Help and Advice for a beginner grower

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GanjaFarmer24

GanjaFarmer24

Okey! Should I move it it now? I planted about one week ago. Yeah I’m trying not no overwater. I’m using a spray bottle maybe every 3 days or when the soil is very dry. I have lights on 18 hours and 6 hours of shade but still with the fan running. Does the older plant look healthy? The plant tilted a little bit, not that much but I took a little soil and straightened the plant very carefully. I have the lamp about 30-40cm from the plant, I also have a reflector. I appreciate all the help and tips.
It's up to you, if you can be gentle with it, i'd say move it now before they get a chance to tangle roots. Give you a chance to start mixing up some new medium. With a 250w light, 40 centimeters height should be fine. Actually, that's probably what's drying your soil out nice and quick. Now that I think of it, how are your temps looking?
 
Maxiboy

Maxiboy

It's up to you, if you can be gentle with it, i'd say move it now before they get a chance to tangle roots. Give you a chance to start mixing up some new medium. With a 250w light, 40 centimeters height should be fine. Actually, that's probably what's drying your soil out nice and quick. Now that I think of it, how are your temps looking?
It's up to you, if you can be gentle with it, i'd say move it now before they get a chance to tangle roots. Give you a chance to start mixing up some new medium. With a 250w light, 40 centimeters height should be fine. Actually, that's probably what's drying your soil out nice and quick. Now that I think of it, how are your temps looking?
the temp is between 18-25C. Yeah I might try to replant it tomorrow. Hopefully it survives
 
Anthem

Anthem

On my first grow as well, but I’d say if your using synthetic nutrients, from the second you feed the plants them, do not bring them outside. For I have had a great first grow so far and the only issue I’ve delt with is bugs. Synthetic nutrients greatly attract them and I had just taken my plants outside two times to clean the tent and have delt w two separate bug issues. I’m not exactly sure which brand soil or fertilizer and what nutrients it’s going to provide then the obvious nitrogen boost from all fertilizer. If you go to a local country store or hydro phonic store or even Amazon you can get fox farms ocean forest and you’re plant can survive on ph maintained water for around 30-40 days for that soil is extremely high and rich w healthy ppm for the plant and as roots grow it can feed at its own way in an organic fashion at first, which is definitely worth the money saved on nutrients. Just a thought for as I myself am still learning lots. Happy growing man and good luck:)!
Staple_1 Can you please provide some scientific data showing how synthetic nutrients attracts bugs?
 
ComfortablyNumb

ComfortablyNumb

When you water, water the entire bucket. Some say to water a circle to force root growth, but that's not how it works.
Water all of it each time. Give it enough to soak it. Then watch it. The leaves will tell you when to water.
When the leaves are pointing up, they are building new plant/flower. When they are running out of water, the leaves will begin to droop.
When the leaves are down to level or lower, water.
 
lvstealth

lvstealth

Supporter
read these threads and you will get some great info.


 
ComfortablyNumb

ComfortablyNumb

Did you happen to read the part that stated Synthetic? Synthetic nutrients are already in raw form (NPK) micro nutrients as well. Sugars are given off when organic compounds are broken down.
I should have said fermentation, not sugar.

"In a number of cases, a synthetically produced amino acid can be biologically transformed into another amino acid by a semi-fermentation or an enzymatic process. The semifermentation process involves the metabolic interaction of a fermentation organism with a synthetic precursor. An increasing number of organisms are genetically engineered. Amino acids may also be formed by reactions catalyzed by enzymes. The substrates may be naturally occurring, but they may also be synthetic, and are often both. They may also be produced by a wide number of non-biological processes that are considered to be synthetic by the TAP (Areki and Ozeki, 1991)."


This is discussing the breakdown of synthetic nutes.
 
Anthem

Anthem

I should have said fermentation, not sugar.

"In a number of cases, a synthetically produced amino acid can be biologically transformed into another amino acid by a semi-fermentation or an enzymatic process. The semifermentation process involves the metabolic interaction of a fermentation organism with a synthetic precursor. An increasing number of organisms are genetically engineered. Amino acids may also be formed by reactions catalyzed by enzymes. The substrates may be naturally occurring, but they may also be synthetic, and are often both. They may also be produced by a wide number of non-biological processes that are considered to be synthetic by the TAP (Areki and Ozeki, 1991)."


This is discussing the breakdown of synthetic nutes.
That is discussing the breakdown of a synthetically produced amino acid if I am not mistaken.
I am not seeing Amino acids in the attached product information.
 
View attachment Athena-Pro-Bloom-25-lb.pdf View attachment Athena-Pro-Core-25-lb.pdf View attachment Athena-Pro-Grow-25-lb.pdf
Anthem

Anthem

I think you will find that the amino acids are present, not necessarily in the soil or nutes.

That is about the breakdown of plant biostructure followed by amino acid determination. I guess we are right back to be right at all cost. Just give it a rest and save yourself now.
 
ComfortablyNumb

ComfortablyNumb

That is about the breakdown of plant biostructure followed by amino acid determination. I guess we are right back to be right at all cost. Just give it a rest and save yourself now.
You do realize this is all related and one affects the other right? Just dismissing something because it doesn't use the words you are looking for doesn't help.
Sugars ARE created in the plant. Which enzyme does it or if it is the result of the amino fermentation doesn't really matter. It's the result.
Not being a Botanist, I lack the details to explain what you are looking for, but it is there regardless.
 
Anthem

Anthem

You do realize this is all related and one affects the other right? Just dismissing something because it doesn't use the words you are looking for doesn't help.
Sugars ARE created in the plant. Which enzyme does it or if it is the result of the amino fermentation doesn't really matter. It's the result.
Not being a Botanist, I lack the details to explain what you are looking for, but it is there regardless.
Ok so @ComfortablyNumb, what we have been discussing is the fact that you are wrong and now you are trying very hard to be right by just throwing up bad information. What started out as me asking for some back up to synthetic nutrients causing bugs to be attracted to plants brought you into my post. Where you stated the enzymes breakdown the nutrients to sugars. But you cannot even acknowledge the fact that we are not dealing with natural organic materials but synthetic nutrients that are already in the raw form of NPK and micro nutrients. Next you throw up Amino Acids and fermentation but we got no amino acids in the nutrients, next it was the breakdown of plant bio structure. Seriously just give it a rest . No one has said a thing about what is occurring inside the plant but how do synthetic nutrients attract bugs. Please answer that without it being just another one of your goggle searches and some bunk paper about plant biology and now you try to insult me with not hearing what I want to hear.
 
ComfortablyNumb

ComfortablyNumb

Since I'm not a Botanist, I was unsure of where the sugar comes from, so I looked it up. There are 3 processes in a plant that create sugar,
1. Photosynthesis
2. Amino acid breakdown
3. Ezymatic action.

Usually, the most sugar is a product of photosynthesis with the other two providing a small amount.
It doesn't matter if you feed organic or synthetic, all food is turned into sugars by photosynthesis and sugar attracts bugs.
 
Anthem

Anthem

Since I'm not a Botanist, I was unsure of where the sugar comes from, so I looked it up. There are 3 processes in a plant that create sugar,
1. Photosynthesis
2. Amino acid breakdown
3. Ezymatic action.

Usually, the most sugar is a product of photosynthesis with the other two providing a small amount.
It doesn't matter if you feed organic or synthetic, all food is turned into sugars by photosynthesis and sugar attracts bugs.
You really like to be right, but now you just keep changing the subject matter. Lets get back on track and talk about what you originally chimed in about. Oh but that would force you to admit you are wrong once again and for a teach that talks out his back side half the time that is hard. How do synthetic nutrients attach bugs?
Because so far nothing you have posted even being to answer the question.
 
ComfortablyNumb

ComfortablyNumb

Ok so @ComfortablyNumb, what we have been discussing is the fact that you are wrong and now you are trying very hard to be right by just throwing up bad information. What started out as me asking for some back up to synthetic nutrients causing bugs to be attracted to plants brought you into my post. Where you stated the enzymes breakdown the nutrients to sugars. But you cannot even acknowledge the fact that we are not dealing with natural organic materials but synthetic nutrients that are already in the raw form of NPK and micro nutrients. Next you throw up Amino Acids and fermentation but we got no amino acids in the nutrients, next it was the breakdown of plant bio structure. Seriously just give it a rest . No one has said a thing about what is occurring inside the plant but how do synthetic nutrients attract bugs. Please answer that without it being just another one of your goggle searches and some bunk paper about plant biology and now you try to insult me with not hearing what I want to hear.
Not at all. And I don't rest until I figure it out.

I can give you lots of primary sources that say Plants make sugar, which is the crux of my original statement.
If you want to be so nitpicky that I'm not allowed to search and discover... *smh*

I don't like Google, but I do search scholastic sites. I daresay, they should know what they are talking about, even if I'm unsure.
You just don't like my method of learning. Too bad. I don't do it for you.
Have a nice day.
 
Anthem

Anthem

All nutes attract bugs. The sugars that the enzymes make in the food is what attracts them.
How did we get from this to this?
You do realize this is all related and one affects the other right? Just dismissing something because it doesn't use the words you are looking for doesn't help.
Sugars ARE created in the plant. Which enzyme does it or if it is the result of the amino fermentation doesn't really matter. It's the result.
Not being a Botanist, I lack the details to explain what you are looking for, but it is there regardless.
Where did we go from outside the plant to inside the plant?
Because if I am not mistaken regardless of the origin of the NPK (organic or synthetic) this is the very bases of plant life. If you want to keep digging the hole I will keep point it out to you.
 
Aqua Man

Aqua Man

Staff member
Supporter
Imo organics will attract bugs this is because there is more than just the elements in thier makeup. Many bugs feed on decaying matter.

Now the plants also produce sugars but they are trapped in the plant. And unhealthy or damaged plant will give off pheromones that attract bugs. This is kinda like nature selection.

Like ants can damage a plant which then attracts aphids that feed on thw sugary sap.

So I don't see inorganic salt based ferts attracting bugs. But if they contain organics say like molasses then yes.
 
Anthem

Anthem

Not at all. And I don't rest until I figure it out.

I can give you lots of primary sources that say Plants make sugar, which is the crux of my original statement.
If you want to be so nitpicky that I'm not allowed to search and discover... *smh*

I don't like Google, but I do search scholastic sites. I daresay, they should know what they are talking about, even if I'm unsure.
You just don't like my method of learning. Too bad. I don't do it for you.
Have a nice day.
You are just pissed off because once again you have been called out as not being truthful. I guess I should start to follow you so that you do not give any additional miss information.
 
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