• 🎅 Early Christmas Sale - 25% Off All Seeds 🎄
    Use Coupon Code At Checkout: XMAS25

Natures Natural Superbooster

2,545
263
you eating it too? ..seems like this would work great for a nice organic outdoor veggie garden or ganj if you're lucky enough to do OD. I wonder if it would be worth it to run this over peat or coco indoors..been trying to come up with a decent method to recycle peat and not risk the buggies.
 

Capulator

likes to smell trees.
Supporter
6,091
313
sweet. I bet I can throw some in a compost tea and get some benefits in hydro... no? Or even just let a stocking of it sit in my res all the time.
 
2,545
263
Have you ever used the Liquid Gold?
I'm kinda curious about eating the clay..pfff..even after reading the dissertation on "foods you can eat"..man..eating that healthy would be a serious full-time job.
 
Heres some more info on pyroclay PyroClay
Silicon as Silicate Salts 59.6%
Aluminum 22.9%
Iron 4.7%
Magnesium 2.5%
Potassium 2.5%
Calcium 2.2%
Sulphur 2.0%
Sodium 1.2%
Titanium 0.5%
Phosphorus 0.1%
Strontium 0.1%
Gadolinium 2 ppm
Holmium 2 ppm
Barium 969 ppm
Fluorine 500 ppm
Copper 327 ppm
Vanadium 156 ppm
Zirconium 144 ppm
Manganese 119 ppm
Zinc 78 ppm
Cerium 68 ppm
Rubidium 42 ppm
Chlorine 40 ppm
Lanthanum 33 ppm
Nickel 30 ppm
Neodymium 21 ppm
Praseodymium 20 ppm
Gallium 17 ppm
Cadmium 17 ppm
Lithium 15 ppm
Molybdenum 13 ppm
Boron 10 ppm
Scandium 10 ppm
Lead 10 ppm
Chromium 9 ppm
Cobalt 8 ppm
Niobium 6 ppm
Arsenic 6 ppm
Samarium 5 ppm
Thorium 4 ppm
Hafnium 3 ppm
Cesium 2 ppm
1 ppm; Tin; iodine; Selenium; Uranium; Dysprosium;
Bromine; Erbium; Beryllium; Thallium;
Trace Amounts: Antimony; Ytterbium; Terbium;
Tungsten; Mercury; Silver; Tellurium; Thulium; Lutetium;
Indium; Rhenium; Bismuth; Germanium; Iridium
Typical Mineral Analysis
 
PyroClay Mineral Supplement
Silicon is the second most abundant element on the
planet. (oxygen is first and aluminum is third.) The Earth's
crust consists mostly of silicone dioxide (plain sand), and
silicates which vary widely in composition. Sheet silicates,
compounds of silicon, oxygen, metals and carbonates
are rarely consistent in elemental make up. The most
common elements found in sheet silicates are aluminum,
iron, titanium, magnesium, calcium, lithium, manganese,
sodium, and potassium. Hundreds of mineral silicates
occur in the Earth's crust. Silicon is readily available for
plant assimilation as silicic acid. Silicic acids can be
extracted from sheet silicates in the form of monosilicic
acid, orthosilicic acid and metasilicic acid. Standard
nutrient formulations often ignore the existence of silicon
as an essential element. Soil is the mineral substrate for
most of the worlds plant life. Soil water contains silicon,
mainly as silicic acid (H4SiO4). Usually in concentrations
ranging from 50 to 400 ppm. Silicon is readily absorbed
so that terrestrial plants contain it in appreciable
concentrations, ranging from a fraction of 1% of the dry
matter to several percent, and in some plants up to 10%
or even higher. In spite of this prominence of silicon as a
mineral constituent of plants, it is not counted among
the elements defined as “essential”. Ample evidence is
present that silicon, when readily available to plants, plays
a large role in their growth, mineral nutrition, mechanical
strength, and resistance to fungal diseases, herbivory,
and adverse chemical conditions of the medium.
Properties of Sheet Silicon Clay
A common source of silicon is clay. Adding a pinch of
clay to a soil or soilless mix and the plants seemed to be
healthier, grow better, and flowers showed better color.
In addition to the primary silicon/metal oxide content of
the clay, most clays contain small amounts of 97
elements: 5 % iron, 3 % calcium, 2 % each magnesium,
sodium, and potassium and the remaining 92 trace
elements are estimated to be only one percent in total.
For purposes of agriculture and horticulture, the best of
this group are the aluminum silicates. Silicates are a
decisive factor in the healthy development of plants. Not
only for the silicic acid content, but also for trace elements,
pH buffering, and enhancement of the microbial
population in the growing medium.
Research has clearly shown that readily available silicon
plays a large role in growth, mineral nutrition, mechanical
strength, resistance to fungal diseases, and adverse
chemical conditions within the root zone. Plants absorb
silicon in the form of silicic acid, H4SiO4. In soil
environments, silicon in this form is available in the same
relative concentrations as K, Ca, and SO4. It is obvious
that silicon and other rare earth elements are of benefit
as a nutrient component for greenhouse and hydroponic
growing systems. The real problem for growers has been
finding a source of them in an economically and useful
form. Potassium silicate is too pH sensitive and
expensive, and pure silicic acid is not feasible as an
additive. Pyrophyllite clay is the natural answer.
Pyrophyllite Clay
Pyrophyllite Composition
Al2Si4O10(OH)2 Aluminosilicate (aluminum silicate
sheet) A comparison of two growing mediums, one sand
with clay colloids, and the other a hydroponic solution,
each with an equal portion of soluble salts showed that
the absorbed ions of the clay resulted in greater plant
growth. Clay surfaces adsorb large amounts of plant
nutrients without any appreciable change in the osmotic
concentration of the growing medium or fluctuation of
pH. Additionally, clays increase the cation exchange
capacity of the substrate. Pyrophyllite is a relatively
scarce clay, with very few deposits being commercially
mined. The most interesting aspect of the pyrophyllite
clay is the bond which holds it together. This clay is held
together by a Van der Waal bond. This is the weakest
bond which can hold elements together. The potential
bonding with the water is stronger than the bond which
holds the clay together. The result is that when the clay
is exposed to water, it literally falls apart and the clay
becomes a slow release source of silicic acid in two forms.
When the PyroClay is dissolved before it reaches the
roots there is sufficient silicic acid present to neutralize
the antagonistic action of the aluminum. There have been
no negative responses as long as the roots do not grow
directly into the PyroClay in its dry form. The reduced
fungal infections, resulting from the use of PyroClay, are
easily explained by the presence of available silicic acid.
Documented Results
PyroClay has been beneficially used on a range of crops
including; tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, lettuce,
chrysanthemums, african violets, basil, rosemary,
bedding plants, poinsettias, aquatic plants, alstromeria,
roses, tree seedlings, rice, golf courses, plus a host of
others. It has been used in nutrient solutions, both drain
to waste and recycling, and incorporated into all types of
grow media. Also as a foliar dust or spray, or as a topical
media dressing.
The range of trials we have supervised with greenhouse
growers is extensive. In no case has a negative response
on yield been experienced. A tomato grower who lost
30% of his crop to botrytis last year, used PyroClay as a
dusting, once a week for the next year. His loses to botrytis
were zero. A cucumber grower, who was using potassium
silicate in his irrigation program, put 50 grams of PyroClay
on top of each transplant block, in several bays of the
range. The treated plants were the earliest to produce,
the highest producers, and resisted powdery mildew in
spite of the fact the rest of the range became heavily
infected. Another grower with phytophthora in his water
supply, introduced PyroClay into his storage reservoir.
Within days, there was no evidence of phytophthora in
the growing system.
 

Capulator

likes to smell trees.
Supporter
6,091
313
just wanted to add a few more tidbits of info :] Use & Application Chart
Propagation A light dusting of PyroClay over the media
after seeding, will provide fungicidal protection. For
optimum results, water in with a NutriBoost (plant enzyme
rooting initiator) amended solution.
Transplants Sprinkle a few grams of PyroClay on top of
the media after transplanting. In drain to waste, or drip
return systems, place the PyroClay, on top of the
transplant block, under the dripper. For all single year
crops, 25 grams of PyroClay will provide slow release of
silicon throughout the growing season. For multi-year
crops such as roses, add additional PyroClay each year.
Recycling including NFT For recycling water culture,
including NFT, there is the consideration of the additional
nutrient elements, which are added when PyroClay is
dissolved in the reservoir. We recommend that PyroClay
be added to maintain silicon levels at 14 ppm. At this
concentration you are also adding: Fe-1 ppm; Al-5.4 ppm;
K-0.5 ppm; Ca-0.5 ppm; Mg-0.6 ppm; S-0.5 ppm; Na-
0.3 ppm in addition to the rare earth elements at levels
in parts per billion, similar to that found in soils. The
addition of 23.5 grams of PyroClay per 1,000 liters (265
US gallons) of solution will provide silicon concentrations
of 14 ppm at 0.5 mmol (mS).
Field Crops Top dress fields with 300 lbs/acre after
harvest in the fall or between harvests on multiple
cropping.
Concentrated Stock Solution For foliar and irrigation
applications every liter of concentrate is sufficient to treat
100 liters of water at 50 ppm of silicic acid. Use 28 grams
for every liter of concentrate. Treat the PyroClay in a
microwave for 2 minutes at the highest setting. Spread
the heat treated clay onto a tray with a very fine screen
bottom, which will fit over the containers you are using.
Leach the water to be treated through the PyroClay until
the water has a concentration of 10,000 ppm.
Harvest & Pruning Stress Cover all pruning and harvest
wounds with PyroClay dry or as a paste. It may also be
applied through a duster or fogger at the end of the day,
at the rate of 10 lbs/acre. Use of masks or respirators is
recommended.
Crown & Stem Rot Mix 50 grams of Rovril with 2000
grams of PyroClay, and add water to make a thick paste.
Apply a thick coat to all visible lesions. Place 15 grams
of PyroClay around the root crown of all plants in the
affected growing area.
Fungal infections Top dress with 400 lbs/acre of
PyroClay as soon as the fungus is noticed.
Fungus or Pathogen Contaminated Water Supplies
Add 20 grams of PyroClay to each 1000 liters of water
storage and ensure maximum aeration. Repeat each time
reservoir is refilled.
Foliar Application for Powdery Mildew
Add 250 grams of PyroClay to every 1,000 liters of water.
Agitate at 3,000 rpm for 20 minutes. Apply through
pressure sprayer or overhead misting.
 

Capulator

likes to smell trees.
Supporter
6,091
313
just wanted to add a few more tidbits of info :] Use & Application Chart
Propagation A light dusting of PyroClay over the media
after seeding, will provide fungicidal protection. For
optimum results, water in with a NutriBoost (plant enzyme
rooting initiator) amended solution.
Transplants Sprinkle a few grams of PyroClay on top of
the media after transplanting. In drain to waste, or drip
return systems, place the PyroClay, on top of the
transplant block, under the dripper. For all single year
crops, 25 grams of PyroClay will provide slow release of
silicon throughout the growing season. For multi-year
crops such as roses, add additional PyroClay each year.
Recycling including NFT For recycling water culture,
including NFT, there is the consideration of the additional
nutrient elements, which are added when PyroClay is
dissolved in the reservoir. We recommend that PyroClay
be added to maintain silicon levels at 14 ppm. At this
concentration you are also adding: Fe-1 ppm; Al-5.4 ppm;
K-0.5 ppm; Ca-0.5 ppm; Mg-0.6 ppm; S-0.5 ppm; Na-
0.3 ppm in addition to the rare earth elements at levels
in parts per billion, similar to that found in soils. The
addition of 23.5 grams of PyroClay per 1,000 liters (265
US gallons) of solution will provide silicon concentrations
of 14 ppm at 0.5 mmol (mS).
Field Crops Top dress fields with 300 lbs/acre after
harvest in the fall or between harvests on multiple
cropping.
Concentrated Stock Solution For foliar and irrigation
applications every liter of concentrate is sufficient to treat
100 liters of water at 50 ppm of silicic acid. Use 28 grams
for every liter of concentrate. Treat the PyroClay in a
microwave for 2 minutes at the highest setting. Spread
the heat treated clay onto a tray with a very fine screen
bottom, which will fit over the containers you are using.
Leach the water to be treated through the PyroClay until
the water has a concentration of 10,000 ppm.
Harvest & Pruning Stress Cover all pruning and harvest
wounds with PyroClay dry or as a paste. It may also be
applied through a duster or fogger at the end of the day,
at the rate of 10 lbs/acre. Use of masks or respirators is
recommended.
Crown & Stem Rot Mix 50 grams of Rovril with 2000
grams of PyroClay, and add water to make a thick paste.
Apply a thick coat to all visible lesions. Place 15 grams
of PyroClay around the root crown of all plants in the
affected growing area.
Fungal infections Top dress with 400 lbs/acre of
PyroClay as soon as the fungus is noticed.
Fungus or Pathogen Contaminated Water Supplies
Add 20 grams of PyroClay to each 1000 liters of water
storage and ensure maximum aeration. Repeat each time
reservoir is refilled.
Foliar Application for Powdery Mildew
Add 250 grams of PyroClay to every 1,000 liters of water.
Agitate at 3,000 rpm for 20 minutes. Apply through
pressure sprayer or overhead misting.

I made a tea with it and it didnt kill my plants... IN fact, they are growing too ffast..
 
Afew more interesting facts >19-59% Increase in Crop Yields

Beginning in 1986 field tests using pyrophyllite clay were performed by Dr. Lou Bayrock, and David Pittock, (Masters in Agronomy). These field tests were performed under the supervision of the University of Oregon Extension Service. Results of these tests showed an increase in crop yields from 19% to 59%. At the same time nutritional values within the plants were also increased significantly.


Amorphous Silica Unlocks Unusable Phosphates from the Soil

With the aid of Dr. E. Epstein of UC Davis, the University of Florida did tests using amorphous silica to combat the leaching of phosphates into Lake Okeechobee. These tests were completed and a final report showing the results was published in 1999. The tests show that when amorphous silica is applied to soils, it has the ability to unlock phosphates making them available for plant use. At the same time, the silica produced an increase in minerals and other nutrients within the plants, resulting in healthier, more disease resistant produce. The side benefit of this conversion of phosphates in favor of the plant was a reduction of phosphate runoff into Lake Okeechobee.


Amorphous Silica Cleans Up the Environment

Another important side effect was discovered through this testing. The application of amorphous silica actually helped to clean up the environment by adsorbing heavy metals, pesticides, and insecticides. (In the US many cities have banned phosphate use within their city limits due to the ecological damage phosphates fertilizers have caused to the land and water supplies through phosphate runoff.)

The results of these tests indicate that pyrophyllite clay - rich in amorphous silica - has great promise in the agricultural industry as a silicon soil amendment and soil detoxifier.


Silica Recognized as the Essential Macro Nutrient

Since the final report by the University of Florida, segments of the scientific community began to place a greater emphasis on the role of silica in farming practices. Since the 1800’s, the theory has been that only 16 elements were required for plant growth. Of these sixteen, three were known as macro nutrients - nitrogen, phosphate and potassium. Australia has recently become the first country in the world to consider silica, not only as a macro nutrient, but as THE essential macro nutrient.

Silica Rich is abundant in not only silica and the 16 recognized elements required for plant growth, but also over 50 other minerals, trace elements and rare earths that contribute to soil development, plant health and nutrient content.


Insect Resistant Plants

Undesirable insects are controlled more readily in mineral rich soils due to the fact that destroyer insects are only drawn to unhealthy plants. Their job is to take out the imperfections in nature so nature can use that matter for new growth. Silica Rich Pyrophyllite Clay increases the strength and health of a plant, making it undesirable to destroyer insects.


Higher Electrical Charge

Pyrophyllite clay contains a higher electrical charge than other clays giving it an unusual advantage in the agricultural industry in reducing both insect and fungal presence. The exceptional charge allows the clay to stick to the underside of a leaf during a dry dusting of the plant, creating an inhospitable environment for both insects and fungus. This electrostatic characteristic of Silica Rich Pyrophyllite Clay is unique in the fertilizer & clay industries.


Fungus Reduction

Funguses are more readily controlled when dusted or watered onto and around plants due to the fungal reducing properties common to silica-based amendments.

An interesting finding on an 'at home' test of the clay's effect on water has been performed recently. Water with a small amount of clay in it, sealed in a glass jar and set in the sun, did not grow algae, even when left outside in the sun for months at a time. The hypothesis for this unusual phenomenon centers around the clay’s natural ability to contain fungal, and possibly bacterial & viral activity.


A Cost-Effective, Safe Alternative to Chemicals

Due to the multiple benefits of pyrophyllite clay in these major areas alone, this clay, by itself, can safely and effectively replace several products currently being used by farmers today.

There is so much more that has, and is being discovered about the benefits of adding Silica Rich Pyrophyllite Clay to the soil, to the water and to the human body. The following descriptions include some long known, and a few very recent, findings about pyrophyllite clay.


The Silicic Acid Connection to Mineral Uptake

The clay’s rich silica content produces an exceptional abundance of mono & orthosilicic acids when the clay is combined with water. Silicic acids are required to make minerals bioavailable.

Silicic acids have been found to improve mineral uptake in plants, thereby increasing nutritional content significantly. Due to the abundance of bioavailable minerals, plants are known to thrive when properly fed the clay, resulting in less disease, stronger stalks, and greater nutritional yields. Silica Rich Pyrophyllite Clay is an excellent means of restoring the mineral presence in soils that have been depleted from over-farming.

Due to the presence of silicic acids in combination with pyrophyllite clay's greater spectrum of minerals, trace elements and rare earths, Silica Rich is more efficient at delivering nutrients to the plant than the slag ores currently being used in some silica based fertilizers. Compared with slag ores, getting similar or better results can be accomplished, in most cases, with as little as 1/4 to 1/2 as much Silica Rich Pyrophyllite Clay than the ore.

Interestingly, once mineral content of the soil is restored to optimum levels, only a maintenance amount of approximately 100 lbs per acre of Silica Rich Fine Grind is required to obtain the same, or possibly even increasing results from year to year.


More on Pyrophyllite Clay Properties/van der Waals bond

Pyrophyllite clay is known to possess a weak van der Waals bond giving it the property of dispersing easily in water. This property is highly desirable for a clay, since it is this property that keeps the clay from clumping. This dispersing property allows for greater surface exposure of the clay in the soil, therefore more toxins are able to be contacted and absorbed.

A clumping clay like bentonite can be less effective than a dispersing clay due to its more limited exposure of its surface area to toxins.

With pyrophyllite clay being easily dissolved in water without clumping, a greater surface area of the clay is made available to the land for detoxifying purposes. With the clay possessing both absorbing (like a sponge) and adsorbing (like a magnet) properties, its detoxifying properties are exceptionally high.


Environmental Benefits and a Gift to Future Generations

From an environmental perspective, Silica Rich Pyrophyllite Clay may well provide us with a means to clean up much of the pollution in the land, the waterways and possibly in the ocean.

Silica Rich offers us hope that we can restore our fragile lands back to full-nutrient, organic status. Instead of leaving our children with the burden of dead soils and nutritionless foods, we can now offer our future generations the necessary foundations for nutritious, mineral rich foods, and therefore healthier bodies.

At a time in our history in which the world's phosphate reserves are nearly depleted, Silica Rich Pyrophyllite Clay is becoming known as the ideal replacement to help clean up the soils from the damage done by phosphate fertilizers, and to restore the soil (and perhaps our bodies) back to their original healthful, organic state.

Given the nature of our society and the condition of our soils, I personally believe that it is right place, right time for the human race to become aware of Silica Rich Pyrophyllite Clay’s healing powers.
 
3,276
263
Is this related to (or exactly) calcium montmorillonite clay? I have personally ingested that stuff. No noticeable results at the time, but I ain't dead.
I heard it's been used as treatment for MRSA with excellent results. Dunno for fact.
I germed seeds in it too; they had nice vigor, but that may have been genetics.
 

Latest Cannabis Seeds

Sundae Cookies
Sold out

Sundae Cookies

Divine Genetics
Sundae Driver x GMO Cookies
12
Feminized
New
$200.00
Sunset Sherbet S1
Sold out

Sunset Sherbet S1

Divine Genetics
Girl Scout Cookies x Pink Panties
12
Feminized
New
$200.00
Strawberry Sorbet
Sold out

Strawberry Sorbet

DNA Genetics
Heirloom Swiss Sativa x Sorbet
6
Feminized
Limited
$85.00
Sorbet Stash
Sold out

Sorbet Stash

DNA Genetics
Headstash x Sorbet
6
Feminized
Limited
$85.00
Top