justanother stealth, DIY, 2x 150 HPS bud box, ...bozo style!

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justanotherbozo

justanotherbozo

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here's a few shots as i finish and install the ballasts, ...note the pic from the
back where you can see i positioned the ballasts so the exhaust fan is aimed
directly at the ballasts, hopefully, that will help keep them cool.

anyway, today i hang the light and the duct work and plug this baby in to see
if my air-flow design works as hoped for.

edit: it didn't, i have to enlarge them, lol

...lol, and to see if my wiring is worth a damn.
 
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justanotherbozo

justanotherbozo

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...here's a few more shots as i inch slowly toward completion, lol.

can you see my mother cab? ...lol.
 
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justanotherbozo

justanotherbozo

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and finally, lol, i'm done, well, almost, lol.

anyway, here's a couple of my DIY cooltube, before and after wiring, and
then the ducting with the lights powered up and running smoothly.
 
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justanotherbozo

justanotherbozo

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here's a few shots of the cab with some plants in there (look for my multi-strain micro-SOG thread).

note the residue all over the leaves, the fourth pic is a close-up, that is my organic
treatment for powdery mildew, just a 50% milk solution.

anyway, here is the info for anyone interested.

Milk is a useful fungicide in the garden, and is more effective than standard chemical brands.


Researchers believe the potassium phosphate in milk boosts a plant's immune system to fight the fungi.

Where most organic gardeners use a baking soda, soap and oil solution, milk may be substituted to combat the unwanted fungus.

Preparing a Milk Solution and Spraying Schedule

The correct dilution and spraying schedule for garden plants depends on the situation and takes some trial and error.

A milk fungicide solution can range from 1 part milk to 9 parts water, to a strong, milk-only solution. A 1:1 dilution may work for a week, but a 1:8 solution requires spraying every 3 or 4 days.

Skim milk may work better than whole milk, as the higher fat milk may clog a sprayer; even reconstituted powdered milk works.

Uses for Milk Fungicide

Milk was originally used in the garden to treat powdery mildew on squash plants. It is now also commonly used on flowers such as rudebekia (Black-eyed Susans) and Begonias to cure powdery mildew.

Milk has also been used to cure Botrytis on a Cyclamen houseplant. This was applied full strength every morning (leftover breakfast milk). Rotten leaves were picked away and the plant pulled through with no more Botrytis.

Black spots and rust on roses can be controlled but not cured with milk. Fortunately, milk can prevent the spread of these fungi to other plants and new leaves. This can be very useful when bringing home a plant from the nursery and finding a black spot.


The copyright of the article Milk as a Garden Fungicide for Powdery Mildew, Botrytis, and Black Spots in Organic Gardening is owned by Deborah Turton. Permission to republish Milk as a Garden Fungicide for Powdery Mildew, Botrytis, and Black Spots in print or online must be granted by the author in writing.


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by Arzeena Hamir
Powdery Mildew

Less than 3 years ago, researchers in South America discovered a new alternative to controlling powdery mildew. Wagner Bettiol, a scientist from Brazil, found that weekly sprays of milk controlled powdery mildew in zucchini just as effectively as synthetic fungicides such as fenarimol or benomyl. Not only was milk found to be effective at controlling the disease, it also acted as a foliar fertilizer, boosting the plant's immune system.

Powdery mildew in the cucurbit family is caused by the organism Sphaerotheca Fuliginea. It is a serious disease that occurs worldwide. For decades, organic gardeners had to rely on making a spray from baking soda to control the disease. Now, instead of measuring out the baking soda and combining it with a surfactant (a "sticking" substance) of either oil or soap, gardeners need only head for their refrigerators.

In his experiments with zucchini plants, Bettiol found that a weekly spray of milk at a concentration of at least 10% (1 part milk to 9 parts water) significantly reduced the severity of powdery mildew infection on the plants by 90%. While some gardeners may be tempted to increase the concentration of milk for more control, Bettiol found that once concentrations rose above 30%, an innoccuous fungus began to grow on the plants. How does milk control powdery mildew?

Scientist aren't 100% sure how milk works to control this disease. It seems that milk is a natural germicide. In addition, it contains several naturally occurring salts and amino acids that are taken up by the plant. From previous experiments using sodium bicarbonate, potassium phosphate, and other salts, researchers have found that the disease is sensitive to these salts. It is possible then, that milk boosts the plant's immune system to prevent the disease.

Milk used around the world
The benefits of using milk to control powdery mildew haven't been isolated to Brazil. Melon growers in New Zealand are saving thousands of dollars every year by spraying their crops with milk instead of synthetic fungicides. The melon growers in New Zealand have been so successful that the wine industry is taking notice and beginning experiments using milk to control powdery mildew in grapes.

What kind of milk should be used?
In Bettiol's original experiment, fresh milk was used, straight from the cow. However, this is obviously not feasible to most home gardeners. The research work in New Zealand actually found that using skim milk was just as effective. Not only was it cheaper, but the fact that the milk had no fat content meant that there was less chance of any odours.

Wagner Bettiol's original article was published in the journal Crop Science (Vol. 18, 1999, pp. 489-92).
 
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justanotherbozo

justanotherbozo

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now, all i need to do is make myself a reflector for the light
and redo the intakes and this job will be complete, lol.
 
justanotherbozo

justanotherbozo

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i figured i'd start it tomorrow, i'm 1 week in so i'll have some
before and after's after i take some after's, lol.

anyway, lol, it's a SOG so i plan on taking pics each week, plus,
i plan on starting a different strain each week so there will be
lots of pics once i've had it running for a few weeks.

lol, in my head i'm building a cloning\mother box so i can turn my
dresser cab into a breeding chamber, lol.

of course, knowing me, it might be months before i actually
get it built in the real, lol.

anyway, look for my growlog starting tomorrow afternoon.
 
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paco666

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mr. bozo.....very impressive.....been gathering equipment for a clone/mother box and a veg/bloom box...retired my diy
grow box 15 years ago for outdoor adventures. ...functionally it was perfect... visually it sucked...'nice grow box dude'...no mistaking it for what it was....was gonna end up going the same route, than i stumbled across your t5 cab.....inspirational to say the least....i'm coming at my build from a stealth angle....no one knows nuthin'....
thnx for putting me in check....
 
justanotherbozo

justanotherbozo

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mr. bozo.....very impressive.....been gathering equipment for a clone/mother box and a veg/bloom box...retired my diy
grow box 15 years ago for outdoor adventures. ...functionally it was perfect... visually it sucked...'nice grow box dude'...no mistaking it for what it was....was gonna end up going the same route, than i stumbled across your t5 cab.....inspirational to say the least....i'm coming at my build from a stealth angle....no one knows nuthin'....
thnx for putting me in check....

you're welcome man and thanks for the props.

...and yeah, stealth was my goal, i wanted them to hide
in plain sight.

anyway, i'm glad you liked them and that they helped give
you some useful ideas, if you'd like, i can give you some links
that you might find helpful, they sure helped me, lol.
...if you're interested, let me know.
 
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blueleaf

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wonderful job
cant wait to see the following grow reports !!
great thread !
 
justanotherbozo

justanotherbozo

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...well, finally, i've re-done the intakes and McGyverred my
reflector, lol.

just so you all know, my new intake configuration works like
a charm, although it does let some light leak out, the intake
cover on the outside goes to about 2 inchs from the floor so
you'd have to lay on the floor and shine a light up in order
for light to leak in (less than a standard night-light leaking out).
...on the plus side, my temps dropped by almost 10 degrees
so now, with the lights on, my temps are running in the mid to
high 70's which pleases me greatly, lol.

oh, and i forgot to take a pic of the new reflector installed so
i'll have to come back later and post that up.

anyway, here are some pics of the new intakes and the DIY
reflector (just a piece of ducting, the kind that is like a
wrap around pipe, i also painted the inside with some
white paint that was made to withstand high temps, to
paint grills and such).
 
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jadins_journey

jadins_journey

Supporter
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much respect Mr. Bozo, I like your cabinet. There's been a great deal of thought put into your design, nice work.

jj
 
justanotherbozo

justanotherbozo

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That'll do. Can't wait to see some nugs in there.

lol, check my sig bro, i started my micro-SOG a couple weeks ago.

much respect Mr. Bozo, I like your cabinet. There's been a great deal of thought put into your design, nice work.

jj

thanks, ...and you're right, lol, i built it almost entirely
in my head before i drove the first screw!

have you checked out my mother cab? ...that one was
a lot of fund to build, lol, now all i have to do is build a
cloning box and i'll be entirely stealth!

lol, i need to come out of the closet, lol.
 
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Bubz

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Bozo thank you for this amazing post...helped me alot..Ive been trying to figure out with my brother a way to make a nice box thats airtight and stealth and your attention to detail in this post has really helped us...at one point i was thinking of buying a supercloset (newb idea) got some good feedback to go DIY and im glad i found this post...thanks again man +rep

Regards,

Bubz
 
LazyNorthern

LazyNorthern

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well, finally, i've got my new fruiting chamber close enough to finished that i can
start paying attention to my other responsibilities, lol.

anyway, this thread is to document what i went through to convert this old
'closet' i found in a Salvation Army store, 61'Hx33'Wx18D, into a micro bud
box. ...lol, and it's been a real pain in the posterior!

here's a few pics to get things started.

note the addition of the lock in the last 2 pics.
Custom cabinets are the best! So much easier to maintain temps and humidity in a smaller area, great for dialing in the goodness!
 
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