Best enzyme test

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Joe Fresh

Joe Fresh

i seen this done a few years ago by a hydro shop doing a test comparing different enzymes....cannazyme was the only one to eat through paper...and as you can see here in a test done by CANNA, it complete dissolves paper in 12 hrs...


so would this mean its the strongest enzyme out there? does this eqaute to the best? ive tried snsizyme and hygrozyme, i didnt see anything special about them...
 
Shamus

Shamus

first off if ur straight water looks like cannazym ur fuckin up n shouldnt be drinking that nasty shit
i wanna actually do this test right with real roots
ill use
~pondzyme
~hygrozyme (my preferred)
~sensizyme
~cannazyme
~the nectar of the gods enzyme (idk what its called)

am i missing anything?
 
squiggly

squiggly

If you're going to compare enzymes its important that they act on the same substrate and are of the same type.

Enzymes are proteins, they have a specific structure and reactivity that only allows them to interact with molecules of a VERY specific structure and reactivity. It's not proper to compare them in this fashion.

For instance, it makes no sense to compare the kinetics of an oxidase to those of a transmutase--they do different things, act on different substrates, and produce different products. Apples and oranges hardly covers it from the biochemical perspective.

It's more like apples and skyscrapers.
 
justanotherbozo

justanotherbozo

If you're going to compare enzymes its important that they act on the same substrate and are of the same type.

Enzymes are proteins, they have a specific structure and reactivity that only allows them to interact with molecules of a VERY specific structure and reactivity. It's not proper to compare them in this fashion.

For instance, it makes no sense to compare the kinetics of an oxidase to those of a transmutase--they do different things, act on different substrates, and produce different products. Apples and oranges hardly covers it from the biochemical perspective.

It's more like apples and skyscrapers.
...maybe you might opine on which of the enzymatic choices would be most helpful in our specific circumstance?

...that is the purpose of this test after all.

peace, bozo
 
jiggaboojones

jiggaboojones

I am to agree with the chemist up there . canna is what I use because they have designed it to work in allof their products . soil hydro or coco . as well as having their coco specific line . and as for using sil organics and things of that nature my choice would b hygrozyme due to the success many professional gardners use it for all types of gardens canna or other ... its twice as thick as many of the others I see also . even thicker n darker than canazyme .. I have noproblems with cannazyme tho it works just fine
 
squiggly

squiggly

...maybe you might opine on which of the enzymatic choices would be most helpful in our specific circumstance?

...that is the purpose of this test after all.

peace, bozo

Generally speaking my guess is we're looking to clear out dead root mass, that means eating up cellulose. Cellulose differs from other polysaccharides like starches and glycogen by the type of linkage between monomers. Most starches have an alpha-1-4 linkage, cellulose has a beta-1-4 linkage. A specific enzyme is, thus, required to break it down. This is why cellulose is part of our fiber intake, as we do not have endogenous enzymes to break it down with.

Paper is typically made up of cellulose pulp, so for that reason I'm inclined to go with the shit that's eating up the paper. But enzymes have different efficiencies under different circumstances--temperature, wetness/dryness, accessible surface area of material, and so on. In practice the best thing to do is set up some dixie cups, grow some roots out, and then kill them. Watering them as you normally would, keeping them where you normally would--and then observe the results periodically. It would help immensely if you had a way to visualize the root zone while the breakdown was occuring (or a way to see progress without disrupting the soil). For instance, if you were to do this same experiment in a pot with a plexiglass cross section (ie 1 half of a pot affixed to plexiglass that you can put in darkness so as to not disturb root growth, but uncover when you want to see what's happening)--you could take pictures in a standardized way, take measurements, and really get some good data.

Then, ultimately, do the same thing in larger pots to confirm your results.

By then my guess is you'll have a clear winner in hand. It may be that the one that eats through the paper is the best (and if I had to hypothesize, that would be my guess)--but if you actually do the proper testing you'll know rather than think.

EDIT:

Just to clarify, you're doing a similar experiment as the video here--you're just doing it under your real conditions. The real model often deviates from the ideal model when its put to the test, and that's why it's important to do this. Its because *similar* isn't *same*--and a cup filled with liquid and paper isn't the same as a pot filled with soil and roots.
 
baba G

baba G

bean sprouts are tasty
If one is in soil or such a medium and rocking beneficials/teas and organics I wouldn't use any of the enzymatic products as your medium is producing it if it's hearty/healthy. But for sterile mediums/conditions it does a lot and for cleaning mediums it does speed things up but keep in mind people have been reusing soil and the planet is "reusing" soil without these products....
 
baba G

baba G

bean sprouts are tasty
first off if ur straight water looks like cannazym ur fuckin up n shouldnt be drinking that nasty shit
i wanna actually do this test right with real roots
ill use
~pondzyme
~hygrozyme (my preferred)
~sensizyme
~cannazyme
~the nectar of the gods enzyme (idk what its called)

am i missing anything?
poseidenzyme or whatever they call it from Nectar for the gods is just a Nitrozyme replacement. It's just seaweed, not a comparable enzyme product as the others you have listed, I think...
 
baba G

baba G

bean sprouts are tasty
Generally speaking my guess is we're looking to clear out dead root mass, that means eating up cellulose. Cellulose differs from other polysaccharides like starches and glycogen by the type of linkage between monomers. Most starches have an alpha-1-4 linkage, cellulose has a beta-1-4 linkage. A specific enzyme is, thus, required to break it down. This is why cellulose is part of our fiber intake, as we do not have endogenous enzymes to break it down with.

Paper is typically made up of cellulose pulp, so for that reason I'm inclined to go with the shit that's eating up the paper. But enzymes have different efficiencies under different circumstances--temperature, wetness/dryness, accessible surface area of material, and so on. In practice the best thing to do is set up some dixie cups, grow some roots out, and then kill them. Watering them as you normally would, keeping them where you normally would--and then observe the results periodically. It would help immensely if you had a way to visualize the root zone while the breakdown was occuring (or a way to see progress without disrupting the soil). For instance, if you were to do this same experiment in a pot with a plexiglass cross section (ie 1 half of a pot affixed to plexiglass that you can put in darkness so as to not disturb root growth, but uncover when you want to see what's happening)--you could take pictures in a standardized way, take measurements, and really get some good data.

Then, ultimately, do the same thing in larger pots to confirm your results.

By then my guess is you'll have a clear winner in hand. It may be that the one that eats through the paper is the best (and if I had to hypothesize, that would be my guess)--but if you actually do the proper testing you'll know rather than think.

EDIT:

Just to clarify, you're doing a similar experiment as the video here--you're just doing it under your real conditions. The real model often deviates from the ideal model when its put to the test, and that's why it's important to do this. Its because *similar* isn't *same*--and a cup filled with liquid and paper isn't the same as a pot filled with soil and roots.
Correct me if I"m wrong but isn't one of the main methods for cultivating enzymes utilizing bacteria to produce them?
 
leadsled

leadsled

GrowRU
Correct me if I"m wrong but isn't one of the main methods for cultivating enzymes utilizing bacteria to produce them?

Glucose, produced during photosynthesis, is the foundational building block used to build all the rest of the plants compounds, as well as the energy source that fuels cell division and cell expansion. There are obviously many different groups and many different types of compounds within a plants structure, including all types of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and plant secondary metabolites.


In the metabolic processes of forming all of these compounds from glucose, many thousands of different enzymes are engaged as catalysts in developing complete compounds. Each enzyme is similar to an end wrench; as a wrench can only fit one size nut or bolt properly, and enzyme can only trigger on specific type of reaction, also like a wrench, it can produce that same reaction over and over again without being used up. These enzymes are key to the entire process of building higher order compounds, which are the foundation of a plants immune system.


In order for these enzymes to function, each of these enzymes requires what is termed an enzyme ‘co-factor’. Without the enzyme cofactors, the enzyme will not be able to perform, complete compounds are not created as needed and plant immunity crashes. These enzyme cofactors are trace mineral keys such as zinc, manganese, copper, iron, molybdenum, selenium, cobalt, nickel, etc. etc. Plant physiologists have identified as many as 58 mineral enzyme cofactors in plants.
 
leadsled

leadsled

GrowRU
I did the same test. Only one that broke down celluose was cannazyme.There lineup works well in coco coir and I used it when I grew in coco with salts.

Organic method of producing enzymes for plants.

The Enzymes are a catalyst that assist the other nutrients and help super charge your soil.

Instead of buying an expensive enzyme product in a bottle, you can make your own! It is beneficial to humans and plants

Clackamas coot shared this one:

Super Sprouted Tea Version 2.0: (Credit to some old Coot)

56 Grams Barley Seed (2 Ounces)
Soak for 8 hours with Clean Water
Should now weigh minimum 84 Grams (If not soak longer)

Sprout seeds until tail is as long as the seed or about 1-2 days.

Blend in a food blender or whatever you have with a little but of water to help it blend.

Add this to 5 gallons water and you have one of the worlds most nutritious Plant Enzyme Teas available for PENNIES.

Typical GroZymes and Plant Enzyme Bottled Nutrients want to charge you for their secret ingredient.... Barley. And it ain't Cheap.


Barley is used in virtually all the Pond Clean Enzyme Bottles and many other products, stop wasting money and make it yourself.Interesting Fact:

Romans would give children that lost a mother at a young age a mixture of blended barley sprouts with honey and colostrum.

Don't you just love feeding your plants human grade food?


 
squiggly

squiggly

Correct me if I"m wrong but isn't one of the main methods for cultivating enzymes utilizing bacteria to produce them?

Yes, you copy the gene into a fast proliferating bacteria like E Coli. Typically you put it upstream of a highly upregulated protein so that many copies will be made. You grow the things out, then you put em under high/low pressure to get membrane lysis (opens the membrane and lets everything spill out) and then you purify them. Its quite a bit more involved than that, but that's the gist of it.
 

Jalisco Kid

Guest
This it?
Can you explain a little about the benefits you've seen when using it?
It clears my nutes up if they get cloudy,I use it for that or if I messed with the roots much.
I use it the last day before harvest,then after I shut down the sys for harvest I let it soak for 24 hours. Come back rinse out my tanks and spray 35% peroxide. I am then good to go for most runs. JK
 

Jalisco Kid

Guest
I followed that link, my bottle does not have step 2 written on it. Buy a pt unless you are running some real rooms. 1 qt treated 67,000 gal. 32 bucks. JK
 
B

Bangarang

Does the care free pond enzyme interfer with ACT's? Also do you use this product throughout your grow (ie. Once a week)?
Been reading about it but still unclear on these things. 15-30ml per 100Gal?
 
We Solidarity

We Solidarity

just wanna say that the paper test seems like bs - comparing paper to cellulose is like comparing "pasteurized prepared cheese product" to Tillamook...sure it's made from the same thing, but it's been altered to the point where it's unrecognizable.

Pretty sure cannazym has phosphoric acid in it as a pH stabilizer...that would definitely break paper down overnight. I know hi-brix uses phosphoric acid as a preservative and pH stabilizer and I've seen it dissolve paper too. Same with coca cola...

Not to say cannazym doesn't work, but the fact that it's doing something no other agricultural enzyme product (even professional ones) do just says to me that there's something else in it.
 
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