Which is better - coco or fytocell?

I was wondering which you think is best - coco coir or fytocell? I have a choice between both and don't know which to choose.
 
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I wouldn't expect to hear folks on the coco coir forum to recommend fytocell over coco.

Isn't that the same material as sure to grow?
 

leadsled

GrowRU
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Have not used fytocell so can not say from experience. fytocell is expensive. personally I would choose coco for the cost factor. But I am also biased towards coco.

Why not add some fytocell to coco and see what happens?

On there website they show peat based mixes with fytocell added.

Look like better performance than without fytocell, much larger root mass.

Looks like it can be amended to any medium to (supposedly) improve it.

I you do try it out please report back on how it works out for you.

Lead
 
Sorry about the double post. I am new here and didn't know each post has to be moderated.

As for cost, I don't think it is that expensive, but in any case, it's not relevant for me as I have already purchased both and have them available to use.

Fytocell most certainly is NOT sure to grow. From what I've heard that is absolutely shite. I know for a fact that fytocell outperforms vermiculite/perlite and at the very least, works as well as coco.

I just was wondering whether anyone believes it works any better than coco?
 
Sorry about the double post. I am new here and didn't know each post has to be moderated.

As for cost, I don't think it is that expensive, but in any case, it's not relevant for me as I have already purchased both and have them available to use.

Fytocell most certainly is NOT sure to grow. From what I've heard that is absolutely shite. I know for a fact that fytocell outperforms vermiculite/perlite and at the very least, works as well as coco.

I just was wondering whether anyone believes it works any better than coco?
never tried it, but looks interesting
 
A urea melamine formaldehyde resin doesn't sound to attracting to me personally, but....


ISHS Acta Horticulturae 697: International Symposium on Soilless Culture and Hydroponics
FYTOCELL, AN INCREASINGLY POPULAR SUBSTRATE
Author: J.C.C. Welleman
Abstract:
Aminoplast-foams have been used for decades as soil improvers all over the world. Over the past five-year introduction period Fytocell, an aminoplast-foam with additional specific physical characteristics, has provided very good results as a “unique and promising” substrate for the soil less culture sector. Fytocell is an organic synthetic hydrophilic foam, which is biodegradable with an open cell structure. It provides optimum capillarity, homogenously throughout the whole substrate, providing an water/air ratio of 60/40, irrespective of height. As a result of these physical characteristics: Fytocell maintains a good water/air ratio, even when frequently watered; Fytocell promotes strong and uniform rooting throughout the whole substrate; even when fully saturated, the air content is still around 30%, and Fytocell is easy to re-wet. Fytocell can be produced in the local horticultural growing areas resulting in major logistical cost savings. Recent research at the University of Wageningen (environmental technology) has proven that Fytocell is compostable with other organic materials such as plant waste. A solution for waste disposal can therefore be resolved locally. The composted product retains nearly all of its physical characteristics and is very suitable as a soil improver. Fytocell has proven itself within numerous horticultural sectors and fully backs up the results collected at international research and trial stations.

My buddy was talking about trying some new foam product in the greenhouse he works at. Next time I see him I will have to ask him if this is the stuff he was talking about. Would be really interested to see some test grows.
 
A urea melamine formaldehyde resin doesn't sound to attracting to me personally, but....


ISHS Acta Horticulturae 697: International Symposium on Soilless Culture and Hydroponics
FYTOCELL, AN INCREASINGLY POPULAR SUBSTRATE
Author: J.C.C. Welleman
Abstract:
Aminoplast-foams have been used for decades as soil improvers all over the world. Over the past five-year introduction period Fytocell, an aminoplast-foam with additional specific physical characteristics, has provided very good results as a “unique and promising” substrate for the soil less culture sector. Fytocell is an organic synthetic hydrophilic foam, which is biodegradable with an open cell structure. It provides optimum capillarity, homogenously throughout the whole substrate, providing an water/air ratio of 60/40, irrespective of height. As a result of these physical characteristics: Fytocell maintains a good water/air ratio, even when frequently watered; Fytocell promotes strong and uniform rooting throughout the whole substrate; even when fully saturated, the air content is still around 30%, and Fytocell is easy to re-wet. Fytocell can be produced in the local horticultural growing areas resulting in major logistical cost savings. Recent research at the University of Wageningen (environmental technology) has proven that Fytocell is compostable with other organic materials such as plant waste. A solution for waste disposal can therefore be resolved locally. The composted product retains nearly all of its physical characteristics and is very suitable as a soil improver. Fytocell has proven itself within numerous horticultural sectors and fully backs up the results collected at international research and trial stations.

My buddy was talking about trying some new foam product in the greenhouse he works at. Next time I see him I will have to ask him if this is the stuff he was talking about. Would be really interested to see some test grows.
Don't let the chemistry mislead you. Just because it has the word formaldehyde in it, it doesn't mean it's toxic like formaldehyde itself, or has any of the properties of formaldehyde itself for that matter.
 

Seamaiden

Living dead girl
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I bet it was the urea that caught his attention, too, but either way it adds up to... what? Aminoplast implies it's protein-based plastic.

It appears, though, that you've asked a question that no one can answer. You are the guinea pig! Make a thread on an test grow, do a side-by-side. :)
 
Thing is, a member on another board who's used both definitely seemed to think it was better than coco, although I'm not sure if he was positive this is the case.

I'll do a test grow (in my 6' x8' greenhouse, which I've spent ages carefully constructing and has just been finished) and post the results. Should I do it in this thread? Or should I make a brand new thread, for the benefit of others? I'm new here so don't really know my way round the site yet.

Cheers,

Talapika.
 
lol I just thought all of its components don't look to healthy. Agreed that this products individual components don't mean that it is an unhealthy product. I would like to know more about the process to make it and more about its biodegrading process before deaming it green. Always a little cautious when stuff like formaldehyde is being used. Even just in context of someone being exposed to it in the making of the product. That being said done some more reading on it and looks like a good product. I wouldn't object to giving it a go, but never hurts to be a bit enquisitive about new 'green' products.
 
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Isn't that the same material as sure to grow?
I have since looked at it and it is definitely not STG.

It looks interesting to me, particularly because it is claimed to be compostable,
which is what I do with my coco.
 
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