worthwhile making landrace seeds?

  • Thread starter budboy299
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Grow Up

Grow Up

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Do you have more specific provenance info on these seeds? I mean, obviously you have country of origin, but do you have the towns they were collected from, or altitude, growing conditions..other plants species they were growing in association with.. that kind of thing?
 
budboy299

budboy299

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Little plants (5 of them) are very slow off the gate but have their second set of leaves now and are starting to look healthier. So far they are just outdoors for another month and I can take some cuttings of each. Then once the cuttings are roots they will go into bud. Doing this with virtually no veg time on the clones as sativas can be notoriously slow to finish. Hopefully I get both male and female and they can to their mating dance so they can pass on their lineage to other landrace loving folks
 
budboy299

budboy299

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So far I've just germed the Peruvian ones. 5 hatched and are looking strong out of about 20 seeds. Hopefully some of both genders so the lovemakin' can begin. The gal that got them for me is currently in Lebanon so hopefully she will bring me more goodies. Sadly though she will be there for almost a year before she is home again :( Ironically at this point I have no real interest in the landraces but still these seem to rare to let go extinct. This is the main reason I am making seeds. This way I can pass around the genetics and they can live on.
They will be outside gathering strength for another few weeks and then I will take cuttings of each one, bring them indoors and let them get it on!
 
budboy299

budboy299

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Just was out in the garden and noticed that the leaves are pretty damn fat for a sativa. Could it just be a fat leaved sativa? Or do indicas come from Peru as well? Wish I knew more about the regions of the world and what is local to them
 
Grow Up

Grow Up

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You could always just send them to a fellow farmer with the space and time to grow out and distribute. Let's you be the good samaritan but saves you the effort. That's what I'd be doing if I were in your position.
 
Seamaiden

Seamaiden

Living dead girl
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Just was out in the garden and noticed that the leaves are pretty damn fat for a sativa. Could it just be a fat leaved sativa? Or do indicas come from Peru as well? Wish I knew more about the regions of the world and what is local to them
I honestly don't know, I've never spent that much time reading on the subject, just toking. :o
 
SunGrown

SunGrown

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Just was out in the garden and noticed that the leaves are pretty damn fat for a sativa. Could it just be a fat leaved sativa? Or do indicas come from Peru as well? Wish I knew more about the regions of the world and what is local to them
Depends on the farmers they came from there. Even the mexican growers now use hybrid stock to produce better quality.
 
Goodsen Cranium

Goodsen Cranium

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I'm keeping my eye out... Interested in seeing what develops for you. I was gifted 5 Jamaican landrace seeds. Fattest beans I've ever seen. So curious about them, but don't want to start them with the space I'm working in now.

Good luck, budboy!
LG
 
suomynona

suomynona

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@budboy299
Just wanted to give a little update. One of the ecuador seeds grew but didnt get more than an inch or so tall then just pooped out. I tried bro. The tardawg f2's i am selecting a male or two from now and they are doing great. Havent popped the others yet. Anyway, hope all is swell in your world!
 
primordial

primordial

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Depends on the farmers they came from there. Even the mexican growers now use hybrid stock to produce better quality.
About what years was this genetics shift? I have bag seed from 90's and I'm praying that genetic shift was after the 90's. Im hoping to have preserved the sativa side of my mexi-landrace.
 
shemshemet

shemshemet

623
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If you truly want to preserve the genetics, yes open pollinate them.

If you want to preserve the genetics, AND start making some crosses of your own, open-control pollination would be to your favor. By open-control pollination, I mean make every cross possible and label each cross. ie: two males (A & B) and three females (C, D, &E) will give you six different crosses = AC, AD, AE, BC, BD, BE.

Now your next step is much simpler, you can start to get an idea for what traits your plants will breed true for, etc. AND you haven't lost any genetic variety.

Your drawbacks are time, space, extremely careful pollination and coordination. (but who doesn't enjoy honest hard work?)
 

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