getting some airflow on the underside of the fabric pot it will help dry out the bottom much faster which is where the rot very often is worse. Good luck!
Is there anything I can do at this point to get it her to harvest?
 
royfree2grow

royfree2grow

519
63
Thats an advanced mg deficiency imo.
Slurry test your soil to check the ph, if needed you can use mgso as a good source of mg.
Good luck
 
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