How much light is to much light

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Romeleo

Romeleo

Since the moon gives off light and weed plants still are able to flower how much light is to much light when growing in green house.got led street light about 75 to 80 ft away but it's covered by my to where it's not getting much light in just a lil to the point that it could resemble the moon light.any thoughts
 
MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

Since the moon gives off light and weed plants still are able to flower how much light is to much light when growing in green house.got led street light about 75 to 80 ft away but it's covered by my to where it's not getting much light in just a lil to the point that it could resemble the moon light.any thoughts


The moon is only a reflective light source. It measures a only 1 lumen or candlepower. The plants cant see it. We have amazingly sensitive eyes.

The light from the led streetlamp is direct. It can cause reveg and stress to any parts of the plants it lands on.

I have seen pics of half flowering plants next to a street lamp. The shaded side flowered but not the lamp side.
 
Romeleo

Romeleo

Cover these lady's up then pronto.also one more question I have my lady's outside now.but the sun doesn't hit them directly until about 11:30 to 12 because of trees.should I start the light schedule by the time they get direct light or when there's light outside Wich is around 7:30 to 8:00 am.otherwise gonna set up light in greenhouse to make sure it's direct light for full 12 hours.
 
Jimster

Jimster

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Cover these lady's up then pronto.also one more question I have my lady's outside now.but the sun doesn't hit them directly until about 11:30 to 12 because of trees.should I start the light schedule by the time they get direct light or when there's light outside Wich is around 7:30 to 8:00 am.otherwise gonna set up light in greenhouse to make sure it's direct light for full 12 hours.
Light is light, and too much of it can cause issues with photoperiod plants. If you go outside on a full moon night, you can see a little after your eyes get used to the darkness, but compared to a streetlight, it is pretty dim... too dim to really affect plants, although some might be more affected than others. As mentioned, our eyes are pretty sensitive to light. I would consider my photoperiod with the times representing the sunrise/sunset for your location. Around here, I'd consider the sunrise/light period starting around 6 am and ending around 8:30pm. Even though it is only considered about 14-15 hrs of daylight, the plants outside don't usually switch to flowering until mid August. It seems to take a decreasing photoperiod to trigger flowering if you don't go the whole way to 12/12 for flowering, otherwise the plants wouldn't stay in veg mode too long...at least around here!
 
Romeleo

Romeleo

Light is light, and too much of it can cause issues with photoperiod plants. If you go outside on a full moon night, you can see a little after your eyes get used to the darkness, but compared to a streetlight, it is pretty dim... too dim to really affect plants, although some might be more affected than others. As mentioned, our eyes are pretty sensitive to light. I would consider my photoperiod with the times representing the sunrise/sunset for your location. Around here, I'd consider the sunrise/light period starting around 6 am and ending around 8:30pm. Even though it is only considered about 14-15 hrs of daylight, the plants outside don't usually switch to flowering until mid August. It seems to take a decreasing photoperiod to trigger flowering if you don't go the whole way to 12/12 for flowering, otherwise the plants wouldn't stay in veg mode too long...at least around here!
Oh ok.well I had my plants indoors this whole time.got big so put them outside.but gradually so they got used to the sun.and had them flowering in 11/12 for two weeks indoor from 5:30am to 6:30pm at so there two days into outdoor light schedule.just checking everyday to spot any little changes.
 
Jimster

Jimster

Supporter
Oh ok.well I had my plants indoors this whole time.got big so put them outside.but gradually so they got used to the sun.and had them flowering in 11/12 for two weeks indoor from 5:30am to 6:30pm at so there two days into outdoor light schedule.just checking everyday to spot any little changes.
I'm a little confused by your statement "
and had them flowering in 11/12 for two weeks indoor from 5:30am to 6:30pm at", but I believe that you were saying that you were trying to match indoors with outdoors photoperiods so it won't be a shock to your plants. This is good. They shouldn't begin to flower yet, as it is still a little early in the season and the longest days are yet to come. If they begin to flower, that is fine, but be careful that they don't try to revert to vegetative growth again, or it will cause the plants to stall as they change from veg to flowering, and maybe back again.
There is a chemical that light destroys in plants. As the length of time the plant spends in darkness increases (days getting shorter), the concentration of this chemical increases. This chemical triggers flowering when it gets to a certain concentration. Light destroys it quickly, so even having brighter lights on for a few minutes can cause problems if it happens often enough. As the days get longer, the amount of this chemical stays low because of longer daylight hours (or when you turn the lights on for a few minutes) and the plant stays in vegetative growth. This is how the photoperiod affects the plants flowering abilities.
It sounds like you are on the right path...good luck with your "project"!
 
Jack og

Jack og

Supporter
Risks of reveg is there if there is consistent light leakage. So covering her up at night maybe the best bet. Pvc frame with black plastic over it , like a box
 
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