Jacked up seedlings

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MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

Not sure where you are, but I learned recently that mine like it near the hotter/more humid end of the spectrum. I have one lonely Blue Gelato that acts like that, she still likes to feign weakness, but I learned she doesn't like the cold at all. If it were in human terms, yellow tells me sulphur problem (yes, sometimes it's as simple as that in fixing humans). I am brand new to this, these guys can tell you better than me. In my head: maybe sulphur isn't being processed, so what does that equate to? A light problem? A water problem? I believe that's what is part of what's broken down in photosynthesis, right?

You sound very interested in plant processes. The first thing is that plants and humans share very little similarities.

We eat food for energy and growth. Plants absorb light as energy “food”. We have a carbon molecule at the center of every cell. Plants have magnesium. All processes are quite different.

Just to post some info here that could be helpful.

Sulfer is used in small amounts by our plant. To quote the grow books and other sources sulfer deficiency in marijuana is rare.

Phosphorous is a macro nutrient. Used the least of the 3 macros (NPK) but still in a good quantity. It helps drive many plant processes. And it is easily locked out by cold wet roots from overwatering. Once photosynthesis is challenged by the bad uptake nitrogen and others wont process resulting in fade first and necrosis after. The lower yellow leaves will likely burn and die in sploches if not corrected. Maybe turn purple before the spots go brown/tan.
 
KLight03

KLight03

You sound very interested in plant processes. The first thing is that plants and humans share very little similarities.

We eat food for energy and growth. Plants absorb light as energy “food”. We have a carbon molecule at the center of every cell. Plants have magnesium. All processes are quite different.

Just to post some info here that could be helpful.

Sulfer is used in small amounts by our plant. To quote the grow books and other sources sulfer deficiency in marijuana is rare.

Phosphorous is a macro nutrient. Used the least of the 3 macros (NPK) but still in a good quantity. It helps drive many plant processes. And it is easily locked out by cold wet roots from overwatering. Once photosynthesis is challenged by the bad uptake nitrogen and others wont process resulting in fade first and necrosis after. The lower yellow leaves will likely burn and die in sploches if not corrected. Maybe turn purple before the spots go brown/tan.
Thank you for your patience while my brain sorts it out.
My brain's correlation: Our body does break down sugars and phosphorus storage becomes a problem for diabetics[/URL], so it's a sugar problem, which is a macro. This is just how I take on new information. My version of learning, if you will. I don't mean to come across as negating you.

However, I really love that the center of their cells are magnesium. That's pretty cool. I also found this, in case anyone was interested.
 
KLight03

KLight03

You sound very interested in plant processes. The first thing is that plants and humans share very little similarities.

We eat food for energy and growth. Plants absorb light as energy “food”. We have a carbon molecule at the center of every cell. Plants have magnesium. All processes are quite different.

Just to post some info here that could be helpful.

Sulfer is used in small amounts by our plant. To quote the grow books and other sources sulfer deficiency in marijuana is rare.

Phosphorous is a macro nutrient. Used the least of the 3 macros (NPK) but still in a good quantity. It helps drive many plant processes. And it is easily locked out by cold wet roots from overwatering. Once photosynthesis is challenged by the bad uptake nitrogen and others wont process resulting in fade first and necrosis after. The lower yellow leaves will likely burn and die in sploches if not corrected. Maybe turn purple before the spots go brown/tan.
I accidentally hit share, so I appreciate your patience. I'm trying to brush off some cells from long ago and the Parkinson's process can be rough sometimes. The plant creates chlorophyll, then sun and photosynthesis happen, right? So is chlorophyll the dormant energy waiting to be activated? Would that not be an action of sugar energy? I get the nitrogen part, because our bodies break down the same way. I'm sorry that I know this knowledge, but it was a part of the job.
 
Kanzeon

Kanzeon

Chlorophyll is the structural part of photosynthesis. It doesn't happen before the photosynthesis, it is a crucial part of photosynthesis. Most plants evolved to turn sunlight into energy with it. Without chlorophyll, almost every plant dies.

Photosynthesis is the process of the plant getting energy. It's the mechanism by which the plant turns water and CO2 into O2 and carbs, which are another way of saying sugar energy.

The plant "inhales" with water by pulling it and the elements that it needs (N, P, K, C, Mg, Mn, Fe, S, etc) through the roots from the soil, and "exhales" through the stomata on the undersides of the leaves. It also "inhales" CO2 and some nutrients from the atmosphere and simultaneously "poops" out the O2 created as a byproduct of photosynthesis through the same stomata because plants are amazing.

This article explains it better. @bunkerking will likely dig this too.

 
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KLight03

KLight03

Chlorophyll is the structural part of photosynthesis. It doesn't happen before the photosynthesis, it is a crucial part of photosynthesis. Most plants evolved to turn sunlight into energy with it. Without chlorophyll, almost every plant dies.

Photosynthesis is the process of the plant getting energy. It's the mechanism by which the plant turns water and CO2 into O2 and carbs, which are another way of saying sugar energy.

The plant "inhales" with water by pulling it and the elements that it needs (N, P, K, C, Mg, Mn, Fe, S, etc) through the roots from the soil, and "exhales" through the stomata on the undersides of the leaves. It also "inhales" CO2 and some nutrients from the atmosphere and simultaneously "poops" out the O2 created as a byproduct of photosynthesis through the same stomata because plants are amazing.

This article explains it better. @bunkerking will likely dig this too.


I'm still reading, but can you please refresh my memory on NADPH? I'm pretty sure it doesn't mean what I think it does.
 
KLight03

KLight03

Chlorophyll is the structural part of photosynthesis. It doesn't happen before the photosynthesis, it is a crucial part of photosynthesis. Most plants evolved to turn sunlight into energy with it. Without chlorophyll, almost every plant dies.

Photosynthesis is the process of the plant getting energy. It's the mechanism by which the plant turns water and CO2 into O2 and carbs, which are another way of saying sugar energy.

The plant "inhales" with water by pulling it and the elements that it needs (N, P, K, C, Mg, Mn, Fe, S, etc) through the roots from the soil, and "exhales" through the stomata on the undersides of the leaves. It also "inhales" CO2 and some nutrients from the atmosphere and simultaneously "poops" out the O2 created as a byproduct of photosynthesis through the same stomata because plants are amazing.

This article explains it better. @bunkerking will likely dig this too.

Makes perfect sense to me. The leaves act as the lungs, cleaning out the debris and sending on it's way what it doesn't need. Seems we all have to be activated by the sun huh? We all have melanin that needs to be activated by the sun. Very interesting to me. I really appreciate that article. It's very fascinating to me.

So, does t make sense to have something under my plants so the roots can uptake from clean water to process minerals appropriately? I know, from a human standpoint, we process minerals through water.
 
MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

I accidentally hit share, so I appreciate your patience. I'm trying to brush off some cells from long ago and the Parkinson's process can be rough sometimes. The plant creates chlorophyll, then sun and photosynthesis happen, right? So is chlorophyll the dormant energy waiting to be activated? Would that not be an action of sugar energy? I get the nitrogen part, because our bodies break down the same way. I'm sorry that I know this knowledge, but it was a part of the job.


No. The plant produces its own sugars. We need to eat to do that. You cant compare humans and plants. The biology is completely different. Its more of a spiritual thing to compare us.

Plus every plant cell can be any kind of plant cell. Like when we take a cutting the hormones change and it becomes a rooted new plant. Doesnt matter if it is a flowering top or a low branch. I rooted a fully flowered cutting. It grew new leaves right out of the bud.

Try cutting a human leg off and root it in a cup of water. ;-)
 
Kanzeon

Kanzeon

Makes perfect sense to me. The leaves act as the lungs, cleaning out the debris and sending on it's way what it doesn't need. Seems we all have to be activated by the sun huh? We all have melanin that needs to be activated by the sun. Very interesting to me. I really appreciate that article. It's very fascinating to me.

So, does t make sense to have something under my plants so the roots can uptake from clean water to process minerals appropriately? I know, from a human standpoint, we process minerals through water.

Sure thing. I'm not quite sure what you mean by your question though. "Something under your plants" in what context?
 
KLight03

KLight03

No. The plant produces its own sugars. We need to eat to do that. You cant compare humans and plants. The biology is completely different. Its more of a spiritual thing to compare us.

Plus every plant cell can be any kind of plant cell. Like when we take a cutting the hormones change and it becomes a rooted new plant. Doesnt matter if it is a flowering top or a low branch. I rooted a fully flowered cutting. It grew new leaves right out of the bud.

Try cutting a human leg off and root it in a cup of water. ;-)
Hahahaha! If you only knew where I went with that leg comment. I have a very dark sense of humor. Besides that, I don't mean we are 100%.

However, someone in a lab has cloned a heart, a leg, a kidney, and an embryo, that I've read about. So, never say never. We have stem cells, which are similar to plant cells in that you put it next to a precoded cell, say, a kidney cell...that kidney cell will tell that stem cell he is now a kidney cell and share it's code to be a kidney cell. I'm not here to make you crazy. I believe we are speaking the same language, even if the dialect is different. ;)

I truly appreciate your knowledge and your patience with me. :)
 
MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

Makes perfect sense to me. The leaves act as the lungs, cleaning out the debris and sending on it's way what it doesn't need. Seems we all have to be activated by the sun huh? We all have melanin that needs to be activated by the sun. Very interesting to me. I really appreciate that article. It's very fascinating to me.

So, does t make sense to have something under my plants so the roots can uptake from clean water to process minerals appropriately? I know, from a human standpoint, we process minerals through water.

No leaves can be storing elements or releasing them to other parts of the plant. They are not like lungs they are more of a water pump.

We get minerals out of food more than water. One way to think of it is NPK and micro nutrients are like vitamins to the plant. Not energy. Where we use food to power our processes the plant uses light.

And we process food through digestion ourselves. Plants require fully soluble nutrients and cannot digest. In organic methods or in nature microbes in the soil break down food for the plant and the plant provides the microbes carbs for them to eat in a symbiotic process.

And yes we have enzymes and microbes in our digestive system to break down food but we have them in our own body.
 
KLight03

KLight03

Sure thing. I'm not quite sure what you mean by your question though. "Something under your plants" in what context?
Thank you for your patience and not leaving me hanging. I've been leaving words out lately. Does it make sense to put like a water dish under the pot to cause the roots to seek water? Force them to look so to speak? Do I make sense? (I'm frustrated at my self today)
 
MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

Hahahaha! If you only knew where I went with that leg comment. I have a very dark sense of humor. Besides that, I don't mean we are 100%.

However, someone in a lab has cloned a heart, a leg, a kidney, and an embryo, that I've read about. So, never say never. We have stem cells, which are similar to plant cells in that you put it next to a precoded cell, say, a kidney cell...that kidney cell will tell that stem cell he is now a kidney cell and share it's code to be a kidney cell. I'm not here to make you crazy. I believe we are speaking the same language, even if the dialect is different. ;)

I truly appreciate your knowledge and your patience with me. :)


You can pretend to find biological similarities all day but all processes are completely different.

And i too was seeing a leg ripped off a human and placed bloody in a big cup. Lol
 
KLight03

KLight03

No leaves can be storing elements or releasing them to other parts of the plant. They are not like lungs they are more of a water pump.

We get minerals out of food more than water. One way to think of it is NPK and micro nutrients are like vitamins to the plant. Not energy. Where we use food to power our processes the plant uses light.

And we process food through digestion ourselves. Plants require fully soluble nutrients and cannot digest. In organic methods or in nature microbes in the soil break down food for the plant and the plant provides the microbes carbs for them to eat in a symbiotic process.

And yes we have enzymes and microbes in our digestive system to break down food but we have them in our own body.
So the soil acts as the catalyst to allow for the proper gas exchange of the nutrients (feeding)?
 
Kanzeon

Kanzeon

Thank you for your patience and not leaving me hanging. I've been leaving words out lately. Does it make sense to put like a water dish under the pot to cause the roots to seek water? Force them to look so to speak? Do I make sense? (I'm frustrated at my self today)

Nope, but it's a good idea to protect your floors from runoff! The roots will absorb moisture from the soil, which is why even watering is important for healthy root growth.
 
KLight03

KLight03

Nope, but it's a good idea to protect your floors from runoff! The roots will absorb moisture from the soil, which is why even watering is important for healthy root growth.
They don't like it too wet or too dry, right? That's how I seem understand it for mine right now, anyway.
 
Kanzeon

Kanzeon

They don't like it too wet or too dry, right? That's how I seem understand it for mine right now, anyway.

Part of the "breathing" cycle is the roots uptaking both water and nutritional elements from the soil, so it's important to let them dry out in between waterings. Too much watering is like taking a giant breath in, taking a tiny one out, and then trying to take another giant one in. The inverse also applies.
 
MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

So the soil acts as the catalyst to allow for the proper gas exchange of the nutrients (feeding)?


Thats where it gets real different. Nutrients are broken down into ions with a positive charge. The plants roots put out a negative charge and the positive ions are attracted to them. The medium has properties that assist this process called CEC. (Cation Exchange Capacity)

 
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