Sugars for flowering what everyone using

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IrishRob

IrishRob

I have read and spoken to people that have told me for flower I'm going to need sugars. What kinds of sugars are the rest of the farm using?
 
RippedTorn

RippedTorn

Plants don't absorb sugars like that. They produce the sugars they need via photosynthesis.
Using molasses alone can help your soil microbiome and add micronutrients, but it can also cause an outbreak of detrimental microorganisms.
Pot forum nonsense. Roots absorb monosaccharides in very predictable ratios.

What are kids doing for science experiments these days? How to get more views on Tiktok by pretending to be a girl? It takes a 6th grade education but you can measure the ppm of sugar water vs transpiration rate real simple. Put a gram of sugar in, should be a gram of sugar left when the waters gone right?


Stop gmoing your plants everyone. Brew a drinkable LAB, taste it. When all the sweet is gone it's ready. No gmoing your root zone or artificially sweetening your buds.
 
beluga

beluga

Roots absorb monosaccharides in very predictable ratios.
Reabsorb. From sugars produced during their own photosynthesizing.
Plant roots are able to absorb sugars from the rhizosphere but also release sugars and other metabolites that are critical for growth and environmental signaling. Reabsorption of released sugar molecules could help reduce the loss of photosynthetically fixed carbon through the roots. Although biochemical analyses have revealed monosaccharide uptake mechanisms in roots, the transporters that are involved in this process have not yet been fully characterized
Therefore, we hypothesize that STP13 reabsorbs monosaccharides that leak from damaged root epidermal cells to increase the cellular osmotic pressure or to reduce the loss of nutrients for the adaptation against conditions of osmotic stress.
referenced from https://sci-hub.do/10.1074/jbc.M111.269712
 
beluga

beluga

Consumer article from Safer
Plants produce their own sugars through photosynthesis and use it as fuel for cell growth and development. Sugar is also secreted through the roots to activate microbes that help break down nutrients and make them easier for plants to take up. Adding sugar, in the form of molasses, to the feeding program for your indoor garden sets the beneficial microbes on a feeding frenzy, which leads to a dramatic increase in their population.


The key minerals that make molasses a healthy food for people are vital for plants, too. Potassium and calcium, in particular, play an essential role in the processes that plants go through as they form buds and flowers. Even better, the sugar works as a natural "chelating" agent, binding it to other nutrients so they are more readily absorbed by plants.


As plants mature and prepare to bloom, their need for carbohydrates outpaces their capacity to produce them. Molasses is useful to plants throughout their life cycle, but it is most valuable at the transition from the vegetative stage to the peak of bloom time, when the need for sugars peaks. The extra carbohydrates in molasses give plants a boost that helps them flower more abundantly than if they relied solely on self-made sugar
 
beluga

beluga

There's a bunch of inexact "scientific" articles from <1990 that will lead a lot of people to believe that feeding plants directly with glucose, sucrose, etc. will show them take it up and, consequently, take up nitrogen and other vital nutrients more effectively.
They aren't wrong, but they were wrong in that they didn't recognize the actual mechanism of action - what the plants actually use the sugars for and how the microbes and the enzymes those microbes produce directly impact plant function.

Plants also absorb food coloring through their roots. What significance should we designate for that?

I'm not an expert, so certainly don't take my word for it. But I'll be happy to link as much research as to numb your brain.

edit: It should also be noted that much of this is still in hypothesis. Whether or not the plants actually use added sugar that they can absorb for functions other than those of symbiosis is on the table.
 
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MIMedGrower

MIMedGrower

There's a bunch of inexact "scientific" articles from <1990 that will lead a lot of people to believe that feeding plants directly with glucose, sucrose, etc. will show them take it up and, consequently, take up nitrogen and other vital nutrients more effectively.
They aren't wrong, but they were wrong in that they didn't recognize the actual mechanism of action - what the plants actually use the sugars for and how the microbes and the enzymes those microbes produce directly impact plant function.

Plants also absorb food coloring through their roots. What significance should we designate for that?

I'm not an expert, so certainly don't take my word for it. But I'll be happy to link as much research as to numb your brain.

edit: It should also be noted that much of this is still in hypothesis. Whether or not the plants actually use added sugar that they can absorb for functions other than those of symbiosis is on the table.

i thought sugar has to be processed to pass through the root membrane as sucrose molecules are too big. The plant gets no sugar from mollasses and stuff in the soil?
 
beluga

beluga

i thought sugar has to be processed to pass through the root membrane as sucrose molecules are too big. The plant gets no sugar from mollasses and stuff in the soil?
As far as I've been reading, most modern studies indicate that they can absorb monosaccharides via roots, but do not uptake them into their other structures via that method and instead use them to interact with their rhizosphere for various purposes.

I have to do some digging through my history to see what was said about sucrose...

edit: I also misspoke in my initial post here with saying 'absorb'.
Uptake is the accurate term.

My semantic dissonance gets pretty bad when I'm reading about STPs and shit like that...
 
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tomatoesarecooltoo

tomatoesarecooltoo

Personally I only use sugar in teas, minimally just so the microbes don't starve, but I don't attract ants. I use whatever natural sugars I have around, usually whatever juice I have in the fridge.

finishing products like botanicare sweet are mostly magnesium sulfate. But they do have ionic size sugars.
This makes me want to try using invert sugar syrup.
 
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