Organic Cloning? --Just Realized I've Been Using Poison!

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OpTikFiber

OpTikFiber

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Is there a preferred organic cloning compound?

I've been using RooTing Hormone from Green Light for years. It works. I cut, get wet, dip in power and then put directly in dirt. I know radical stuff, cloning in organic dirt, lol :) But it works.

So I was wondering "whats in this stuff..." The label blew my mind and had to share with you guys!

Organic cloning   just realized ive been using poison


Organic cloning   just realized ive been using poison 2


Organic cloning   just realized ive been using poison 3


Organic cloning   just realized ive been using poison 4


Here are the ingredients from the first graphic. When it didn't list 99.9% of the product directly, I had a funny feeling about this RooTing.

Active Ingredient
Indole-3-butyric acid 0.1%​
Inert Ingredient 99.9%


The side effects that are suggested under the FIRST AID page are pretty scary. Not that I have ever had any problems, I am positive I've inhaled some and get it all over my fingers all the time. Regardless this is an eye opener for my personal safety. Phrases like "take off contaminated clothing" are not what I expected to read on the label.

Do you see the last graphic I posted says it's in violation of federal law to sell plants made with this. It goes on to say it's purpose is for ornamental uses only and specifically says not food.

Alright Big Dogs, how should I be cloning to cut out the last chemicals in my garden?
 
S

slunk

10
0
I have yet to try, but I've read a little bit of honey, a tiny bit of water and some soluble seaweed is a great organic rooting compound. I just made a bubble cloner, but I'll give the honey solution a test next round.
 
dextr0

dextr0

1,611
113
Off top of head only thing that strait pops up is Willow shoots.


Willow
My notes on Willow (yes, the tree).

The main ingredients that affect plant growth are Salicylic acid (a "plant growth regulator") and Rhizocaline (aka "Willow Rooting Substance" a non-auxin, it is still being studied but it works in unison with auxins to aid root development)

• Salicylic acid is a plant growth regulator that increases plant bioproductivity. Experiments carried out with ornamental or horticultural plants in greenhouse conditions or in the open have clearly demonstrated that they respond to this compound. Moreover, lower quantities of SA are needed to establish positive responses in the plants. The effect on ornamental plants is expressed as the increase in plant size, the number of flowers, leaf area and the early appearance of flowers. In horticultural species, the effect reported is the increase of yield without affecting the quality of the fruits. It is proposed that the increase in bioproductivity is mainly due to the positive effect of SA on root length and its density.
• Salicylic acid (SA) is a phytohormone; and a phenol, ubiquitous in plants generating a significant impact on plant growth and development, photosynthesis, transpiration, ion uptake and transport and also induces specific changes in leaf anatomy and chloroplast structure. SA is recognized as an endogenous signal, mediating in plant defense, against pathogens. It plays a role in the resistance of pathogens by inducing the production of 'pathogenesis-related proteins'. It is involved in the systemic acquired resistance [SAR] in which a pathogenic attack on older leaves causes the development of resistance in younger leaves, though whether SA is the transmitted signal is debatable. SA is the calorigenic substance that causes thermogenesis in Arum flowers.
• The theory is that auxin alone is insufficient to cause rooting; there must be an additional substance, tentatively called "rhizocaline," which acts with auxin to stimulate root formation. Plants with an abundance of both substances are easy to root with no external hormone applications. Plants which root easily with a commercial auxin preparation must have adequate natural rhizocaline, but they lack adequate auxin. Still other plants, which are difficult to root even with an auxin preparation, must lack natural rhizocaline. It is these plants which would benefit most from a willow water treatment.

http://www.bluestem.ca/willow-article1.htm :

"Make your own willow water:
Easily root azaleas, lilacs, summersweets (Clethra spp.) and roses by gathering about two cups of pencil-thin willow branches cut to 1-3 inch lengths. Steep twigs in a half-gallon of boiling water overnight. Refrigerated liquid kept in a jar with a tight-fitting lid will remain effective up to two months. (Label jar so you won’t confuse it with your homemade moonshine.) Overnight, soak cuttings you wish to root. Or water soil into which you have planted your cuttings with the willow water. Two applications should be sufficient. Some cuttings root directly in a jar of willow water. Make a fresh batch for each use. You can also use lukewarm water and let twigs soak for 24-48 hours."

As always, use chlorine-free water (RO, etc.). And consider macerating the stems before use. Like hitting them with a hammer.

I would also add willow to a FPE or AACT used for transplanting due to the rooting effects of the rhizocaline (which is water soluble ).

http://www.super-grow.biz/IndoleButi...sp#rhizocaline

How to Make Your Own Rooting Hormone
By Marilyn Pokorney

To make rooting hormone soak the yellow-tipped shoots of a weeping willow tree in water. A tea made from the bark of a willow tree is also effective. When using the shoots or bark soak them for 24 hours prior to using.

Some people have found that using honey makes an effective rooting hormone as well.
 
dextr0

dextr0

1,611
113
I have yet to try, but I've read a little bit of honey, a tiny bit of water and some soluble seaweed is a great organic rooting compound. I just made a bubble cloner, but I'll give the honey solution a test next round.

I forgot about honey too, it has Triacontanol.
 
C

CT Guy

252
18

Olivia's is the only cloning gel I'm aware of that doesn't have that chemical. I called and talked to the chemist for Dip N Grow and he thought that the miniscule amount of chemical in there wouldn't be an issue for a plant that you're smoking or consuming (it's a fraction of a %).

However, like the OP mentioned, it's not approved for use on edibles, which is enough for me to never use it.

You can get the same rooting hormones naturally from willow or seaweed. If interested, I would consider soaking willow and adding seaweed extract to your medium for cheap and comparable results!
 
S

saner1r

94
0
I made a DIY air/sprayer cloner it holds 60 units and is sweet.

Cloning process
Maxicrop liquid seaweed
B1
H20


Oh remember check your ph after adding fertilizer!

1) Take your cuttings!
3) Soak in a cup of water & superthrive
2) Begin filling cloner with new units
3) Complete filling cloner
4) Plug in pump, fogger!
5) Mist cuttings

It takes a little longer then a store bought solution!
8-14 days for healthy cutting establishes healthy root system!

6) Remove cuttings and add to medium!
 
sky high

sky high

4,796
313
Olivia's is the only cloning gel I'm aware of that doesn't have that chemical

Earth juice "Rootstock" is also absent IBA.

Never had any luck getting cuts to root in it, but it >is< organic. :)


Wiki says this about IBA:

Indole-3-butyric acid (1H-Indole-3-butanoic acid, IBA) is a white to light-yellow crystalline solid, with the molecular formula C12H13NO2. It melts at 125 °C in atmospheric pressure and decomposes before boiling.

Plant hormone IBA is a plant hormone in the auxin family and is an ingredient in many commercial plant rooting horticultural products.

For use as such, it should be dissolved in about 75% (or purer) alcohol (as IBA does not dissolve in water), until a concentration from between 10,000 ppm to 50,000 ppm is achieved - this solution should then be diluted to the required concentration using distilled water. IBA is also available as a salt, which is soluble in water. The solution should be kept in a cool, dark place for best results.

This compound had been thought to be strictly synthetic; however, it was reported that the compound was isolated from leaves and seeds of maize and other species. This chemical may also be extracted from any of the salix (willow) genus.

s h
 
Bud Spleefman

Bud Spleefman

Premium Member
Supporter
587
63
Don't all organic nutrients get broken down into chemical elements, some of which are poison, to be absorbed by the plant? Plenty of "organic" poison out there! There is no such thing as an organic ION, by the way... they are all chemicals.
 
MARTA

MARTA

235
28
Indole-3 Butyric Acid can be Synthetic or Organic...

"This compound had been thought to be strictly synthetic; however, it was reported that the compound was isolated from leaves and seeds of maize and other species. This chemical may also be extracted from any of the salix (willow) genus."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indole-3-butyric_acid

I guess you would have to find out from each manufacturer how they source the compound.
 
B

burnalot420

Lolipop Genetics
Supporter
844
18
the most organic natural rooting hormone your gonna get in BARK OF THE WILLOW TREE...take some of the bark from a willow tree..put it in water, let it sit..ala willow tree water..this can be used to presoak the medium and/or foilar feed with it..

i personally use roottech..but yea if its not organic,chances are your gonna wanna keep it away from eyes,mouth etc.
 
MARTA

MARTA

235
28
the most organic natural rooting hormone your gonna get in BARK OF THE WILLOW TREE...take some of the bark from a willow tree..put it in water, let it sit..ala willow tree water..this can be used to presoak the medium and/or foilar feed with it..

i personally use roottech..but yea if its not organic,chances are your gonna wanna keep it away from eyes,mouth etc.

Rootech contains Indole-3-butyric acid.

Which is an Organic Compound.

12 Carbon atoms and 13 Hydrogen atoms that are sidechained with Oxygen



Bark of The willow tree contains Indole-3-butyric acid as well.
 
KAL EL

KAL EL

362
28
I put my cuts in water soaked starter plugs, nothing else added.
Works just fine.
 
T

Tim rogers

1
3
There is a new product out by Earth Juice called Rootstock* which just so happens to be an Organic Rooting Gel and it works just as good if not better than Sythtic Horomones. But that one dude is right about honey and seaweed and willow water is the shit, but make sure everything is sterile uncluding the trays bacteria will ruin all ur cuts
 
organicozarks

organicozarks

337
93
I have done multiple sided by side experiments with willow bark, honey, alfalfa, kelp meal, rootstock, aloe vera juice, humic acid, and nothing. Out of all of these things, and any combination there of Nothing always won. My goal was to make a better Organic rooting agent, and I was very surprised to find out that there is no need to use one at all. I could not on any test beat the Nothing plants. I have some cuttings in right now that are on day 5 with roots, and I used absolutely nothing. I have found that temps (about 80) and humidity (high as hell:)) play the biggest role in getting cuttings to root quickly.

I will say that humic acid in water with aloe vera juice did give me more roots than I would have normally gotten. They came a little slower than usual, but when they did sprout out there were tons of them very fast. I just soaked my rapid rooters in aloe water with humic acid. That being said still compared to nothing the nothing wins out. This does not even factor in price. If that is the case then nothing would be a no brainer.
 
Ohiofarmer

Ohiofarmer

932
93
Indole-3-butyric acid is classified as a biochemical toxic pesticide......Research has been done on it and it does and will cause significant reproductive harm, the list of side effects on humans could take up this whole page.... It is classified as a carcinogenic synthetic compound....I can't bash anyone who uses it cause in my younger years starting out i too used it. It is important to note that, Indole-3-butyric acid, IS Not a rooting hormone, infact it's not even a hormone plants use at all, however it has similiar structure to Indole-3-Acetic acid which is a plant growth regulator,which also is deemed carinogenic by the FDA and EPA. It promotes rooting by burning away the outter layers of waxes on plant stalks/stems inorder to unveil the inner working of the plant which is where the roots develop from....i could go more in depth but if you wanna know just do some diggin. Where as Indole-3-Acetic acid actaully produces a rooting response in the plant. The best rooting method i have found is a soak in water with lemon juice then plant like normal, the lemon or citrus juice serves to dissolve the 1st 3 layers of outter waxes so that the proccess is sped up a bit(it's not needed tho)......quite funny when people find out they need nothing to clone with except some scissors and a cup of water........Take it easy
 
Seamaiden

Seamaiden

Living dead girl
23,597
638
Ha! I've been doing an experiment to help me with this. I've got four sets of clones--Cap's bennies, Roots Oregonism, Down to Earth (these are all bennies), rooting hormone (I have Greenlight on hand), and a control group using nothing. So far the DTE clones have died off. Cap's clones are growing best, then the RO and control clones look the same. Media was Gardener & Bloome Eden Valley Blend potting soil.
http://www.kellogggarden.com/products?brand=gardnerbloome&category=gardnerbloome-soils#13

I've also taken cuttings that I didn't have a place for and just stuck 'em in a cup of water and after a few weeks they had roots, though I don't recommend this. I really prefer the aerocloner for doing cuttings. I either use a very mild nutrient solution using kelp, or nothing.
 
baba G

baba G

bean sprouts are tasty
5,290
313
Replicator is hormone free. Those hormones actually inhibit root growth for the first bit until it allows root growth.
 

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