Post your Organic Soil Mix

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SSgrower

SSgrower

Many ways thru nature, being raised in the country helps. Fox Farms is a trusted company. Coco mixing is interested me as well.
 
savagemonk

savagemonk

Canadian sourced:

ProMix organic and vermiculite 50/50

worm castings 10-30%

Amendments
mostly from Gaia Green such as:
4-4-4, 2-8-4, kelp, alfalfa, glacial rock dust, mineralized phosphate, gypsum

dolomitic limestone

Compost teas every week or two

dechlorinated water with molasses
 
AmWeedwolf

AmWeedwolf

8
2
3
Paramagnetism in soil comes primarily from elements which have an oxidation state of +2 (or a two electrons short of an octet in their outermost valence shell). So Mg, Ca, as well as some metals that can have various oxidation states (Mo, Fe, Co, etc.).

It has been physically demonstrated that increased paramagnetism in soil increases cation exchange capacity (which will increase the even interspersion of nutrients throughout the medium, as well as aid in uptake. You can think of this almost like an osmotic effect driven by magnetism, although that doesn't fully or quite accurately depict what's going on). --however I don't know about just having the shit in the room, this sounds like voodoo to me (which is not reality).

Adding any kind of rock dust to your soil should increase paramagnetism in the soil, you don't need a special designation of "paramagnetic rock". Azomite would fit that description, as do most rock dusts that one would consider ammending soil with (glacial rock dust, volcanic and basalt dust, etc.). As you can see, a good portion of us are indeed using such rock dusts (myself included)--but the effects can't be broken down into simply paramagnetic effects, this stuff also represents a nutrient source--and that's a confounding variable.
Cation exchange capacity (CEC) is not determined by the amount of cations available in the soil solution; it is determined by the number of negatively charged exchange sites in the soil medium, which are exclusively provided by mineral soil particles (sand, silt, and clay) and organic matter. Any increase in CEC (such as through the addition of clay or organic matter) will almost inevitably result in greater "paramagnatism" as paramagnetic cations in the soil solution will be bound to exchange sites rather than leaching out of the soil.

Adding rock dust (or other paramagnetic minerals) generally only increases paramagnatism significantly in soilless media; most (mineral) soils are rich in paramagnetic cations, especially ferrous (+2) iron and aluminum at moderately low pH. Also, most rock dusts are made from granite or basalt which contain significant, but trace, amounts of paramagnetic ions and few, if any, negatively charged exchange sites that improve the soil CEC. A better option would be greensand, which is relatively rich in them, especially iron, aluminum, calcium, potassium, and magnesium though it too contains a lot of silicon as well. As a bonus, greensand contains significant quantities of clay which actually increases soil CEC.
 
AmWeedwolf

AmWeedwolf

8
2
3
Anyone posting their recipes in this thread really needs to include their water source, pH, and hardness (Calcium and/or magnesium content) if applicable.

Thanks.
 
Stoobeey

Stoobeey

I started a new thread last week realizing I should have just posted here. So I have cooking now.

Sunshine sphagnum peat 33%
Black lava rock for aereation%33
Ewc 12%
Malibu bus compost 11%

Amendments per cuft

1c dolomite
1/2c kelp meal
1/2c crab meal
1/2c alfalfa
1/2c bone meal
2tbl langbenenite
2tbl humic acid
RO water

Been growing in roots orig and gen org go line for 3 years, time to throw them away. I have plants in amended roots or will be up potted to some soon for now that already cooked while my new stuff is working.. il make a few more cuft soon and probably use old roots for house plants I need to report. Or for seedlings.

How often do I need to think about too dressing .. I won't be in large containers. If it's weekly no biggie.. just trying to gauge a d understand this side . And teas every what 2 weeks?

Thanks
 
elduderito

elduderito

I'm recycling some soil that was hosting some males that were culled 2 weeks into flower... Originally it was a mix of plagron batmix, plagron allmix and another organic peat/coco/perlite medium...

I have bat guano (high P), seabird guano (high N), horn meal (high N), organic kelp & manure compost mix and EWC ....

I'm planning to add:
2 parts "used" soil
1 part Bio Bizz light mix
1 part EWC
1/2 part perlite (more or less depending what it looks like)

Per 50l (approx 1.8 cubic feet i believe)
6 cups kelp meal/manure compost
1cup bat guano
1/2 cup seabird guano
1/2 cup horn meal

As far as I can tell the manure is "composted" which I assume means it should be too hot - i.e. wouldn't have to let my soil mix rest for several weeks before using... what do you guys think?

Also - if I have some sativa dominant haze that Im planning on growing which could be N sensitive do I need to cut out the N rich amendments? I've read a lot of people say that they cut out the N in feeding early on in flower with hazes


I could buy some lime or rock powder but I thought I read this is only needed every 2 cycles...
 
Northernpop

Northernpop

I run a perpetual 9 plant Grow, and I'm done with messing on with complicated mixes that the plants may only be in for 2 months. So I'd recommend a good organic seed compost with an additional 20-30% perlite. Use a living soil granular fertiliser/nutrient mix like GAIA Green, or living soils fertiliser (UK). Then simply ph water when required. Its so simple, and the plants love it.

Everything the plant needs is in the mix, somewhere.
 
Stoobeey

Stoobeey

I run a perpetual 9 plant Grow, and I'm done with messing on with complicated mixes that the plants may only be in for 2 months. So I'd recommend a good organic seed compost with an additional 20-30% perlite. Use a living soil granular fertiliser/nutrient mix like GAIA Green, or living soils fertiliser (UK). Then simply ph water when required. Its so simple, and the plants love it.

Everything the plant needs is in the mix, somewhere.
Gaia isn't in the states, so it's stupid expensive. Plus I'm not looking for the easy road, I prefer to use different amendment so I can educated myself and understand how each works with the ppants5.. not just tossing some 444 stuff in my soil and calling it a day
 
Northernpop

Northernpop

Gaia isn't in the states, so it's stupid expensive. Plus I'm not looking for the easy road, I prefer to use different amendment so I can educated myself and understand how each works with the ppants5.. not just tossing some 444 stuff in my soil and calling it a day
It's available in the States and similar, and the full list of ingredients are clearly listed in the UK. It's also cheaper than bottle nuts, since you don't have to buy more amendments than required. You also don't meed a cement mixer.

However, every grower must find their preference. This just works for me.

IMG_20210130_144923.jpg
 
Bigeddy15

Bigeddy15

Canadian sourced:

ProMix organic and vermiculite 50/50

worm castings 10-30%

Amendments
mostly from Gaia Green such as:
4-4-4, 2-8-4, kelp, alfalfa, glacial rock dust, mineralized phosphate, gypsum

dolomitic limestone

Compost teas every week or two

dechlorinated water with molasses
How is this working out for you? I am also in Canada.
 
PiffinOut

PiffinOut

Im new here guys so cut me some slack. I know i should "lurk more" before speakin but. Why dont most of you use regular composted soil from your yard. waste and food scraps. I personally have a worm farm composter full of different worms. All my kitchen waste (minus meat) goes in the farm. So I get nutrient rich soil, and varios breeds EWC. If youre worried about fungus,bad bacteria or seeds you just put it on a low temp in the oven for a while and mix it every now and then (keep a window open). Or instead of that why not boil it in a pot by your fire pit or on the kitchen stove for a while. By boiling it you are not burning many nutrients in the process. You can use the left over water as a base to help feed your Then take it out after its been mineralized. You could do one method or the other or both. I used to boil small amounts with cheeseclothe it in a pot, now I bake it. Learned this method from the "Walstad Method" for planted fish tanks back when I was just and aquatic plant guy. The theory for planted tanks using this method is that it speed mineralizes the soil mix to prevent uncontrolled algae breakouts from uncontrolled nutrient availability in the water, its not so much for the bugs of the fungus or the seeds , as they dont live in aquatic situations more so for the nutrient availability.

Im not sure that any of that matters here, but in any case, I could only imagine most of you guys dont use regular soil and compost from home is because you like to fine tune things. The water by me is hard and the soil is mostly clay and sand. But I have a spot near my lawn compostings where the younger maples grow in the shade and anytime I need some decent mix in the spring or summer I can just go with a rake and loosen up some prime tiny rooted, leafy carbon and nutrient rich flufly soil full of beneficial white fungus that feed on the sugars. of the maple tree and leaf litter. I can use it as is as general compost mix soil or I can sift it and use the tiny little broken maple roots and black locust/oak/maple/grass compost as a seedling starter to substitute peat/coco coir in my vegetable garden. I have found that for me all sorts of compost both home found (eartworm castings from home food worm farm, yard compost pile, compost toilet)or found locally (maneur, chicken fish,horse, goat etc poop) and wood chips, bark, ash from the downed trees in the yard works amazing for my vegetables and my nutrient levels are off the charts following the principles Back to Eden method.
If liquid compost is your thing the worm farm steadlily produces dark compost juice at the bottom for me that to easily access. Since the worm factory is layered the best soil sinks to the bottom as the worms go up and down. When I want to use a new batch of compost tea I take cheeseclothe pouches and fill it with some bottom bin compost,yeast, sugar (preferrably molassas, a tiny bit of salt and some crumbed oak and maple tree leaves and some beneficial microbes,bacteria, and throw the pounches in a large pail full of either regular water, rain water, or old fish tank water. Depending how much or how little I want to use for tea, and depending who took the pail, I use a 5gal protein supplement jug.Then I take my old trusty fish tank air stones and toss them in there for a few days just to be sure, but you can get away with the first or second day if you add in some beer (preferably guiness) with your sugar and yeast to speed up the process.


In any case, sorry to rant, but I dont understand what all the fuss is about unless you guys
a)dont have a yard or outdoor setup or garage area for compost bins
b)dont want to compost things yourself
c) cant trust that your compost/soil is free from insecticides.
or
d) really want to know exactly what is going in, and treat this more like a )controlled) science experiment.
Please explain if I am underthinking all this. I hope I didnt come off as coy I even give my house plants my left over old, fish tank water while doing quarterly water changes. My fish only eat worms I grow, dapnia and aquarium plants so I know the source cuz I am the source.

Idk, I have farmers on both sides of my family and thats how they always did things, use what you got around you was the way they lived, nutrients are everywhere if you know how to find them and use them,, from your local farm to starbucks to your rotten salad greens and leftover egg shell, even in your poop and pee from a compost toilet.

What are everyones thoughts, why dont you guys go totally locally sourced, why dont you do this for your bush of choice

Also, if you guys could help me out in another thread, https://www.thcfarmer.com/threads/need-electric-help-4x4-arctic-alpine-12-with-12-cxm22-cobs.124501/ thatd be amazing. I dont mean to thread jack you guys.

I look forward to your informed well explained responses, Some of you guys are really on your shit, reminds me of one of my planted aquarium forums.
Watched and Bumped.
 
PiffinOut

PiffinOut

Note*Copy Pasta Edit of above due to time constraints.

I know i should "lurk more" before speakin but, why dont most of you use regular composted soil from your yard waste and home/kitchen scraps. I personally use a worm farm composter. All my kitchen waste (minus meat) goes in the farm. Not only that, occassionally I will mix in some choice leaf litter from the yard and garden scraps and tiny roots I can dig up with my rake from the trees near my yard compost pile. By using the worm bin, I get nutrient rich soil, and varios breeds of EWC, ALOT of it. If one was worried about fungus,bad bacteria, or seeds one could just put it on a low temp in the oven for a while and mix and water it it every now and then (keep a window open, the soil alone will make it smell quite... Earthy, dirty, woody). Or if baking isnt your pot of tea, why not boil it in a pot by your outside fire pit or on the kitchen stove. By boiling it you are not burning many nutrients in the process in comparison to baking it as most stoves start over 100C 212F *boiling point of water). Once it cools you can drain it strain it or just leave it in a rubbermaids or baking trays, whatever you can store it in safely out of the elements but not air tight.. Stir the mix occassionally, had your soil ammendments or other additions to the mix as you like. While thats happening you can also take all the left over nutrient rich boiled water and insteafd of wasting it, use the sterilized drained water as a base to help feed your current or future cultivations. After your soil/compost mix has dried it should be very fine but breathable. If its not, continue to get it wet, mix dry and mix again and check on it occasionally. Make sure to add some beneficial fungus, bacteri,a microbes, or general living soil/ biostarter. I use some sugar and beer and yeast and some white fungus I find by the maple trees by moving my yard compost that covers it and rakings its young roots that actually travel up to reach the compost rather than down deep into the soil. In any case. you could do one method or the other or both. I used to boil small amounts with cheeseclothe in a pot, now I bake it. I l earned this method from the "Walstad Method" for planted fish tanks back when I was just and aquatic plant guy. The theory for planted tanks using this method is that it speed mineralizes the soil mix to prevent uncontrolled algae breakouts due to spikes in nutrient levels and fluctuation in the water parameters that come from unmineralized soils. Its not so much for the bugs of the fungus or the seeds for planted tanks, as those things dont live in aquatic situations, but more so for the nutrient availability. I suppose for regular growers, those other benefits to heating you soil work.

Im not sure that any of that matters here, but in any case, I could only imagine most of you guys dont use regular soil and compost from home is because you like to fine tune things. The water by me is hard and the soil is mostly clay and sand. But I have a spot near my lawn compostings where the younger maples grow in the shade and anytime I need some decent mix in the spring or summer I can just go with a rake and loosen up some prime tiny rooted, leafy carbon and nutrient rich flufly soil full of beneficial white fungus that feed on the sugars. of the maple tree and leaf litter. I can use it as is as general compost mix soil or I can sift it and use the tiny little broken maple roots and black locust/oak/maple/grass compost as a seedling starter to substitute peat/coco coir in my vegetable garden. I have found that for me all sorts of compost both home found (eartworm castings from home food worm farm, yard compost pile, compost toilet)or found locally (maneur, chicken fish,horse, goat etc poop) and wood chips, bark, ash from the downed trees in the yard works well for my vegetables. My soil testing nutrient levels are off the charts following the principles I have followed from outdoor gardening via the Back to Eden method.
If liquid compost is your thing the worm farm steadlily produces dark compost juice at the bottom for me to easily access. Since the worm factory is layered the best soil sinks to the bottom as the worms go up and down. When I want to use a new batch of compost tea I use drawsting cheeseclothe pouches and fill it with the bottom bins nutrient and wormcasting rich compost. Then I put int a container and aerate it with yeast, sugar (preferrably molassas, a tiny bit of salt, some crumbed oak and maple tree leaves and some beneficial microbes,bacteria, and throw the pounches in a large pail full of either regular water, rain water, or old fish tank water. Depending how much or how little compost I want to use for tea, and many times depending who took my pail, I use a 5gal protein supplement jug .Regardless of the container, as long as it can fit the stone and the cheese clothes, you can fill it with water (or in my case, exotic fishtank waste water from a recent water change) and some aquarium airstones and a pump and get some great compost tea.Toss them in there to aerate for a few days just to be sure, but you can get away with the first or second day if you add in some beer (preferably guiness) with your sugar and yeast to speed up the process.


In any case, sorry to rant, but I dont understand what all the fuss is about unless you guys
a)dont have a yard or outdoor setup or garage area for compost bins
b)dont want to compost things yourself
c) cant trust that your compost/soil is free from insecticide/ other assorted icides and repellants.
or
d) really want to know exactly what is going in, and treat this more like a )controlled) science experiment.
Please explain if I am underthinking all this. I hope I didnt come off as coy I even give my house plants my left over old, fish tank water while doing quarterly water changes. My fish only eat worms I grow, dapnia and aquarium plants so I know the source cuz I am the source.

Idk, I have farmers on both sides of my family and thats how they always did things, use what you got around you was the way they lived, nutrients are everywhere if you know how to find them and use them,, from your local farm to starbucks to your fridges rotten salad greens or leftover egg shell or beer, even in your poop and pee from a compost toilet.

What are everyones thoughts, why dont you guys go totally locally sourced, why dont you do this for your bush of choice.

Also, if you guys could help me out in another thread, https://www.thcfarmer.com/threads/need-electric-help-4x4-arctic-alpine-12-with-12-cxm22-cobs.124501/ thatd be amazing. I dont mean to thread jack you guys.

I look forward to your informed well explained responses, Some of you guys are really on your shit, reminds me of one of my planted aquarium forums.
Watched and Bumped.
 
savagemonk

savagemonk

How is this working out for you? I am also in Canada.
Excellent for first time. I recently got Gaia’s super insect frass and Natures Nectar Terpene Plus.
Im on here to dial in the ratios in tbsp per gallon for my different nutrients.
On Youtube Mr. Canucks Grows says prefixing soil 50/50 blend 444 & 284 @ 3 tbsp/Gal for flower phase of photos and for starting autos. He also adds 25% worm castings.


How is this working out for you? I am also in Canada.
 
savagemonk

savagemonk

Im new here guys so cut me some slack. I know i should "lurk more" before speakin but. Why dont most of you use regular composted soil from your yard. waste and food scraps. I personally have a worm farm composter full of different worms. All my kitchen waste (minus meat) goes in the farm. So I get nutrient rich soil, and varios breeds EWC. If youre worried about fungus,bad bacteria or seeds you just put it on a low temp in the oven for a while and mix it every now and then (keep a window open). Or instead of that why not boil it in a pot by your fire pit or on the kitchen stove for a while. By boiling it you are not burning many nutrients in the process. You can use the left over water as a base to help feed your Then take it out after its been mineralized. You could do one method or the other or both. I used to boil small amounts with cheeseclothe it in a pot, now I bake it. Learned this method from the "Walstad Method" for planted fish tanks back when I was just and aquatic plant guy. The theory for planted tanks using this method is that it speed mineralizes the soil mix to prevent uncontrolled algae breakouts from uncontrolled nutrient availability in the water, its not so much for the bugs of the fungus or the seeds , as they dont live in aquatic situations more so for the nutrient availability.

Im not sure that any of that matters here, but in any case, I could only imagine most of you guys dont use regular soil and compost from home is because you like to fine tune things. The water by me is hard and the soil is mostly clay and sand. But I have a spot near my lawn compostings where the younger maples grow in the shade and anytime I need some decent mix in the spring or summer I can just go with a rake and loosen up some prime tiny rooted, leafy carbon and nutrient rich flufly soil full of beneficial white fungus that feed on the sugars. of the maple tree and leaf litter. I can use it as is as general compost mix soil or I can sift it and use the tiny little broken maple roots and black locust/oak/maple/grass compost as a seedling starter to substitute peat/coco coir in my vegetable garden. I have found that for me all sorts of compost both home found (eartworm castings from home food worm farm, yard compost pile, compost toilet)or found locally (maneur, chicken fish,horse, goat etc poop) and wood chips, bark, ash from the downed trees in the yard works amazing for my vegetables and my nutrient levels are off the charts following the principles Back to Eden method.
If liquid compost is your thing the worm farm steadlily produces dark compost juice at the bottom for me that to easily access. Since the worm factory is layered the best soil sinks to the bottom as the worms go up and down. When I want to use a new batch of compost tea I take cheeseclothe pouches and fill it with some bottom bin compost,yeast, sugar (preferrably molassas, a tiny bit of salt and some crumbed oak and maple tree leaves and some beneficial microbes,bacteria, and throw the pounches in a large pail full of either regular water, rain water, or old fish tank water. Depending how much or how little I want to use for tea, and depending who took the pail, I use a 5gal protein supplement jug.Then I take my old trusty fish tank air stones and toss them in there for a few days just to be sure, but you can get away with the first or second day if you add in some beer (preferably guiness) with your sugar and yeast to speed up the process.


In any case, sorry to rant, but I dont understand what all the fuss is about unless you guys
a)dont have a yard or outdoor setup or garage area for compost bins
b)dont want to compost things yourself
c) cant trust that your compost/soil is free from insecticides.
or
d) really want to know exactly what is going in, and treat this more like a )controlled) science experiment.
Please explain if I am underthinking all this. I hope I didnt come off as coy I even give my house plants my left over old, fish tank water while doing quarterly water changes. My fish only eat worms I grow, dapnia and aquarium plants so I know the source cuz I am the source.

Idk, I have farmers on both sides of my family and thats how they always did things, use what you got around you was the way they lived, nutrients are everywhere if you know how to find them and use them,, from your local farm to starbucks to your rotten salad greens and leftover egg shell, even in your poop and pee from a compost toilet.

What are everyones thoughts, why dont you guys go totally locally sourced, why dont you do this for your bush of choice

Also, if you guys could help me out in another thread, https://www.thcfarmer.com/threads/need-electric-help-4x4-arctic-alpine-12-with-12-cxm22-cobs.124501/ thatd be amazing. I dont mean to thread jack you guys.

I look forward to your informed well explained responses, Some of you guys are really on your shit, reminds me of one of my planted aquarium forums.
Watched and Bumped.
I just started a worm and composting bin this year. You can amend your soil; clayey soil needs gypsum and sandy soil needs green sand. Cannabis grows are big money and you risk bugs, larvae and viruses from using backyard soil.
 
shitwinds

shitwinds

what a great thread.........i am thinking of changing from hydro to organic soil in the next grows due to insane water usage and this thread is chock full o recipes......was debating just using fox farm ocean forrest for simplicity.....but, i have an anal streak, so i know where this is going......ill be making my own and there isnt a shortage of recipes here, thanks fellas
 
TheForechecker

TheForechecker

So, can anyone see a problem with this soil recipe? I was thinking about taking out the blood meal and bat guano, keep that stuff outdoors. Not sure of alternatives. Also not really sure how "bad" blood meal and bat guano are indoors, will have to do some more research.

I will mix and cook for a month.


I know this list is ridiculous, but it is what it is.


TheForecheckers internet induced paralysis by analysis mashup super soil mix attempt #1

Mostly Gaia Green amendments, Blue Organics Super soil, Fox Farm Ocean Forest

  • 3 gallons soil
  • 3 gallons coco
  • 3 gallons Worm Castings
  • 3 gallons Perlite
  • ¼ cup neem Cake (4-3-2)
  • ½ cup Azomite granular
  • 1.5 cups 4-4-4 All Purpose
  • ¼ Mineralized Phosphate Gaia Green (Bat Guano)
  • 1 cup - Bone Meal (0-14-0)
  • ¼ cup Fishbone meal (6-16-0)
  • ½ cup Kelp Meal (1-0-2)
  • 1 cup crushed oyster shell
  • ¾ cup Oyster Shell Flour
  • ½ cup - Green Sand (0-0-0.2)
  • ¼ cup Blood Meal (14-0-0)
  • 1 cup alfalfa meal
  • ½ heaping cup feather meal
  • ¼ cup Rock Phosphate
  • ¼ cup Basalt Rock Dust
  • ¼ cup Glacial Rock Dust
  • 2 cups diatomaceous earth
  • ¾ heaping cup – Gypsum
  • 1.5 cups Granular Humic Acid
  • ¼ cup Soft Rock Phosphate 0-3-0
  • ½ cup Langbeinite 0-0-22
 
savagemonk

savagemonk

So, can anyone see a problem with this soil recipe? I was thinking about taking out the blood meal and bat guano, keep that stuff outdoors. Not sure of alternatives. Also not really sure how "bad" blood meal and bat guano are indoors, will have to do some more research.

I will mix and cook for a month.


I know this list is ridiculous, but it is what it is.


TheForecheckers internet induced paralysis by analysis mashup super soil mix attempt #1

Mostly Gaia Green amendments, Blue Organics Super soil, Fox Farm Ocean Forest

  • 3 gallons soil
  • 3 gallons coco
  • 3 gallons Worm Castings
  • 3 gallons Perlite
  • ¼ cup neem Cake (4-3-2)
  • ½ cup Azomite granular
  • 1.5 cups 4-4-4 All Purpose
  • ¼ Mineralized Phosphate Gaia Green (Bat Guano)
  • 1 cup - Bone Meal (0-14-0)
  • ¼ cup Fishbone meal (6-16-0)
  • ½ cup Kelp Meal (1-0-2)
  • 1 cup crushed oyster shell
  • ¾ cup Oyster Shell Flour
  • ½ cup - Green Sand (0-0-0.2)
  • ¼ cup Blood Meal (14-0-0)
  • 1 cup alfalfa meal
  • ½ heaping cup feather meal
  • ¼ cup Rock Phosphate
  • ¼ cup Basalt Rock Dust
  • ¼ cup Glacial Rock Dust
  • 2 cups diatomaceous earth
  • ¾ heaping cup – Gypsum
  • 1.5 cups Granular Humic Acid
  • ¼ cup Soft Rock Phosphate 0-3-0
  • ½ cup Langbeinite 0-0-22
Are you considering Gaia’s suggested doses on their package direction? You can email them and ask if this many nutrients is okay, beneficial or detrimental. I’m surprised you didn’t add Gaia’s superfly insect frass. Not sure about the Langbeinite, might give a potassium burn.
Are you using fabric pots with saucers?...Wouldn’t want to lose your nutes to runoff.
 
savagemonk

savagemonk

So, can anyone see a problem with this soil recipe? I was thinking about taking out the blood meal and bat guano, keep that stuff outdoors. Not sure of alternatives. Also not really sure how "bad" blood meal and bat guano are indoors, will have to do some more research.

I will mix and cook for a month.


I know this list is ridiculous, but it is what it is.


TheForecheckers internet induced paralysis by analysis mashup super soil mix attempt #1

Mostly Gaia Green amendments, Blue Organics Super soil, Fox Farm Ocean Forest

  • 3 gallons soil
  • 3 gallons coco
  • 3 gallons Worm Castings
  • 3 gallons Perlite
  • ¼ cup neem Cake (4-3-2)
  • ½ cup Azomite granular
  • 1.5 cups 4-4-4 All Purpose
  • ¼ Mineralized Phosphate Gaia Green (Bat Guano)
  • 1 cup - Bone Meal (0-14-0)
  • ¼ cup Fishbone meal (6-16-0)
  • ½ cup Kelp Meal (1-0-2)
  • 1 cup crushed oyster shell
  • ¾ cup Oyster Shell Flour
  • ½ cup - Green Sand (0-0-0.2)
  • ¼ cup Blood Meal (14-0-0)
  • 1 cup alfalfa meal
  • ½ heaping cup feather meal
  • ¼ cup Rock Phosphate
  • ¼ cup Basalt Rock Dust
  • ¼ cup Glacial Rock Dust
  • 2 cups diatomaceous earth
  • ¾ heaping cup – Gypsum
  • 1.5 cups Granular Humic Acid
  • ¼ cup Soft Rock Phosphate 0-3-0
  • ½ cup Langbeinite 0-0-22
Are you considering Gaia’s suggested doses on their package direction? You can email them and ask if this many nutrients is okay, beneficial or detrimental. I’m surprised you didn’t add Gaia’s superfly insect frass. Not sure about the Langbeinite, might give a potassium burn.
Are you using fabric pots with saucers?...Wouldn’t want to lose your nutes to runoff.
So, can anyone see a problem with this soil recipe? I was thinking about taking out the blood meal and bat guano, keep that stuff outdoors. Not sure of alternatives. Also not really sure how "bad" blood meal and bat guano are indoors, will have to do some more research.

I will mix and cook for a month.


I know this list is ridiculous, but it is what it is.


TheForecheckers internet induced paralysis by analysis mashup super soil mix attempt #1

Mostly Gaia Green amendments, Blue Organics Super soil, Fox Farm Ocean Forest

  • 3 gallons soil
  • 3 gallons coco
  • 3 gallons Worm Castings
  • 3 gallons Perlite
  • ¼ cup neem Cake (4-3-2)
  • ½ cup Azomite granular
  • 1.5 cups 4-4-4 All Purpose
  • ¼ Mineralized Phosphate Gaia Green (Bat Guano)
  • 1 cup - Bone Meal (0-14-0)
  • ¼ cup Fishbone meal (6-16-0)
  • ½ cup Kelp Meal (1-0-2)
  • 1 cup crushed oyster shell
  • ¾ cup Oyster Shell Flour
  • ½ cup - Green Sand (0-0-0.2)
  • ¼ cup Blood Meal (14-0-0)
  • 1 cup alfalfa meal
  • ½ heaping cup feather meal
  • ¼ cup Rock Phosphate
  • ¼ cup Basalt Rock Dust
  • ¼ cup Glacial Rock Dust
  • 2 cups diatomaceous earth
  • ¾ heaping cup – Gypsum
  • 1.5 cups Granular Humic Acid
  • ¼ cup Soft Rock Phosphate 0-3-0
  • ½ cup Langbeinite 0-0-22
Also if you like growing with Gaia buy bulk, the 10 or 20 kg paper bags.
 
TheForechecker

TheForechecker

Also if you like growing with Gaia buy bulk, the 10 or 20 kg paper bags.
Good point. I must admit, I bought the smaller packages to try first and for the containers as I find them more manageable and less dusty than the 10kg paper bags (which I bought for 444 and bloom).

I didn't follow the Gaia Green reqs, im roughly following the REVs living soil recipe and tried to match ingredients I exchanged at same micronutrient and npk levels. I have no knowledge of release times, so I'm kinda going on faith and trust from the internet...we know that always ends well! lol

I still am having problems wrapping my head around adding 1 to 4 tablespoons per gallon of all these minerals and nutrients. It just seems like so much. 😄

Anyway, so you think im close to on point with my TOTAL recipe amounts or should I be mixing all of the dry amendments, then blending THAT at 3 tablespoons per gallon?
 
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