Can i transplant from the ground into pots while weed plants are in two weeks flowering?

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Imzzaudae

Imzzaudae

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I grow organically as well. I think you should grab a couple of nice hand fulls of soil from your garden. Throw them in a bucket.
Add potato mash and water then set it in the sun. Water your plants with this. 1 part solution to 10 water, you can make a gallon with 1 potato. I don't bother with the paint strainer. I just toss everything in the bucket.

Do this once a week for the rest of the grow as well. Go easy with the bat and Chicken - both are pretty hot. You could likely get away with 1 cup of each in a 20 L bucket full of water.

Mix
1 L Microbe solution This is incredible stuff
2 Cups chicken and bat solution
18 L Water in a bucket.
Water your plants with this mix once a week.

I'm thinking with all the rain. What you fed your plants got washed away.
 
budrick

budrick

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I grow organically as well. I think you should grab a couple of nice hand fulls of soil from your garden. Throw them in a bucket.
Add potato mash and water then set it in the sun. Water your plants with this. 1 part solution to 10 water, you can make a gallon with 1 potato. I don't bother with the paint strainer. I just toss everything in the bucket.

Do this once a week for the rest of the grow as well. Go easy with the bat and Chicken - both are pretty hot. You could likely get away with 1 cup of each in a 20 L bucket full of water.

Mix
1 L Microbe solution This is incredible stuff
2 Cups chicken and bat solution
18 L Water in a bucket.
Water your plants with this mix once a week.

I'm thinking with all the rain. What you fed your plants got washed away.
So I just remembered. I was sprinkling black disinfectant around the garden because some of my cats were constantly pooping near the plants. When the rain fell, it seems like it soaked in the soil! Sigh!!!!! I wonder if there's any solution to this!!!!! Plants aren't looking up rn.
 
budrick

budrick

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So I just remembered. I was sprinkling black disinfectant around the garden because some of my cats were constantly pooping near the plants. When the rain fell, it seems like it soaked in the soil! Sigh!!!!! I wonder if there's any solution to this!!!!! Plants aren't looking up rn.
 
Imzzaudae

Imzzaudae

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Wow. I am simply at a loss for suggestions. I just don't know how to help you other than give them some time and see if they come back for you.
 
Oldchucky

Oldchucky

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I think I would try digging up a couple of them and putting them into some fresh dirt in pots after rinsing off the roots. It’s a hail Mary, but it doesn’t look like you have much to lose! Maybe too far gone.
 
Oldchucky

Oldchucky

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A year or two ago some guy had a plant outdoors in the ground, just dying away! Look as bad as if not worse than yours. He dug it up and planted it in a wheelbarrow full of dirt. It came back from the brink of death to become a good plant. So, as long as there is some green, don’t give up! And don’t be afraid to try different things!
 
Captspaulding

Captspaulding

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What's the soil like now, after all that rain? Is it muddy? Compact and hard? I wonder if there are any bugs destroying roots......
Or root rot, it really looks like those plants just face planted into a brick wall after heavy rains and a myriad of teas and composting methods. It’s the only thing it could be at this point. The plants stressed to the gills. Which I fear it needs at this point.
 
Captspaulding

Captspaulding

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Or root rot, it really looks like those plants just face planted into a brick wall after heavy rains and a myriad of teas and composting methods. It’s the only thing it could be at this point. The plants stressed to the gills. Which I fear it needs at this point.
So I would have to agree with the folks who posted earlier, you may only have the nuclear option at this point, digging them up, rinsing the root ball, and getting in new soil. At this point, I would.
 
budrick

budrick

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Sooooo.... I just transplanted them. No roots got damaged. Roots smelled awful tho. Washed them out real good, placed them in a bucket of water. Went to the back on an adventure for some medium. Got some top quality soil, rotten wood, mixed with some potting mix and a tincture of cured chicken manure and shaked that up. Carefully made a hole to transplant. I used chicken feed bags instead of pots tho. I only transplanted one in another location directly in the soil. Here's the video. I'm persistent, yo.
 
Captspaulding

Captspaulding

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Sooooo.... I just transplanted them. No roots got damaged. Roots smelled awful tho. Washed them out real good, placed them in a bucket of water. Went to the back on an adventure for some medium. Got some top quality soil, rotten wood, mixed with some potting mix and a tincture of cured chicken manure and shaked that up. Carefully made a hole to transplant. I used chicken feed bags instead of pots tho. I only transplanted one in another location directly in the soil. Here's the video. I'm persistent, yo.
The smelly roots is a tell tale sign of root rot, you did the right thing. I hope they bounce back for you friend.
 
budrick

budrick

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The smelly roots is a tell tale sign of root rot, you did the right thing. I hope they bounce back for you friend.
Thanks! Yeah I suspected that. Lesson learnt. I actually live in a rain forest and this was my second time planting directly in the soil. I normally use 5 gal buckets but I just wanted to try out the soil for a change. But ya I'm positive they'll bounce back and flourish! I've already set some beans to germinate in case they don't. But thanks again!
 
Harpua88

Harpua88

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Or root rot, it really looks like those plants just face planted into a brick wall after heavy rains and a myriad of teas and composting methods. It’s the only thing it could be at this point. The plants stressed to the gills. Which I fear it needs at this point.
Yeah, too much water and too much stuff. The answers are in the rotting root balls.
 
budrick

budrick

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What's the soil like now, after all that rain? Is it muddy? Compact and hard? I wonder if there are any bugs destroying roots......
Yes it was muddy but not that compact. The roots came out quite easily but I've noticed it where I dug was muddy.
 
Harpua88

Harpua88

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Yes it was muddy but not that compact. The roots came out quite easily but I've noticed it where I dug was muddy.
Being muddy is just another aspect of the larger problem. Roots need oxygen too, so while there may have been other causes of the roots being sick, they're essentially drowning on top of it.

You're doing everything you can to fight the weather.......usually the weather wins. But regardless of how these turn out, it's a good opportunity to rethink and rebuild your soil......at least one patch at a time. If you can till the soil, turn it, and mix various things into it, you can possibly outright solve this problem. Soil should be rich, but lighter, fluffy. You can mix a variety of things that will help with drainage, increase air to the roots, and better help your plants to use the nutrients you add........which shouldn’t be that much. Perlite is a big one that many growers use, it's light and it doesn't absorb water. There are quite a few others, soils and amendments, where you can build a great patch to grow in.

Also.......genetics. Some varieties are more resistant to things like bugs. mold.......see if you can get some seeds of strains that are more resistant to heavy rains, overwatering.....
 
Captspaulding

Captspaulding

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Being muddy is just another aspect of the larger problem. Roots need oxygen too, so while there may have been other causes of the roots being sick, they're essentially drowning on top of it.

You're doing everything you can to fight the weather.......usually the weather wins. But regardless of how these turn out, it's a good opportunity to rethink and rebuild your soil......at least one patch at a time. If you can till the soil, turn it, and mix various things into it, you can possibly outright solve this problem. Soil should be rich, but lighter, fluffy. You can mix a variety of things that will help with drainage, increase air to the roots, and better help your plants to use the nutrients you add........which shouldn’t be that much. Perlite is a big one that many growers use, it's light and it doesn't absorb water. There are quite a few others, soils and amendments, where you can build a great patch to grow in.

Also.......genetics. Some varieties are more resistant to things like bugs. mold.......see if you can get some seeds of strains that are more resistant to heavy rains, overwatering.....
Also I may add this, use a keen eye and try to see the gradient in your growing area, I have a feeling that the affected plants may have been in lower laying ground. My point is, if you can help it, always plant on higher ground.
 
budrick

budrick

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Being muddy is just another aspect of the larger problem. Roots need oxygen too, so while there may have been other causes of the roots being sick, they're essentially drowning on top of it.

You're doing everything you can to fight the weather.......usually the weather wins. But regardless of how these turn out, it's a good opportunity to rethink and rebuild your soil......at least one patch at a time. If you can till the soil, turn it, and mix various things into it, you can possibly outright solve this problem. Soil should be rich, but lighter, fluffy. You can mix a variety of things that will help with drainage, increase air to the roots, and better help your plants to use the nutrients you add........which shouldn’t be that much. Perlite is a big one that many growers use, it's light and it doesn't absorb water. There are quite a few others, soils and amendments, where you can build a great patch to grow in.

Also.......genetics. Some varieties are more resistant to things like bugs. mold.......see if you can get some seeds of strains that are more resistant to heavy rains, overwatering.....

Also I may add this, use a keen eye and try to see the gradient in your growing area, I have a feeling that the affected plants may have been in lower laying ground. My point is, if you can help it, always plant on higher ground.
I actually cut a plastic barrel I half and im about to go fill them with some selected medium. This is for my next batch. Rn I'm germinating some good strains so I'm prepping properly this time. Yeah higher altitude is the best. I've read the benefits you can gain doing so. More trichome production, less insects/fungus et al.
 
Captspaulding

Captspaulding

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I actually cut a plastic barrel I half and im about to go fill them with some selected medium. This is for my next batch. Rn I'm germinating some good strains so I'm prepping properly this time. Yeah higher altitude is the best. I've read the benefits you can gain doing so. More trichome production, less insects/fungus et al.
Precisely good sir. Roll with the shitty punches. You got this homie.
 
I

imhigh

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Hello there. I have an issue. Firstly i live in the caribbean and its officially rainy season. I currently have a few plants that are directly in the soil. We're getting above average tropical waves and due to heavy rainfall, two of my plants are drooping. My question is, can i transplant them from the soil and into a pot while they're in two weeks flowerinh phase? Sativa strains. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
If you have plants inside already don't bring them inside. Good way to introduce bugs. If keeping outside ,go for it. Easier to control watering and feeding. My opinion only.
 
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