Do you think it is necessary to add UV chips to the LED grow light?


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MarsHydroLED

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Hi farmers, please kindly do us a favor, your vote!

As you know we have 2 new lines lights, the Mars Hydro TS and SP, which the LEDs we have been to promote here, I just confirmed that Mars Hydro SP250 has UV lights. So we are collecting data and might do some improvements to our other lights. Do you think it will be necessary to add UV lights to our TS series as well? Please feel free to vote, thank you in advance.
SP250 IR UV.png
 

Aqua Man

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Depends on the light source you are using to start with. There is plenty of scientific data to show a benefit in trichome production not bud size. While there is some great info and studies out there I think the optimal intensity, duration and combination of UVB/UVA has yet to be determined.
 

Aqua Man

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even if this were so and maybe it is, how would you handle the length of time when UV/UVC rays start to damage the plant?
There quite a bit of data on this and I think it was first observed in like the 70's I wanna say but that could be 20 yrs off. UVB seem to be the most important UV. Studies show Combination of UVA and UVB to be best. You don't want any UVC that will kill plants in minutes if not seconds.
 

MarsHydroLED

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Depends on the light source you are using to start with. There is plenty of scientific data to show a benefit in trichome production not bud size. While there is some great info and studies out there I think the optimal intensity, duration and combination of UVB/UVA has yet to be determined.
even if this were so and maybe it is, how would you handle the length of time when UV/UVC rays start to damage the plant?
I believe that most growers more care about the tightness of the buds, quality and the smell compared to the buds' size. But why not UVA? Some companies now in the market mainly add the UVA, not the UVB. And ozark right, the UVC can kill living cells, damage the plant. For outdoor the UVC actually y filtered out by earth's atmosphere, it's not the component of natural sunlight
 

Aqua Man

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Infact the reptisun 5.0 shows is close to the same spectrum that has show these 20-30% increases. The timing is crucial also. You can do harm to the plants...timer mishap and you WILL have dead plants with those. There is a lot of info out there I'm just not all up tonspead on it.
 

1diesel1

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Plants use sunlight for photosynthesis and are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation that is present in sunlight. UV radiation is divided into 3 classes: UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C. The Ultraviolet-C (UV-C) region of the UV spectrum includes wavelengths below 280 nm; these highly energetic wavelengths are absorbed by ozone and are not present in the sunlight at the earth's surface. Under normal growing conditions, effects of UV-C light are not seen on plants. This research examined the effects of the application of ultraviolet-C irradiation (UV-C) on greenhouse ornamental plants and demonstrated very promising uses of UV-C as a treatment to increase branching and reduce the height of plants, and in some situations, affect the rate of flowering. Several conclusions have been made from this research that are consistent with multiple plant species. First, the amount of UV-C light that a greenhouse plant receives is critical to its response. The proper weekly dosage, for as little at 15 min a week, will control a plant's growth response. In addition, too high a dosage of UV-C irradiation will burn plants and too low will have no effect. Second, proper applications of UV-C light decreases final plant height. Several plant species have responded to applications of UV-C light by growing shorter than the control plants that receive normal greenhouse lighting. Third, UV-C light increases branching of greenhouse plants. At appropriate dosage rates, UV-C light increases branching on some species and increases the number of flowers that are produced. This avoids the need to pinch plants and to apply plant growth regulators. Fourth, the application of UV-C light can affect flowering time. The application of UV-C irradiation can either delay flowering or cause earlier flowering depending on plant species and dosage rate. In some cases, the increased branching is accompanied by delayed flowering.
 
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I believe that most growers more care about the tightness of the buds, quality and the smell compared to the buds' size. But why not UVA? Some companies now in the market mainly add the UVA, not the UVB. And ozark right, the UVC can kill living cells, damage the plant. For outdoor the UVC actually y filtered out by earth's atmosphere, it's not the component of natural sunlight
i would assume the amount is safe for our purposes, and doesn't constitute a significant cost to either the manufacturer which is in turn passed onto the buyer . will the UV lights be controlled by a switch for the flower cycle?
 

Aqua Man

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Some links I have read on it. If ya want. There are tons.


I found this one to be a really good up to date info on lighting.
 
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