First Organic Grow Plans

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Onetwothree

Onetwothree

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http://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/the-rhizosphere-roots-soil-and-67500617

This is a good paper on the rhizosphere and the science behind why PH is less of a big deal in organic/biodynamic soils. If youre in a hurry read the part about Root Exudates and Mineral Nutrition.

Thats not to say that if a very large portion if your soil (in this case rice hulls) is slowly breaking down and raising PH that the microbes and your plants will be able to buffer this conpletely, however it will certainly help smaller ph swings. And as Sea suggested, we are rarely operating in a perfect world.

Finally got a chance to read it, really great stuff in there! Thanks again. Also, I did some research on the "recharge" inoculate you mentioned...looks pretty legit. How often do you add it to your teas?
 
ArcticOrange

ArcticOrange

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Finally got a chance to read it, really great stuff in there! Thanks again. Also, I did some research on the "recharge" inoculate you mentioned...looks pretty legit. How often do you add it to your teas?

I always add it to my tea, i use tea once every 3 waterings in veg (usually sbout 2 or 3 times in veg) and most waterings in flower. Its probably overkill lol
 
ArcticOrange

ArcticOrange

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I will say I seem to get more "santas beard" when im using it in soil that im cooking off but that could be because i let my organic soil dry out too much between watering in containers. In my opinion the standard wet and dry cycles are not good for organic microherds. They need the moisture.
 
Onetwothree

Onetwothree

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I will say I seem to get more "santas beard" when im using it in soil that im cooking off but that could be because i let my organic soil dry out too much between watering in containers. In my opinion the standard wet and dry cycles are not good for organic microherds. They need the moisture.

Hmmm. That's interesting, I had heard that before but wasn't sure how valid it was. That's going to be tough for me because I am always letting my containers dry out before I feed again. I've always been taught water deep, not often. Maybe I'll shave a day off of my usual schedule in between feedings?
 
ArcticOrange

ArcticOrange

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Hmmm. That's interesting, I had heard that before but wasn't sure how valid it was. That's going to be tough for me because I am always letting my containers dry out before I feed again. I've always been taught water deep, not often. Maybe I'll shave a day off of my usual schedule in between feedings?

I mean im doing the same thing as you, as far as i know the lack of moisture wont kill them just make them dormant. I still let mine dry as i hate to overwater and its the method of watering i do best at so im not switching it up until my plants tell me to. For now theyre happy.
 
Onetwothree

Onetwothree

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I mean im doing the same thing as you, as far as i know the lack of moisture wont kill them just make them dormant. I still let mine dry as i hate to overwater and its the method of watering i do best at so im not switching it up until my plants tell me to. For now theyre happy.

Hey as long as they're happy, you're happy!
 
Dabominable

Dabominable

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You dont have to worry about PH in TEAs. That's about it. I ph everything else. Still good to check starting ph and finishing ph on teas, that way you know if one is going anerobic, and lets you know the actual time to wait for your tea to be where you want it personally.
 

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