HOW TO WATER COCO FOR BEST RESULTS.

  • Thread starter Aqua Man
  • Start date
  • Tagged users None
LuckyLuck

LuckyLuck

I have one question regarding watering on 360* stakes. I have high gph pump but low psi so my stakes gets really uneven watering. So i scroll through Aquaman’s mother hunt post and saw that i need at least 20psi pump. In my local store there is one pump but its too strong 69.5 Psi. I was thinking to install this pump put antisyphon brass spring valve and 40 psi pressure reducer from rain bird. I would put 4 orbit 8way manifold and 360* stakes. Do you guys thinks this gonna work?
 
Aqua Man

Aqua Man

Staff member
Supporter
I have one question regarding watering on 360* stakes. I have high gph pump but low psi so my stakes gets really uneven watering. So i scroll through Aquaman’s mother hunt post and saw that i need at least 20psi pump. In my local store there is one pump but its too strong 69.5 Psi. I was thinking to install this pump put antisyphon brass spring valve and 40 psi pressure reducer from rain bird. I would put 4 orbit 8way manifold and 360* stakes. Do you guys thinks this gonna work?
How many plants are we talking about you can get pumps really cheap if it's a smaller grow.
 
Frankster

Frankster

Calcium helps break down the salts levels in plant 🙃😉but like everything to much is not good to less is not got a good balance diet 👻🚂😜🤜🤛
So your saying this thing. Let me throw this onto the discussion..... When I'm mixing up my nutes, especially as I go up in ppm (I try to be on the warmer end of things, not too cold water, for better solubility...). I still notice lot's of white flakes floating around, and collecting at the bottoms, and it's both in veg mixtures, and my flowering mixtures, so it's certainly not excess phophate or potassium....

It's got to be simply excess calcium, or both calcium/nitrate.... Should I keep the mixture shaken, and try to evenly distribute? or perhaps, discard the sediments? please advise.

Is this a product of substandard cal/nitrate? and is there a difference between purity and batches.... solubility rates, ect....
Up till now, I've been taking it out now and again, swishing it with some liquid, and simply rub it into the tops of the soils, to allow it to penetrate....

Are possibly some semi-solids uptaken as a solute at simply the root level here? Is that what's happening? ie. Calcium is converted to a solute, before uptake..
I know it's a pretty technical question, but I would like to better understand the actual physiology involved in specific nutrient uptake.
 
Last edited:
Frankster

Frankster

Calcium is an essential plant nutrient. As the divalent cation (Ca2+), it is required for structural roles in the cell wall and membranes, as a counter‐cation for inorganic and organic anions in the vacuole, and as an intracellular messenger in the cytosol.

Can anyone add much to the physiology at play here?

Would be really interesting to have a thread dedicated to breaking down elements, documenting the relevant mechanisms at play, and how they enter the plant. Under what conditions, how it's done. Breaking down all the physiology at play here. We all know who the main actors are, the how is the big mystery.
 
Last edited:
Frankster

Frankster

Calcium helps break down the salts levels in plant 🙃😉but like everything to much is not good to less is not got a good balance diet 👻🚂😜🤜🤛
So what I'm getting from this, is that it's a carrier ion, and it needs to (possibly) be present, maybe a little in both forms.... Both as a solvent, and a solid. Or not...

This is the kinda stuff I'm really interested at the moment, learning equilibrium for each stages of development, getting the fluids up to exact specs, as possible, for each stage of plant maturity. It's my belief that much headway can be achieved in understanding this process well.

Getting this right will really magnify the watering table, when loaded correctly.
 
Last edited:
Ghosttrainx

Ghosttrainx

So your saying this thing. Let me throw this onto the discussion..... When I'm mixing up my nutes, especially as I go up in ppm (I try to be on the warmer end of things, not too cold water, for better solubility...). I still notice lot's of white flakes floating around, and collecting at the bottoms, and it's both in veg mixtures, and my flowering mixtures, so it's certainly not excess phophate or potassium....

It's got to be simply excess calcium, or both calcium/nitrate.... Should I keep the mixture shaken, and try to evenly distribute? or perhaps, discard the sediments? please advise.

Is this a product of substandard cal/nitrate? and is there a difference between purity and batches.... solubility rates, ect....
Up till now, I've been taking it out now and again, swishing it with some liquid, and simply rub it into the tops of the soils, to allow it to penetrate....

Are possibly some semi-solids uptaken as a solute at simply the root level here? Is that what's happening? ie. Calcium is converted to a solute, before uptake..
I know it's a pretty technical question, but I would like to better understand the actual physiology involved in specific nutrient uptake.
Not sure sure I was just saying in regards to eggshells it use in garden but indoor cal breaks the salt level with in the plant walls cells I am sure ??? And not sure about things floating in tank seems like a reaction like if u But a and B together with out mixing in water first it turns to salt crystals straight away 👻🚂
 
Ghosttrainx

Ghosttrainx

So what I'm getting from this, is that it's a carrier ion, and it needs to (possibly) be present, maybe a little in both forms.... Both as a solvent, and a solid. Or not...

This is the kinda stuff I'm really interested at the moment, learning equilibrium for each stages of development, getting the fluids up to exact specs, as possible, for each stage of plant maturity. It's my belief that much headway can be achieved in understanding this process well.

Getting this right will really magnify the watering table, when loaded correctly.
That's right it breaks down the salts so plant can absorb it easy as process it up more quicker I should say that's why it's got for deficiencies
 
Aqua Man

Aqua Man

Staff member
Supporter
So what I'm getting from this, is that it's a carrier ion, and it needs to (possibly) be present, maybe a little in both forms.... Both as a solvent, and a solid. Or not...

This is the kinda stuff I'm really interested at the moment, learning equilibrium for each stages of development, getting the fluids up to exact specs, as possible, for each stage of plant maturity. It's my belief that much headway can be achieved in understanding this process well.

Getting this right will really magnify the watering table, when loaded correctly.
Imo it's just to much work for little gain practically but definitely I find interesting from a learning perspective. Unfortunately it will take an immense amount of testing and time and even then with 2 pathways and every other grow condition affecting it plus different genetics it's a lifetime of lab work.

Lots of basics out there on this stuff and I'm sure studies. But trying to account for all the differnt parameters used in the studies makes this difficult to really get perfect.

But plants in general do well in a wide range of variables so I'm gonna stick with that as this parts well over my budget of time to learn. Not a bad idea to start a thread on it though.
 
Ghosttrainx

Ghosttrainx

When my power went out for 5 days and had no air pump in my 200 litre brain tank it was half full and as it was summer as well I had to get new pumps as the salts turned to rock on inside of tub and it was hard to get off as it coated everything in tub
 
Frankster

Frankster

That's right it breaks down the salts so plant can absorb it easy as process it up more quicker I should say that's why it's got for deficiencies
Yea, in the end, I think it's best to put some of that sediment at the top and work it's way downward, that way if some ion's that don't have the ++ pass though there the next day, they can attach themselves... Go be free... It's a strange metal, that we think of as white, but it's actually metallic, like all the rest.

I think the power of Ca+ is it's structure, it has an interesting energy state and shell configuration, that's a reoccurring theme in nature and especially in bio-chemistry. It's what I would label a key element. It's a highly synergistic element. ie. It moves other elements. It's a mover and a shaker. But it's macro, and it's immobile. So it needs to be constantly fed. It's (4s2) external shell is significant, but it's inner shell likely locks in place permanently, into the plant structure. That's my guess anyhow, I would have to look it up.

I was really good at figuring this shit. My professor wanted me to become a chemist, he was a really great teacher. 2 semesters of this crap, it can be a little confusing at first, but it's really not that difficult to understand. It's all about predicting bonds, and what can go where. Then figuring your molar masses....

I really think that a few elements are more important then the rest, during certain critical phases of development, and Ca+ is a big player, in flowering... Besides the more obvious ones.

The atomic number of calcium is 20 which means it has 20 protons and as an atom (not an ion) it also has 20 electrons. These are in four energy levels (1 though 4) and it has the following electron shell configuration
calcium2.JPG
calcium1.JPG


The first two (1s2) are in the innermost energy level/shell and the last two (4s2) are in the outermost energy level/shell. These last two are also the most likely to be removed to make a calcium ion.
 
Last edited:
LuckyLuck

LuckyLuck

Hey thnx for reply. Orbit is limited to 100psi i think and my pipes are pehd pipe that can handle more than 100. Im in europe and cant find anything that will fit my need. If thay have psi they get like very low gph rating. So im thinking going with stronger pump so if i want to double my plant count i can. we are thalking about of 20 plants max. I will buy pressure reducer and first go without it and see what happens.
 
Frankster

Frankster

Hey thnx for reply. Orbit is limited to 100psi i think and my pipes are pehd pipe that can handle more than 100. Im in europe and cant find anything that will fit my need. If thay have psi they get like very low gph rating. So im thinking going with stronger pump so if i want to double my plant count i can. we are thalking about of 20 plants max. I will buy pressure reducer and first go without it and see what happens.
the real key with pumps is how far they will pump something (head feet), and the pressure, volume, and overall diameter.. The pump needs to be matched to the lines. You certainly don't need that much pressure, I don't believe. Probably 2 psi would do fine, although 5-12 psi would probably be ideal. Possibly a timer. For all 20 plants, and you could regulate everything from the pump, if you got everything figured right. Do it for very cheap, and have excellent control.

The key with any watering system is a very dynamic thing. When you've got very small lines, and small distances, you don't need very much to power it. Is this just some sort of drip system? microfeeder of some type? or a hydro setup with big lines?


  • Flow rate adjustable: 0 GPH to 30 GPH
  • Flow rates at preset pressure of: 20 PSI is 14.3 GPH, 30 PSI is 18.7 GPH , 40 PSI is 21.6 GPH
  • Materials: Polyethylene
  • Operating pressure: 20 to 40 PSI
  • Pattern: 360
 
Top Bottom