Can someone help me out?

If it's the leaf shape you're asking about, I'm thinking it's mostly genetic. I have some Critical XXL autos going now, that are supposedly 100% Indica, and they started out with the oddest looking broad leaves I've ever seen. As they grew and filled out, the newer growth became progresively less weird looking. Your soil looks pretty soggy. Are you letting it dry out decently before watering again?
 
Maybe my eyes are just shot; or I just end up habitually feeding something with higher nitrogen content; but they just look pale and hungry, compared to how my young plants usually look. Again, I'm a noob, so take it with a huge grain of salt.
 
Right on. If those are in soil I’d make sure those buckets have some holes in the bottom for drainage. They look a bit on the light green side. Could be hungry. I was going to suggest that.
 
I just went out and feed them ladies... thanks guys
You want to make sure you let the soil dry. Sometimes we put more emphasis on getting food to the plant, and keep the soil too perpetually wet. My soil goes through a full ph point range from wet to dry. That makes a wider range of nutrient availability. If it's held wet, it will be more in the acidic range (won't get the benefit of the nutrients being added; at least those that are more available at higher ph. Then the salts buildup, because they're not being consumed by the plant. That contributes to acidity, causing them to be even more unavailable, building up more in the soil, etc. The effect will look like they're increasingly hungry, so you feed more.... probably in a hurry because that seems like the pressing need... not letting the soil dry again... It can spiral like that very easily. Different factors all contributing to one problem.).
 
The effect will look like they're increasingly hungry, so you feed more.... probably in a hurry because that seems like the pressing need... not letting the soil dry again... It can spiral like that very easily. Different factors all contributing to one problem.).
Even a full year into my horticultural dabbling, I still fight the urge to keep the soil more saturated. Intellectually, I know that the vast majority advocate for wet-dry cycles - apparently with results to back it up - but I still have a visceral aversion to the idea. I also have the same odd aversion to using container weight to gauge water content. I've gotten to the point where I just let them dry out until some of them start getting droopy - about every 3-4 days right now - before I soak them again.
 
I've gotten to the point where I just let them dry out until some of them start getting droopy - about every 3-4 days right now - before I soak them again.
I don't think it's good to let them reach that amount of dry. If it takes 3.5 days to get there, then I'll try to feed/water 8 hours prior. (I know it changes as the plant grows into the container. But, after some growing in a particular soil, you know how it changes as the plant grows.).

I think it is a good idea to reach that dry-wilt/drop state every now and then to remind oneself of where that is. However, I wouldn't do that in the first two weeks when the plant's a seedling. Nor, to a flowering plant. It's a stress, technically not good to do. But, during veg, I think it's reasonable (occasional) tradeoff. The alternative is not knowing where "to dry" is -- and keeping it too wet all the time. That would be more stress than the occasional too-dry stress.
 
If it takes 3.5 days to get there, then I'll try to feed/water 8 hours prior. (I know it changes as the plant grows into the container. But, after some growing in a particular soil, you know how it changes as the plant grows.).
Yeah, I'd also found my way to that very same conclusion: Figure out when they droop and water 12 hours earlier. Problem is, I've lost what little confidence I may have ever had. For a reasonably bright guy, I'm just not taking to growing as smoothly as it seems everyone else does. I clearly can't trust my own judgement, so there's a part of me that wants to just watch the plants and let them do my thinking for me, at least to what puny degree I'm able to understand what they're telling me. I apparently don't have a green thumb; none of this is becoming even remotely instinctive yet. Not very confident that it ever will.
 
Yeah, I'd also found my way to that very same conclusion: Figure out when they droop and water 12 hours earlier. Problem is, I've lost what little confidence I may have ever had. For a reasonably bright guy, I'm just not taking to growing as smoothly as it seems everyone else does. I clearly can't trust my own judgement, so there's a part of me that wants to just watch the plants and let them do my thinking for me, at least to what puny degree I'm able to understand what they're telling me. I apparently don't have a green thumb; none of this is becoming even remotely instinctive yet. Not very confident that it ever will.
It will come...I kinda noob. For me it’s ...I got the lights, tent, soil right, just watering ....over.....under is hard.i us a meter that is in the soil to roots and go by that..amazon ph, moist to dry and wet...seems to work..and I have auto flowers. That I repotted one to bigger and still have fair harvest...so keep it up, u will get the hang of it before long and 😎☺
 

Jack og

Staff member
Supporter
Plants look ok as for the leaves , as others have pointed out, genetics play a role in how they develop.
As for the “wetness” as everyone has pointed out is due to the plant size vs container, seedlings/clones, start them in the smallest pot available or solo cups, here is why, the roots develop at a snails pace at seed/ clone levels. Putting them in a large container, and watering the whole thing, hold more water then they can take up causing issues like rot, or acidic lockout. They will grow just don’t water it. Let the soil get about 75% from wet weight to dry before u add any water. The drying allows roots to pop, and search out water and nutrients . The yellowing is indicating it’s just drinking and not feeding, the soil has enough food to feed the plant but the fact that it’s young and the soil is wet, the roots won’t be able to take up the available nutes.
Sounds counter intuitive but dryer soils allow the roots to proceeds more nutes then wet. She will bounce back and your other plants doo look healthy. Add a fan to circulate air, not directly at them at this stage but across the planter itself.
Cheers
 
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