Diagnosing nutrient problems in your plants

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mysticepipedon

mysticepipedon

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One of the posters in another thread requested that I post this separately, in hopes of making this a pinned thread. If any of the seasoned growers think it's about right, maybe it should be pinned. If not, please post corrections and maybe we can have a decent pinned post for people wondering why the leaves on a plant aren't behaving themselves and being green. I didn't want to post a bunch of pics of deficiency and toxicity photos. There are plenty of those around, already. And maybe step 5 should be removed, and prevent a slaughter of farm animals and pets.

The original post:


Certain deficiency symptoms, like magnesium (Mg), nitrogen (N) and potassium (K), you will see again and again, because they are so common.

If it's not an obvious one that you've seen before, start thinking about things in a step-wise manner:

1. What part of the plant is showing the symptom? Is it a growing point or mature leaves? If it is a growing point, the problem is an immobile nutrient in the plant. If it's a lower leaf, the problem is a mobile nutrient in the plant. ("In the plant" as opposed to "in the soil.")
2. Is your pH in the right range for your media/method of growing? If not, the nutrient might be in the soil, but it's not in a form the plant can take up. Adjusting the pH can make the nutrient more soluble and plant-available.
3. Is there any reason to believe an interaction with another nutrient is causing lockout? The reason could be that you just recently added a lot of calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P) or N. Look at the Mulders Chart to get a handle on possible nutrient interactions.

Mulders chart


Mobile nutrients include N, P, K, and Mg. These show up on lower leaves.

Immobile nutrients include Sulfur (S) — though some texts say it's mobile, Ca (though sometimes it's a little mobile), and just about all the micronutrients (the metals, like iron, manganese, copper, zinc, nickel). These show up on growing points.

Deficiency symptoms on lower leaves never go away when you fix the problem, so don't expect it. Deficiency symptoms at growing points usually do go away when you fix the problem.

4. Once you know whether it's a mobile or immobile nutrient, look at the assorted charts and pictures of the specific symptoms in a google search.

5. Sacrifice a goat* at an alter in front of your tent to let the plants know that you are on the case and searching for guidance.


*Two chickens and a hamster can substitute for a goat.
 
tobh

tobh

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@mysticepipedon great start but I think this can be extended significantly as Mulder's chart can be really difficult to understand without more detail. Excellent initial version though. However, I'm 90% sure Seamaiden or another one of the long gone greats put something together that is significantly more comprehensive and can be found via search. I'll put in some leg work and post the link here.

#5 got a little hairy. The wife walked in half way through the sacrifice.... hasn't spoke to me in 4 days. Plants still look like shit. Was the blood of the offering suppose to be mixed with the nutes?
Blood can be a fantastic source of nitrogen and carbon. I use bloodmeal outdoors in my raised beds. You'll never see more vigorous veg in soil as you do with a good dose of blood.
 
Skeggox

Skeggox

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I had to make due with 2 guineas from a stray flock of my neighbors and a field rat that my cat slaughtered. It may have been the way I acquired the sacrifice, it wasn't genuine.
@mysticepipedon great start but I think this can be extended significantly as Mulder's chart can be really difficult to understand without more detail. Excellent initial version though. However, I'm 90% sure Seamaiden or another one of the long gone greats put something together that is significantly more comprehensive and can be found via search. I'll put in some leg work and post the link here.


Blood can be a fantastic source of nitrogen and carbon. I use bloodmeal outdoors in my raised beds. You'll never see more vigorous veg in soil as you do with a good dose of blood.
That actually did not occur to me lol
 
tobh

tobh

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Alright, this link will be even better. It's a shame this subforum doesn't seem to get hit as much anymore, there is some absolute gold in here and covers what this thread barely scrapes on plus so much more.

The Cannabis Infirmary

That subforum has everything anyone should ever need to fix pests, deficiencies, toxicities, environmental issues, etc. If it's not there, then good luck.
 
sambapati

sambapati

1,127
163
One of the posters in another thread requested that I post this separately, in hopes of making this a pinned thread. If any of the seasoned growers think it's about right, maybe it should be pinned. If not, please post corrections and maybe we can have a decent pinned post for people wondering why the leaves on a plant aren't behaving themselves and being green. I didn't want to post a bunch of pics of deficiency and toxicity photos. There are plenty of those around, already. And maybe step 5 should be removed, and prevent a slaughter of farm animals and pets.

The original post:


Certain deficiency symptoms, like magnesium (Mg), nitrogen (N) and potassium (K), you will see again and again, because they are so common.

If it's not an obvious one that you've seen before, start thinking about things in a step-wise manner:

1. What part of the plant is showing the symptom? Is it a growing point or mature leaves? If it is a growing point, the problem is an immobile nutrient in the plant. If it's a lower leaf, the problem is a mobile nutrient in the plant. ("In the plant" as opposed to "in the soil.")
2. Is your pH in the right range for your media/method of growing? If not, the nutrient might be in the soil, but it's not in a form the plant can take up. Adjusting the pH can make the nutrient more soluble and plant-available.
3. Is there any reason to believe an interaction with another nutrient is causing lockout? The reason could be that you just recently added a lot of calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P) or N. Look at the Mulders Chart to get a handle on possible nutrient interactions.

Mulders chart


Mobile nutrients include N, P, K, and Mg. These show up on lower leaves.

Immobile nutrients include Sulfur (S) — though some texts say it's mobile, Ca (though sometimes it's a little mobile), and just about all the micronutrients (the metals, like iron, manganese, copper, zinc, nickel). These show up on growing points.

Deficiency symptoms on lower leaves never go away when you fix the problem, so don't expect it. Deficiency symptoms at growing points usually do go away when you fix the problem.

4. Once you know whether it's a mobile or immobile nutrient, look at the assorted charts and pictures of the specific symptoms in a google search.

5. Sacrifice a goat* at an alter in front of your tent to let the plants know that you are on the case and searching for guidance.


*Two chickens and a hamster can substitute for a goat.
excellent post....
 

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