Breed Your Own Mycorrhizae

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Wishbone

Wishbone

323
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Can anyone recommend a myco brand? @Organikz

Here’s my plan for my upcoming indoor run, anyone see any issues with this?

I’m taking the soil from my greenhouse run this fall, already harvested a few plants, and put it in a bin and added a few reamendments including blood meal, seabird guano, azomite, langbeinite and oyster, and added harvest scraps. Plan to order some myco, add oatmeal, mbp and molassses, worms. Let sit for a month or two, then begin the next run.

Any issues with this? Getting cold here in CO, do I need to keep this inside?
 
Organikz

Organikz

3,562
263
Can anyone recommend a myco brand? @Organikz

Here’s my plan for my upcoming indoor run, anyone see any issues with this?

I’m taking the soil from my greenhouse run this fall, already harvested a few plants, and put it in a bin and added a few reamendments including blood meal, seabird guano, azomite, langbeinite and oyster, and added harvest scraps. Plan to order some myco, add oatmeal, mbp and molassses, worms. Let sit for a month or two, then begin the next run.

Any issues with this? Getting cold here in CO, do I need to keep this inside?
Inside would be ideal. I think you will find that you won't need additional myco. Your soil will likely be jumping with it. The grain feeds fungal networks in a big way. If I recall correctly oatmeal and other grains are used as substrate for mushrooms.
 
Wishbone

Wishbone

323
93
Inside would be ideal. I think you will find that you won't need additional myco. Your soil will likely be jumping with it. The grain feeds fungal networks in a big way. If I recall correctly oatmeal and other grains are used as substrate for mushrooms.

Right on, less shit to buy is always good, thanks for the input.
 
B

bibiking

65
18
I did as you wrote, and I now how something, which is for sure mycorrhizae or mold. how do I know the difference?
 
Funkadelic

Funkadelic

808
93
My mistake was too much water in a sealed container. Went anaerobic fast and smelled like death. Going to use a big tub with a tarp next!
 
Racetowin02

Racetowin02

12
13
I wanted to Re-Post this thread for those interested...


I found that it is a lot of info on the web on how to use mycorrhizae, but not on how to breed it ourselves. I guess this is because many companies need to make money from a product that is extremely easy to breed, and needed for increased growth. Never buy mycorrhizae again. $60 a bottle is expensive so lets do it.

1. Purchase whatever Mycorrhizae brand that you like best. Make sure you get the good stuff for this is what you'll be breeding from here on out.



2. Get any bucket or tub to place some soil in. I use a 30 gallon tote because I will be using it throughout my grow and bloom cycle. I also have a few extra totes to increase my fungi yield.



3. Place the soil in the tote or totes you are using and make sure it is moist but not too damp. Water it as if your germinating seedlings. Use organic soil because chemicals tend to kill fungi, so this goes the same for watering.


4. Add oatmeal to the soil mix for the fungi to feed off of and mix it through the soil evenly.


5. Add sugars to your soil mix for the fungi to feed off of also. It isn't any sense in adding carboload or bloom boosters to the mix because it is expensive. The fungi feed off plain sugars such as grain sugars and molasses. Make sure its mixed throughout the soil.


6. Now for the water: water the mix throughout but not too much. Do not use city water because the chlorine products in it will kill off fungi. Instead use rain water or melted snow to water with. But do not use snow if your gonna use the soil, because melted snow slows plant growth. Distilled water is great but gets costly.


7. Now we can add the mycorrhizae that we spent so much money on to the mix. Take powder mycorrhizae and sprinkle some over the top or take liquid mycorrhizae and spray it over the top of the soil mix with a spray bottle.


8. Place a heating pad under the soil container and keep it on high if the tote is large and medium if the tote is small. Theres no need to buy a very expensive heat mat.


9. Make sure to cover the container because fungi need a dark place to grow. Lights will kill them if kept on them for long periods.

Wait a few days and you will see the fungi colonizing. It will look white and fuzzy and you will think mold Nooooooooooo, but this is what you are after. The more fungi you add to the soil the faster it will colonize, but much isn't needed at one time. They will pretty much multiply from any point.



Keep feeding them sugar and oatmeal if you want. Some individuals plant a plant to let the fungi sync with then very little feeding is needed. It's great to throw a store bought potatoe in the soil for the fungi to work with. Also add some bennies to the soil over time. Give the fungi a few days to grow and colonize before adding bacteria, for bacteria eats fungi in its early stage.


When you want to start another tub of mycorrhizae fungi just take some fungi or soil and transfer it to a new soil container, and allow it to multiply.

Try not to break up the colony as much as possible but if so, dont worry they will do there thing in no time. I mix my fungi throughout the soil so I can pull out one big cake to add to my dwc system.

If watering try not to damage the colony. Try to gently spray unchlorinated water to the top of the soil. If adding more fungi: do the same.

Now never run out of your favorite brand again!

day 2



day 3



day 4
Thanks coat is everything !
 
Swampland.J701

Swampland.J701

38
33
That's awesome you have enough to make a lot of good compost...I too wonder about any leftover nutes, I don't think it be a problem for any microherd if organic? However, I would imagine if you are going to use the compost in a tea or to mix in to your medium it would add to it...I'm thinking if you breed mykos in it they will break down those leftover organic nutrients and make them more available to your plant!



I would take some samples of it, see if it's still loaded up,
If the PPM is too high for your liking maybe you can flush it? I wouldn't want to flush those good organic nutes though...I'm not sure how long the organic nutrients might stay active in a re-used soil?
 
Swampland.J701

Swampland.J701

38
33
Great
Great info fellas! I use recycled soil however I run it thru my compost pile first adding decayed leaves, worms, natural sugars, micros, constantly keeping the pile as humid as possible allowing atleast 6 months before reusing then I'll add my other amendments like bloodmeal,bonemeal, and natural salts prior to planting and maybe lime depending on weather the plants are in veg or going into flower after taking ph test!
 
808Pakalolo

808Pakalolo

39
18
I wanted to Re-Post this thread for those interested...


I found that it is a lot of info on the web on how to use mycorrhizae, but not on how to breed it ourselves. I guess this is because many companies need to make money from a product that is extremely easy to breed, and needed for increased growth. Never buy mycorrhizae again. $60 a bottle is expensive so lets do it.

1. Purchase whatever Mycorrhizae brand that you like best. Make sure you get the good stuff for this is what you'll be breeding from here on out.



2. Get any bucket or tub to place some soil in. I use a 30 gallon tote because I will be using it throughout my grow and bloom cycle. I also have a few extra totes to increase my fungi yield.



3. Place the soil in the tote or totes you are using and make sure it is moist but not too damp. Water it as if your germinating seedlings. Use organic soil because chemicals tend to kill fungi, so this goes the same for watering.


4. Add oatmeal to the soil mix for the fungi to feed off of and mix it through the soil evenly.


5. Add sugars to your soil mix for the fungi to feed off of also. It isn't any sense in adding carboload or bloom boosters to the mix because it is expensive. The fungi feed off plain sugars such as grain sugars and molasses. Make sure its mixed throughout the soil.


6. Now for the water: water the mix throughout but not too much. Do not use city water because the chlorine products in it will kill off fungi. Instead use rain water or melted snow to water with. But do not use snow if your gonna use the soil, because melted snow slows plant growth. Distilled water is great but gets costly.


7. Now we can add the mycorrhizae that we spent so much money on to the mix. Take powder mycorrhizae and sprinkle some over the top or take liquid mycorrhizae and spray it over the top of the soil mix with a spray bottle.


8. Place a heating pad under the soil container and keep it on high if the tote is large and medium if the tote is small. Theres no need to buy a very expensive heat mat.


9. Make sure to cover the container because fungi need a dark place to grow. Lights will kill them if kept on them for long periods.

Wait a few days and you will see the fungi colonizing. It will look white and fuzzy and you will think mold Nooooooooooo, but this is what you are after. The more fungi you add to the soil the faster it will colonize, but much isn't needed at one time. They will pretty much multiply from any point.



Keep feeding them sugar and oatmeal if you want. Some individuals plant a plant to let the fungi sync with then very little feeding is needed. It's great to throw a store bought potatoe in the soil for the fungi to work with. Also add some bennies to the soil over time. Give the fungi a few days to grow and colonize before adding bacteria, for bacteria eats fungi in its early stage.


When you want to start another tub of mycorrhizae fungi just take some fungi or soil and transfer it to a new soil container, and allow it to multiply.

Try not to break up the colony as much as possible but if so, dont worry they will do there thing in no time. I mix my fungi throughout the soil so I can pull out one big cake to add to my dwc system.

If watering try not to damage the colony. Try to gently spray unchlorinated water to the top of the soil. If adding more fungi: do the same.

Now never run out of your favorite brand again!

day 2



day 3



day 4
Malo Uso,
I'm a first time grower taking notes and your so far make sense to me. Not saying others don't know what their doing. But the process you hust explained is what I've been doing with my soil. I put cracked dried egg shells, Orage peels chopped up and cucumber peels chopped. Never thought of oats but willing to try and my brahdah told me to add rice with the oats. Your tjoughts appreciated. Mahalo🤙🏾
 
808Pakalolo

808Pakalolo

39
18
I wanted to Re-Post this thread for those interested...


I found that it is a lot of info on the web on how to use mycorrhizae, but not on how to breed it ourselves. I guess this is because many companies need to make money from a product that is extremely easy to breed, and needed for increased growth. Never buy mycorrhizae again. $60 a bottle is expensive so lets do it.

1. Purchase whatever Mycorrhizae brand that you like best. Make sure you get the good stuff for this is what you'll be breeding from here on out.



2. Get any bucket or tub to place some soil in. I use a 30 gallon tote because I will be using it throughout my grow and bloom cycle. I also have a few extra totes to increase my fungi yield.



3. Place the soil in the tote or totes you are using and make sure it is moist but not too damp. Water it as if your germinating seedlings. Use organic soil because chemicals tend to kill fungi, so this goes the same for watering.


4. Add oatmeal to the soil mix for the fungi to feed off of and mix it through the soil evenly.


5. Add sugars to your soil mix for the fungi to feed off of also. It isn't any sense in adding carboload or bloom boosters to the mix because it is expensive. The fungi feed off plain sugars such as grain sugars and molasses. Make sure its mixed throughout the soil.


6. Now for the water: water the mix throughout but not too much. Do not use city water because the chlorine products in it will kill off fungi. Instead use rain water or melted snow to water with. But do not use snow if your gonna use the soil, because melted snow slows plant growth. Distilled water is great but gets costly.


7. Now we can add the mycorrhizae that we spent so much money on to the mix. Take powder mycorrhizae and sprinkle some over the top or take liquid mycorrhizae and spray it over the top of the soil mix with a spray bottle.


8. Place a heating pad under the soil container and keep it on high if the tote is large and medium if the tote is small. Theres no need to buy a very expensive heat mat.


9. Make sure to cover the container because fungi need a dark place to grow. Lights will kill them if kept on them for long periods.

Wait a few days and you will see the fungi colonizing. It will look white and fuzzy and you will think mold Nooooooooooo, but this is what you are after. The more fungi you add to the soil the faster it will colonize, but much isn't needed at one time. They will pretty much multiply from any point.



Keep feeding them sugar and oatmeal if you want. Some individuals plant a plant to let the fungi sync with then very little feeding is needed. It's great to throw a store bought potatoe in the soil for the fungi to work with. Also add some bennies to the soil over time. Give the fungi a few days to grow and colonize before adding bacteria, for bacteria eats fungi in its early stage.


When you want to start another tub of mycorrhizae fungi just take some fungi or soil and transfer it to a new soil container, and allow it to multiply.

Try not to break up the colony as much as possible but if so, dont worry they will do there thing in no time. I mix my fungi throughout the soil so I can pull out one big cake to add to my dwc system.

If watering try not to damage the colony. Try to gently spray unchlorinated water to the top of the soil. If adding more fungi: do the same.

Now never run out of your favorite brand again!

day 2



day 3



day 4
Tried it out and so far this is what I got
From 11May2020. Organic Nui Farm soil
(Local Oahu Business) Nui Chxn guano fertilizer, 3/4 bag Perlite, chopped orange peels, cucumber peels, dried eggshells, 3cups White long grain( Jasmine) rice soaked in H20 & 1 cup molasses, 3cups organic oats. Wet the soil withe water from the soaked rice. First time and this is some cool science class stuff. Mahalo&Aloha 🤙🏾
 
Flexnerb

Flexnerb

1,288
163
Tried it out and so far this is what I got
From 11May2020. Organic Nui Farm soil
(Local Oahu Business) Nui Chxn guano fertilizer, 3/4 bag Perlite, chopped orange peels, cucumber peels, dried eggshells, 3cups White long grain( Jasmine) rice soaked in H20 & 1 cup molasses, 3cups organic oats. Wet the soil withe water from the soaked rice. First time and this is some cool science class stuff. Mahalo&Aloha 🤙🏾
Which works better molases or brown sugar?
 
legitness

legitness

51
8
Add a sacrifical cutting to the pot..the fungal binds on the roots. Cover soil with cardboard as myco lobes cardboard woods.
Small led clip light or house bylb to keep cutting healthy.

Then strip leaves as they grow and drop them. Plant gets big chip it back down and let it co post the fungal wil feed on the leaves.

U can then feed any leaves to the bin and wil take max 1 week to digest. Topup the soil . And feed them nutrients like kelp anf neem. Dont fget crab shells as it has fish meal peotiens on it and ca etc.


Then if u wana add the worms too u can do.
They keep the networks going. And areate it for you .

Feed the top with barley and oatmeal . Enzymes and food.

Add mollasses to keep them happy..

Now when u want some u do the garden rice farming in your tub.

You have to keep it in ur grow room as myco bred out if the same wnviroment grown in will die .
 
R

RollingBall

11
3
@420Artie
So it is Fungal Mycelia, and it's already in the compost or vermicompost, and feeding it will activate and increase their numbers greatly prior to adding it to a compost tea where they will not multiply once added?

...Sorry my incorrect title on the thread...I am glad we have some one elaborate!

Mahalo @firstcitizen for sharing -My interpretation of that is Absolutely Priceless Knowledge. seriously, Thank yOu!

@DrMcSkunkins

Yeah Bradda! Have you tried burying the rice yet? I'm excited to get started, I have a couple pretty old trees I have in mind for a couple batches, and I'm scouting for some clumping bamboo to try out.

And I did try to activated the Fungi by putting some EWC in a small tray and adding some oatmeal and moistening it up, put it in the dark in a warm room, in just two days the whole tray was a white fluffy clump, stuck together with fungi.

-I still need to get a microscope to examine my teas!

Teaming with Microbes, by authors, Jeff Lowenfels and Wayne Lewis. In it, Lowenfels and Lewis suggest you "give fungi a head start." Since it can be difficult to get fungi to multiple (they do grow in size, just rarely in number) during the compost tea brewing process, the authors recommend growing them prior to the brewing process.To do this, you'll want to moisten a couple cups of compost (just damp, not dripping wet), and then put it in a light-resistant container. Then grind up some simple proteins (fungal foods), such as oatmeal, and mix them in with the moist compost. Cover partially with a lid, and then place in a warm, dark area. We typically put ours under our sink, or above our fridge in a cupboard. After about 3 days, you'll remove the lid, and find a bunch of fungal mycelia throughout the compost. You can now use this compost to brew your fungal tea.
Do you actually brew it?
 
Observationist

Observationist

5,320
313
I wanted to Re-Post this thread for those interested...


I found that it is a lot of info on the web on how to use mycorrhizae, but not on how to breed it ourselves. I guess this is because many companies need to make money from a product that is extremely easy to breed, and needed for increased growth. Never buy mycorrhizae again. $60 a bottle is expensive so lets do it.

1. Purchase whatever Mycorrhizae brand that you like best. Make sure you get the good stuff for this is what you'll be breeding from here on out.



2. Get any bucket or tub to place some soil in. I use a 30 gallon tote because I will be using it throughout my grow and bloom cycle. I also have a few extra totes to increase my fungi yield.



3. Place the soil in the tote or totes you are using and make sure it is moist but not too damp. Water it as if your germinating seedlings. Use organic soil because chemicals tend to kill fungi, so this goes the same for watering.


4. Add oatmeal to the soil mix for the fungi to feed off of and mix it through the soil evenly.


5. Add sugars to your soil mix for the fungi to feed off of also. It isn't any sense in adding carboload or bloom boosters to the mix because it is expensive. The fungi feed off plain sugars such as grain sugars and molasses. Make sure its mixed throughout the soil.


6. Now for the water: water the mix throughout but not too much. Do not use city water because the chlorine products in it will kill off fungi. Instead use rain water or melted snow to water with. But do not use snow if your gonna use the soil, because melted snow slows plant growth. Distilled water is great but gets costly.


7. Now we can add the mycorrhizae that we spent so much money on to the mix. Take powder mycorrhizae and sprinkle some over the top or take liquid mycorrhizae and spray it over the top of the soil mix with a spray bottle.


8. Place a heating pad under the soil container and keep it on high if the tote is large and medium if the tote is small. Theres no need to buy a very expensive heat mat.


9. Make sure to cover the container because fungi need a dark place to grow. Lights will kill them if kept on them for long periods.

Wait a few days and you will see the fungi colonizing. It will look white and fuzzy and you will think mold Nooooooooooo, but this is what you are after. The more fungi you add to the soil the faster it will colonize, but much isn't needed at one time. They will pretty much multiply from any point.



Keep feeding them sugar and oatmeal if you want. Some individuals plant a plant to let the fungi sync with then very little feeding is needed. It's great to throw a store bought potatoe in the soil for the fungi to work with. Also add some bennies to the soil over time. Give the fungi a few days to grow and colonize before adding bacteria, for bacteria eats fungi in its early stage.


When you want to start another tub of mycorrhizae fungi just take some fungi or soil and transfer it to a new soil container, and allow it to multiply.

Try not to break up the colony as much as possible but if so, dont worry they will do there thing in no time. I mix my fungi throughout the soil so I can pull out one big cake to add to my dwc system.

If watering try not to damage the colony. Try to gently spray unchlorinated water to the top of the soil. If adding more fungi: do the same.

Now never run out of your favorite brand again!

day 2



day 3



day 4
great fuckin idea, just made a little tub, put a fuckin ton of myco lol
 
Observationist

Observationist

5,320
313
Damn I should have taken a picture when it was milky white covered….I’ve added more sense probably too much lol

but damn it was poppin off
 
Image
Image
shaganja

shaganja

1,431
263
You can harvest mycorrhizae very simple. You need just to wash the roots in chloride free water from harvest plant.
You can grow grasses for mycorrhizal collection like Rye.
You can infect jar with spoor seeds to grow mycorrhizal.
You can infect your compost .....


How to harvest microorganisms
Did this last year. Pics on "no till regenerative" thread. The colonies in the rice is so cool. So many different colors.
 
mushtr011

mushtr011

1
3

Do Mycorrhizal Fungi Grow Mushrooms?​

Some, but not all, mycorrhizal fungi grow mushrooms. The ones that do typically form associations with woody trees and shrubs.
There are two main types of mycorrhizae, called ecto-mycorrhizae and endo-mycorrhizae.
The types of fungi that form endo-mycorrhizal associations inside the cells of many plant roots don’t produce typical mushrooms.
Higher fungi that produce edible mushrooms and truffles form ecto-mycorrhizal associations.
In ecto-mycorrhizal associations the mycelium forms an external sheath around the root’s surface.
The mycelium extends outwards from the roots into the surrounding soil, searching for organic matter and moisture.
Would this actually work on cannabis? Your myco needs to be endo-myco at least for it to work
 
R

ritoMox

700
143
Did this last year. Pics on "no till regenerative" thread. The colonies in the rice is so cool. So many different colors.
Yep, but see 420Artie's posts Here(post #17) and Here(post #19). What you usually collect with rice is imperfect fungi, otherwise know as fungi imperfecti: Link: Fungi imperfecti; it doesn't give mushrooms or form a mycorrhizal relationship with the plant. Still good, but different. There are many good books on the beneficial relationship between plants and mycorrhizal fungi✌🏻
 
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