New Fox Farm Soil Beneficial's

  • Thread starter waayne
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T

Tex

Premium Member
Supporter
Cool bro, I thought so, must be really nice to go grab.. :D It does seem that the Tahoes are very lanky, viney even... You use clothes pins to pin then down to the side of pot, genius, i was just thinking bout what i had to do..!! Nice garden again and thanx for the info.

:rock
 
waayne

waayne

Here's a couple of pics of the 2 larger Bubba clones.my battery died in the middle of taking these pics so the first pic is of the VooDoo Juice & GreatWhite tester taken right before light's off..the second is the Fox Farm Bene's tester taken the next morning right before the light's came on...
i can't really see any difference at this time.
:passingjoint:
IMG_09441.JPG


IMG_09461.JPG
 
D

dican01

those ladies are looking good waayne. how far along into flower are they?
and what you got going on behind? more bubba?
 
Seamaiden

Seamaiden

Living dead girl
Thank's G.O.D.!!!
I am using GO's CalMag+
I'll run the bene's until about 3 week's into flower then end them.
I find that when I use ample soil Bene's I don't need to feed as much or as often.
I think the Bene's make the root system much more efficient so absorption and availabilty of nutrient's are more readily available and complete.
There's a bit more to it than that, but that's a good summary.

I wish I had seen this thread before, I would have asked you to try out Dr. Earth organic mixes. They're the myco source I've been using for years, just had to switch to Gardener & Bloom, but their list by propagules is similar to Dr. Earth's.

Also, as long as you don't use enough chemical salt levels to kill the bene's, and as long as you give them a little something to eat to continue propagation (molasses or other simple sugars are good) you should not have to continually re-inoculate your medium. Your goal is to culture the microbes more than anything else, then let them do the work of feeding the plants for you. And, it looks like they are!

A tip--add some humic acids to your mix for even better nutrient chelation/uptake. ;)
 
waayne

waayne

There's a bit more to it than that, but that's a good summary.

I wish I had seen this thread before, I would have asked you to try out Dr. Earth organic mixes. They're the myco source I've been using for years, just had to switch to Gardener & Bloom, but their list by propagules is similar to Dr. Earth's.

Also, as long as you don't use enough chemical salt levels to kill the bene's, and as long as you give them a little something to eat to continue propagation (molasses or other simple sugars are good) you should not have to continually re-inoculate your medium. Your goal is to culture the microbes more than anything else, then let them do the work of feeding the plants for you. And, it looks like they are!

A tip--add some humic acids to your mix for even better nutrient chelation/uptake. ;)

Seamaiden thank's for stoppin in and adding a little clarity to what is sometimes a hazy thread!:rock
Yeah I totally agree on just getting the bene's started and then just feeding them.I find that adding them after every transplant get's them established a little faster>>>and I transplant usually 5-6 times thru the life cycle of a production plant.I don't have availability of Dr.Earth's
product's so if you want to throw up a link so I can check it out that would be cool!;)
You're right on about nourishing the soil
bene's, any Chemical nutrient's just destroy the bene's! Gotta keep it 100% Organic to get the full benefit's......:rasta2:
 
Seamaiden

Seamaiden

Living dead girl
I've just finished reading an article in a sample of Acres, U.S.A. magazine on humic acids, and in this one short article I've not only learned a good bit more about humic acids to add to the background, but about (someone's gonna love this) amino acids and how they're formed by, get this, mycorrhizal associations (Glomus). I am definitely subscribing to this magazine, and will be purchasing some books from their library, first focusing on WEEDS. Because if you saw our property you would know why. :thinking
 
BansheeRider

BansheeRider

for those of you who use bennies, do you use some sort of activator for the bacteria?
a local co here sells one with milk-proteins, carbs and molasses.

How important is it to use an activator when using beneficial bacteria?

Happy growing
BR
 
Seamaiden

Seamaiden

Living dead girl
Um... I use water? An activator? I use molasses/malted barley extract (thinned) to feed the starter culture. Is that what you mean? I'm not familiar with using proteins to get the microbes going, only complex carbohydrate chains, OR! what they really seem to like is small bits of wood and other "chewy" things like, say, canvas painter's cloth.
 
B

Buddy Hemphill

Guest
anybody used the Earth Juice Rooters Myco?

I am trying it as we speak.

$12.50 for a bottle of it....

I am soooooo trying to get away for paying for a label...
 
B

BigCountry

for those of you who use bennies, do you use some sort of activator for the bacteria?
a local co here sells one with milk-proteins, carbs and molasses.

How important is it to use an activator when using beneficial bacteria?

Happy growing
BR

Interesting. This brings up the idea of food for bennies in cultures and in soil. Consider yogurt, a bacterial culture that feeds off of proteins, same with cheese.
Now consider the idea of adding carbs to compost teas to produce large colonies of Bacteria.
Both of these are food sources, sources of Carbon, Oxygen. In fact this is what keeps bacterial cultures alive in non-aerated environments.
Good topic for more info...
 
C

CT Guy

Yes, bottled nutes and beneficials are convenient, but if you made a good aerated comopst tea you'd have millions of bacteria and other beneficial microbes as well as active fungi and active protozoa (can't get that in bottles) with thousands of different species, and it would already be a functioning consortium for nutrient cycling (like in nature).

If you need myco, look into the endo product by mycorrhizal applications or the one by bioag.com. Save you tons of money and it's a better product. (these hydro-oriented companies overprice their products because they know they're selling to mj growers).

As for "bio-activators," pick up some unsulfured molasses (I can get it at a feed store, QFC, or whole foods locally). Organic alfalfa meal will work as well or baby oatmeal from the grocery store (promotes bacterial feeding nematodes). Kelp or seaweed is another excellent product for increasing biological activity. Otherwise, you're just paying extra for a brand name.

Just my 2 cents though. If you have the money and like the products and your plants are happy, then I guess just stick with what you're doing.

Cheers,
CT
 
P

purplover83

hey waayne how much dolomite lime do you add per bag of roots organic soil mix?
 
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