2nd Interesting Set-up...

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sog1313

sog1313

Hey Patriot,
Your grow looks amazing. I am also doing a CFL grow, running about 250W on 4 plants. How often do you feed in flower, and how is your bud formation? loose or dense? The reason Im asking is because my plants are about 2 weeks into flower and only one is showing any considerable formations. peace.
 
Patriot

Patriot

Hey man, welcome to my grow lol.
I have 4 45watts for 1 plant. I had two 45 per plants but the other one decided to go to the male side...i killed it after i took some pollen off him.
Anyways man, I feed my plant once aevery week or week and 1/2. I am feeding it some Wano from Peruvian sea birds...about 2 teaspoons per 1/2 gallon...aproximatly. My bud formation looks nice and dense my friend...but that could be all genetics. I have my main 6 colas up to the light almost...the all look very dense...getting denser by the day. look at the pics from before and after....u ll see what i mean.
2 weeks its too early i think. I will wait till another two weeks but as i said it could be genetics. Mine, since the day it flowered (look at pics) it looked like the plant had a small white-yelowish afro. .lol
I hope this helped i tried to answer ur questions...My plant is now, into her 4th week of flowering....another 5 weeks or so and she ll be dead...drying out lol
Also check the temperature and humedity ....mine seem to ove it when it is around 80 or 85 F and between 55 % and 65% humedity....
Take care man, and keep stoping by...i ll post at least one a week....take care and good luck
 
sog1313

sog1313

Ah, that explains the good growth. I only have 2 bulbs per plant, so they are slower and looser. temps are around the same, high 70s low 80s, humidity around 60%. Ive recently switched to fossilized seabird guano and molasses, hopefully that will help. im trying to be patient but you know how it is when you see those sweet, stinky buds form up... thanks for the info brother. good growing!
 
Patriot

Patriot

cool. They will gor more, getting as close as u can to the bulbs...if u can put ur finger next to it and stand the heat so can the plant. I will wait for the molases until the last 2 weeks....personaly
take care man
 
justanotherbozo

justanotherbozo

cool. They will gor more, getting as close as u can to the bulbs...if u can put ur finger next to it and stand the heat so can the plant. I will wait for the molases until the last 2 weeks....personaly
take care man

here's some info to show that molasses can, and should,
be used throughout flowering.

anyway, i provide the info so you can decide what to do,
for you.


Why Use Sugary Supplements?
Matt LeBannister

People feed their plants sugars all the time without knowing it and not always understanding why. You give your sweetheart a bouquet of roses for Valentine’s Day and before they are put into the vase, sugar is added to the water to extend their bloom. Some “old school” gardeners will add molasses to their nutrient solution during the flowering period. Actually, just by adding fulvic acid, usually labeled “gold,” and humic acid, usually labeled “black,” to your nutrient mix you are giving your plants the building blocks for sugars.

Most growers do not even know that there is a meter, called a Brix meter, that is used to measure the level of sugars in the leaves of plants. It is generally understood that the higher the level of sugars within a plant’s tissue, the healthier the plant is and the better the yield will be.

Knowing this, the question should not be, “Why add a carbohydrate supplement to my nutrient solution?” but simply, “Why haven’t I added one already?”

To understand why you should give your plants one of the sugary supplements on the market, you should become a little more familiar with the way plants produce and use sugars.

Almost all plants use sugars as their main source of fuel. They transport these sugars along with water and other elements throughout their systems, either for food or to create amino acids for biosynthesis to fuel cellular respiration. Maple trees are a great example of how plants use sugars. Their sugary sap is famous at breakfast tables worldwide, but that sap is really the food the maple tree has begun to store to survive the winter to come.

Most plants are photoautotrophs, which means that they synthesize their own food directly from inorganic compounds using photons, the energy from light. They do this using a process called photosynthesis. Photosynthesis comes from the Greek word “photo,” meaning light, and “synthesis,” meaning to put together. The inorganic compounds are carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O), and the energy source is sunlight. The end products include glucose, a simple sugar, and oxygen (O2). The actual equation looks like this:

6CO2 + 12H2O + photons —> C6H2O6 + 6O2 + 6H2O
(gas) (liquid) (aqueous) (gas) (liquid)


Then, through a process called carbon fixation, ATP (adenosine triphosphate),AND? a high-energy molecule CO2 (carbon dioxide) are used to create sugars. Some sugars produced, such as glucose, are simple sugars or monosaccharides. They are easily broken down by the plant and are generally used for energy. Other sugars produced, such as cellulose, are complex sugars or polysaccharides. Polysaccharides consist of a chain of two or more sugars and are usually used for lipid and amino acid biosynthesis. Polysaccharides are also used as a fuel in cellular respiration. Cellulose specifically is used as the building material for all green plants. It is the main component of all green plant cell walls.

Through the examination of the process of photosynthesis, we learn just how important the sugars produced through this process are. The sugars and starches are vital to the plant. They are essential for cellular preparation, to maintain the plants metabolism and vigor. The sugars are even the building blocks that keep the very cells of the plant together. Now it is understood that plants have a great big “sweet tooth” and are specialists at making the sugars they need.

So why then should we be feeding them more on top of all this? Simply put, flowering plants are burning these carbs trying to make large fruit or vegetables, or big beautiful blooms, faster than a marathon runner trying to win a race. Not to mention that the process of photosynthesis, which produces the sugars, itself takes a lot of energy. By adding one of the organic carbohydrate supplements to your nutrient solution the carbohydrates that have been allocated to the flowering process will be replenished more easily. This will save your plant the energy it would need to create those sugars itself, and your plant can focus more of its energy on the flowering process.

Also, many beneficial bacteria and fungi (aka carbon-fixing bacterial fungi) will live on the sugars and will break down the sugars for the plant. This, again, allows the plant to use energy usually spent breaking down sugars for other processes. The more beneficial bacteria and fungi, the easier nutrients are absorbed by the roots. All this leads to improved flowering and overall health of the plants.

When choosing the supplement for your plants remember the old saying, “You are what you eat.” The same goes for your plants. Look for something organic because organic sugars will improve flavor and smell better than anything that inorganic.

There are also some sugars that are more important to your plants than others. Xylose and arabinose are two of those sugars. Both are sugars naturally produced by plants. They are also monosaccharides, which means they are simple sugars and, therefore, used more easily by the plant.

Glucose should be the main ingredient of the product because it is the main product of photosynthesis. Glucose is a monosaccharide that is used for energy and for starting cellular respiration in the plant. The name “glucose” comes from the Greek word “glykys,” which means sweet, with the suffix “ose,” which denotes that it is a carbohydrate. Glucose is critical in the production of proteins and in lipid metabolism. Glucose is also used as a precursor for the synthesis of several important substances, such as starch and cellulose. Starch is a way in which plants store energy and cellulose makes up most of the structural parts of plants.

Fructose is also a monosaccharide and is a main component of most tree fruit, berries, and melons. It is the sweetest naturally occurring sugar and is twice as sweet as the disaccharide sucrose, which consists of glucose and fructose bonded together.

The disaccharide maltose is also an important sugar because enzymes break it down into two glucose molecules.

All of the above sugars are produced naturally by plants. By adding a supplement containing these simple and complex sugars to a well-balanced nutrient, a plant will increase the levels of sugars in the leaves and throughout the plant. This will let the plant use its energy more efficiently, allowing more energy to be focused on producing large fruit and bigger blooms. These sugars will also improve the taste of the end product while giving fuel to beneficial bacteria and fungi.
 
sog1313

sog1313

thanks for the info bozo! would it also stand to reason to feed the plants molasses even during veg? since they use the sugar to make cellulose, the more the merrier right? oh btw i bought some parts to refurb an HPS ballast, so in a few days im gonna be running a 400W HPS with the CFLs as supplemental. im sure theyre gonna love that.
good growing.
SOG
 
Patriot

Patriot

YEa Thanks Bozo...always landing a hand...cant complain about people like you...thanks
Well now that we know moreabout the matter...lets takethe plants to the couinty fair for some sugar candy ..maybe some candies apples ....lol ...lil... just kidding
But i will be adding some Rabbit liquid to my baby..thanks Bozo and thanks Sog1313
 
Patriot

Patriot

thanx Sun...glad to see you are ok....
Yeah i cant wait for another month...they look nice and tight Sun....weeeeeeeeeeeeee
that was my Warrior Scream!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
 
Patriot

Patriot

thats correct my friend...lol...its going to be sooo good..
did I tell u what i did with Dingleberry...i took some pollen and rubbed it into a flower and it has formed seeds, or i think they are seeds...i am excited about that man....i ll have around 5 seeds or so lol...its a start
 
Patriot

Patriot

Purple Time!!!

Here are some nice pics so you can see the color better...They are looking bigger and prettier by the day...simply more purple
 
Patriot

Patriot

She smells good...sweet like blueberries with a hint of flowers...very nice.
here are some more pics...just so u can see her dimentions...I am proud of her, she was very easy to gro, and loves everything, if she doesnt like something u ll know in a spend of 10 min or so...amazing lady, truely amazing. Oh and for the record She is on her 6th week tomorrow...so only 3 to go

what ever happened to ur backwards seedsling ?
 
im about to flip a room 12/12.ive got a couple that ive been moving in & out of a dark room for 12 houres of its light cycle.they will be a month ahead of the rest.
 
Patriot

Patriot

nice feel free to post some pictures.....i was checking the seeds yersterday and they are almost out of the sacs. Also, my whole plant tumble ...i was trying to take out to the bathroom so i could give her a nice flush and she decided that she didnt want to stay up stright no more, so she roll over on her side, so i am keeping her like this until choping time, 2 weelks from now....
 
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