What is ideal pot for supersoil to grow?fabric or plastic?

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Simba1

Simba1

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I have heard the fabric pots are getting dry faster and the idea of supersoil is to keep the soil wet all the time, so which pot is better ?Fabric or Plastic?
 
Simba1

Simba1

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I grow in plastic pots with big drainage holes. I've tried the fabric pots and didn't like them as much.
I wraped the plastic around the fobrics pots and on top aswell is it okey for this grow.
 
BirdLaw86

BirdLaw86

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Fab pots are working like a charm for me. Its so hard to overwater them bc its a 7gal pot and the air flow in the tent is optimal so by the next day the outer layer is kinda dry and I assume itll wick the excess water away from the middle of pot where airflow is far less than the sides. Tbh im in living super soil and i wouldnt change a thing as far as the pots or medium goes. My small issue is the actual nutrient feeding schedule as Im unsure of what the plant may need at certain stages when it shows signs of discolor etc. But as far as pots go, i think fab is the way to go.
 
BirdLaw86

BirdLaw86

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Fabric has advantage for air circulation but they are much more work to keep runoff cleaned up when growing indoors. One point about living soil is you want minimal runoff.
I use a air pressured sprayer and use it on lowest stream setting, it takes about 15 mins to water in a gallon of water and I keep checking bottom of pot for moisture as i water, I keep watering until i feel slight dripping at bottom of pot and then stop. Fully saturated and minimal runoff. No mess at all what so ever in the tent aside from the mess I make and leave due to laziness. None of which is caused by runoff.
 
freezeland2

freezeland2

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I use a air pressured sprayer and use it on lowest stream setting, it takes about 15 mins to water in a gallon of water and I keep checking bottom of pot for moisture as i water, I keep watering until i feel slight dripping at bottom of pot and then stop. Fully saturated and minimal runoff. No mess at all what so ever in the tent.
I use an auto drip system that turns on and off at a set soil moisture level.
 
Simba1

Simba1

148
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Fabric has advantage for air circulation but they are much more work to keep runoff cleaned up when growing indoors. One point about living soil is you want minimal d

I use a air pressured sprayer and use it on lowest stream setting, it takes about 15 mins to water in a gallon of water and I keep checking bottom of pot for moisture as i water, I keep watering until i feel slight dripping at bottom of pot and then stop. Fully saturated and minimal runoff. No mess at all what so ever in the tent aside from the mess I make and leave due to laziness. None of which is caused by runoff.
Do we need to have runoff for super soil?I have heard you dont need run off.
 
lvstealth

lvstealth

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fabric for me.

cheap, easy, stores better than plastic, lighter for an old broad to move and i can jab the bottom on the side with a meter probe (read the thread on it!) and hit my water table every time!

the other thing is, i put everything in fabric pots, all my violets, my jades my aloes and all the rest... and wow! they are doing better than ever. so im sold on fabric!

storage is huge for me. i have 10 sizes and at least 10 of each and it fits in a box in my bathroom. the plastic pots are all under the porch now and there are fewer and take 5 times the room to store!
 
CannaGranny

CannaGranny

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I’m all in on the fabric pots. I have found the most important thing is how you water them. Trying to rush or put water through at a fast pace only allows the water to channel through or drain through, seeping from the sides and along the outer edge of the bottom.
I have also found unlike the plastic pot when the main root reaches resistance, the roots never snake or curl along the bottom. This allows the root to grow through the bag and sheer itself off, like they do in nature. Keeping it’s energy on your flowers instead of fighting to protect a root.
Another important factor is to have airflow beneath the bag. I manage this by buying blank wreath rounds. They can be found at the dollar store or Walmart. They lift the bag just enough to allow a small air flow beneath.
Back to the original discussion of watering, wet the top of the bag slowly until you see a half inch of water pooling on top, now walk away for about 15 mins come back and repeat. This allows the water to seep in and the soil will then easily take up the watering. Watering fast will only cause run off and your ladies will still be thirsty and unfeed.
As an indoor cultivator space is always at a premium. Much easier to wash dry and stack thirty plus pots vs. trying to stack and store large plastic pots.
Care of your bags for reusing is easy too! Simply dump the soil, spray out the excess dirt (outside) throw them in the washer with a cup of vinegar and a half cup of baking soda. After washing remove from washer shape them round allow them to dry fold and stack them.
 
Simba1

Simba1

148
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Super soil is a living soil and runoff should be kept to a minimum. Your wrapping plastic around those fabric pots defeats the purpose of using a fabric pot. Not a good idea and may lead to problems down stream.
I have put layer of clay pebbles at bottom of the pot also didnt cover the under with anythink only around the pot
 
growsince79

growsince79

7,924
313
Plastic. You spray it with bleach and hit it with the hose. And it's ready to reuse. You can stack like 50 of them in a stack. They're easy to move around. There is a reason nurseries use them.
My favorite is the square nursery pots. IDK why they just seem to work better than round. I just can't keep bugs from coming in through the bottom.
 
Ponky

Ponky

2,966
263
My favorite is the square nursery pots. IDK why they just seem to work better than round. I just can't keep bugs from coming in through the bottom.
Same. If you pack the corners with DE the can't pass. But yeah square boys are the easiest. Seem to break less too. Pick a heavy one up with one finger and it might crack. But other than that they're solid.
 
PipeCarver

PipeCarver

3,399
263
Same. If you pack the corners with DE the can't pass. But yeah square boys are the easiest. Seem to break less too. Pick a heavy one up with one finger and it might crack. But other than that they're solid.
The roots grow better in the fabric over plastic. In plastic the roots run down the sides and around the bottoms and few of the roots penetrate to the middle of the soil. I harvested a 2 month vegged Tangy99 and I pulled the pot to re-use..no roots to be seen.....They are using all of the soil.....I like that
 
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Ponky

Ponky

2,966
263
The roots grow better in the fabric over plastic. In plastic the roots run down the sides and around the bottoms and few of the roots penetrate to the middle of the soil. I harvested a 2 month vegged Tangy99 and I pulled the pot to re-use..no roots to be seen.....They are using all of the soil.....I like that
Something went wrong. Usually a finished pot is full of roots. What happened?
 
T

TryingToGrow

Supporter
295
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I use one gallon pots only - fabric, plastic nursery and plastic water jug.

Fabric is mostly bad for me because I want to be able to check pot weight with 1 hand, it is not ridged for that.

My favorite is the square one gallon water jug (no handles), no holes, cover top soil with piece of plastic. Working on moving everything to them, just need to drink more water.

Lights off, not a great pic. But yeah, let’s me see what’s up down there too.
Image


Organic soil

My fabric pots And nursery pots are wrapped in plastic, otherwise to wet in the tent.

Fan is being elevated by coffee mate jug
 
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