A detailed explanation of why fast curing buds in preferable to slow curing.

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DragonKilla

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That makes sense, as in theory less THC will have been converted to CBN. Ideally - and I doubt anyone is going to do this - multiple samples from the same batch which have been cured both ways would be lab tested to see what the numbers tell us. Actually that would be awesome if someone did that. Would giving readings on levels of all the majors volatiles and cannabinoids.
 
way2green

way2green

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I spent years fighting humidity letting my nugs go 10- 14 days. Fighting mold and shit just got old. I can now use a dehu and a/c and get my product ready in 4 days. Sometimes it might take 5. I just can't tell a big difference.
 
0tt0

0tt0

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Organicyumyum I have almost 3 years growing experience, which I guess isn’t that much compared to you, but its enough to know what I’m doing now. I’ve not so sure on the flushing as I’m not a plant biologist, but I do have a background in chem, he’s on the money with fast curing. Admittedly I did call him out as total crap at first because there isn’t a single reference and I didn’t like his write up. And I won’t be 100% sure until I’ve tried it doing this but as I already said in my I other reply I did spend some serious hours online scrutinizing all the jargon in his blurb and I had to backflip, its does all check out. He’s hasn't tried to spread misinformation I have to say he's done the compete opposite. I will look for some of the papers I read.
 
Supercharge

Supercharge

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I'd been staying out of this thread after I saw what a shit fight it was turning into. I don't care to engage in mudslinging matches with people on the internet and I'm sure many others feel the same way. Glad it's been moderated now.

FWIW I cure in a similar fashion to the OP. I don't quite go to the same extreme, eg. sealing a room completely, but I do fast cure in a few days and allow the ambient humidity to bring buds to an optimal moisture %. There is no loss of smell and it doesn't smoke worse than anything else. My logic comes from the same underlying science. I've researched a great deal into oxidative processes, biochemistry, as well as various facets of plant biology. I love the shit, will sponge it up at any given chance! The science the OP has described is accurate IMO. I honestly don't understand how people end up with buds that smell and smoke like hay, but if you stick them in an oven that would probably happen.

I won't go as far to suggest everyone else adopts this method, do whatever you want and whatever works for you. Personally I couldn't care if people want to mes around curing buds for a month or more. Growing it a constant process of optimization and refinement for me and that includes the final steps of harvesting and curing. Growing if the fun part, harvesting and curing is not. Finding a method that has both saved me time and resulted in buds of at least equal quality to what they were when I slow cured has been a boon. Theoretically they should actually be of higher quality due to the decrease in oxidative damage, but I'm not a lab so couldn't tell you percentages.

If you do it right, a fast cure is fine. A number of people have indicated they fast cure with good results, so it's clearly not BS. Everyone is entitled to their own opinions which are colored by their own experiences, but to paint something as BS because of that it poor form IMO.
 
caregiverken

caregiverken

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The way I read the OP, he takes all the moisture out..less than a few % i think he said

You would think, after 6000 years of growing and smoking cannabis,
We would have this all this shit figured out by now. :confused:
Was that tolling?
 
way2green

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Nope. Not trolling but a vivid recap of the article. See that is what got the entire thread interesting. Everyone had a different perception of crumbly. Does it mean crumbly like shake or does it mean just the very tips of sweet leaves? Rehydrating also carries different interpretations depending on how dry the nugs are.
Are we rehydrating to the weed is spongy? Are we rehydrating just to stop the weed from crumbling? I still not sure about any of it.....
 
caregiverken

caregiverken

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You want 80% of the moisture gone in 48 hours. The remaining 20% will take another 24-48 hours. At this point the buds will be very brittle, and will crumble to the touch. To rehydrate, expose them to ambient humidity. Depending on what your RH is, this can take anyehere from 4-48 hours to achieve.

If my math is correct..there is 0% moisture in the buds before he rehydrates them

o_O
 
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way2green

way2green

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How can u rehydrate crumbly weed in 4 hours without putting water directly on it? I may be wrong but that has to effect the quality. I said this last year when this thread started. Rehydrated potatoes are not as good as fresh homemade mashed potatoes.
Ask any military guy about eating dehydrated meals when they are out in the field.
 
K

kolah

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I am trying to keep this light...and kind. So.....

Can anyone guess at a method that would prove which way is best ....or if both ways are equal? I have a very simple solution. :) Thoughts, ideas? ;)
 
midwestdensies

midwestdensies

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To think all I was trying to do was point out some logical fallacies of growing techniques. Never thought it would stir up such a fuss….for the record, my thesis had absolutely nothing to do with growing or smoking weed (but certainly helped me get through it LOL). I now regret I even mentioned it. I’m not pretending to be some high flying professor or a walking text book. If you would care to re-read what I wrote carefully, I made the point because it took me half my life to figure out I should be critically analyzing things - esp. my own confirmation biases and esp. in relation to my growing practices, i.e. “hey shit…maybe I should start questioning the doctrine because this and that don’t stack up”. Just because everyone else does it doesn’t mean it’s the best way to do it. I slow cured for years and it was a long time before I questioned whether it actually made any sense at all. I decided to try fast curing after reading up and talking to others who do it. After getting the technique down I’ve never looked back. To be clear on this - not one person has ever commented the weed I grow tastes harsh, bad or tastes like ‘chemicals’ (ironically I’ve had one person assuming it was organic, and others have asked. So what do you think that says to me?), it doesn’t smell like ‘hay’ (WTF?!), and the returning moisture content equals that of slow cured by the time it gets to the customer. If fast curing hadn’t been an improvement I’d have simply gone back to the old slow cure method, which is an easier and cheaper alternative because it doesn't require an intensive drying set up with all the associated hardware.

So that’s been my own personal experience. But rather than just rabbit on about that, what I posted was an attempt to provide a reasonably comprehendible explanation of why I believe it’s better to fast cure. I really tried to keep it objective and factual as possible. I have also provided what I believe is a very plausible explanation that accounts for the popular misnomer that fast cured weed supposedly always tastes harsher than slow cured - heat. And this is easily ameliorated via simple atmospheric rehydration, irrespective if the weed has been slow or dry cured. If someone would like to pick holes in that explanation, or question any other particular point, or think my understanding of the relevant biochemistry is shoddy or rudimentary, then please point out where and provide some logical reasoning to support your point of view. I like to engage in the type of dialogue that’s conducive to a productive and informative discussion where I am able to learn something valuable too. Unfortunately all some of you have been able to do so far is ‘critique’ my spelling or grammar in a schoolyard attempt to discredit my post. Well that makes an obvious statement…..and I doubt I’m the only one who sees that. But hey.

Really there’s just no need for disparaging (and honestly disappointing) personal attacks just because you don’t agree with something that challenges your own personal beliefs. And FYI I thought my use of the word ‘stipulate’ was entirely contextually appropriate, but I have no issues with admitting I’m wrong about something, I often am - don’t worry, my kids tell me so all the time.

@Organicyumyum, I read this thread yesterday, before your others posted were deleted (obviously they were of little worth). I never once claimed I was a scientist, just because I did a thesis does not make me one. I haven’t spread misinformation - that’s just not true. You’re right, we have absolutely no idea who you are. But I’m happy to give you the benefit of the doubt; you’re a ‘man of science’ with ’14 years of growing experience’, and clearly very opinionated on some philosophical topics too. Nice mix. That’s fine. I have more than a few years growing experience on you my friend. I also think you are wrong. In that thread I posed several questions relating to plant physiology and the redundancy of flushing. Perhaps you could help elucidate why flushing is necessary then, rather than just your personal opinion backed by 14 years of growing….Can I request you just stick to the facts, specifically I’m interested in the supposed mechanisms at play - what is happening at the molecular level. Seriously it’d be great if you could share some of your knowledge on this - to prevent the spread of misinformation of course ;)

I also don’t appreciate being accused of cutting corners for profit. That’s not true either. I’m extremely passionate about growing and have been since I was a kid, and take great pride in what I produce - so kindly mince your words. You clearly have NOT done both drying methods, at least not like I have. Well I DO have the experience of doing both, and both for many years, so I am in a position where I can make a very clear objective assessment of all the pros and cons. In a nutshell, when you put the effort into fast curing buds properly, the end product is markedly superior. I am not the only person knows this, and it’s starting to catch on esp. in the med scene. Maybe you should revisit this thread in a few years and see what’s changed. I'll be happy to accept your gracious 'apology' then. You want photos. I don’t have any comparison nug shots, and even if I did I doubt there’d be any discernible difference other than a slightly lighter green hue for the fast cured. That means nothing. I can’t photograph potency and aroma. If you’re so skeptical maybe you should risk a bud, follow my instructions carefully and do some double blind trials for yourself. I expect you know the drill. Then come back and tell me what you think.

or you can just continue hollering ‘BS’ on my thread, and continue backing that up with nothing but your obtuse dribble, and in doing so, continue to vindicate everything I’ve written.

YS
You can have it tested...... I test my herb. 50$ a sample. Shut us all up then.
 
midwestdensies

midwestdensies

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That makes sense, as in theory less THC will have been converted to CBN. Ideally - and I doubt anyone is going to do this - multiple samples from the same batch which have been cured both ways would be lab tested to see what the numbers tell us. Actually that would be awesome if someone did that. Would giving readings on levels of all the majors volatiles and cannabinoids.
That's called testing... Spent a couple hundred getting terpine profiles and percentages on my last run. Not that hard and I'm a beginner grower period.
 
way2green

way2green

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I would love to hear your thoughts. Everyone has swayed in 1 direction or the other. Some posts were mran spirited but most people just struggled with the rationale that "this is the wsy that makes most sense". Turns out everyone had a different thought of " makes sense.
Unfortunately, I don't think I am making any thing close to since
 
Oldmanstoner

Oldmanstoner

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Still the question of taste, smell, and appearance.

In my experience, on both side of the table is that visual, the appearance the odor an taste is the most important factor with of course the scum of the earth, the "Recreational" user. I guess maybe the "Medical" user has a varying degree of what is important but in reality I doubt that. In my experience 2 to 3 days for smaller plants to dry an 4 to 5 days for larger plants, of course normal RH in the air around 60%. Then the next day it is basically ready to sale esp to those that like "Fresh" herb, oh for the love of humanity!

So basically this fast dry would only slow me down, so.............. what am I do think? I'm such a Charlton! My very soul I guess is in serious jeopardy?

Now when the crap does sit for weeks, it does seem to take on a differing odor, some say better but moisture level is more even, obviously. Most consider themselves lucky to be on the tail end some really don't want to wait, they want it now, fresher the better for many.

To take it down a notch, IME, most people make their judgement about cannabis on Bag Appeal, Odor an Taste, then no matter the high is "Great".
 
caveman4.20

caveman4.20

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I'm not sure if anyone else has tried this but I have numerous times......so harvest comes around and I'm out of smoke and I rush a branch or two to smoke early and keep smoking on it until the rest is done curing slowly a month or so later and I notice every single time slow cured bud is stronger smelling and tasting, smokes nice staying lit evenly, and last but not least is more potent with a longer lasting effects......
 
Oldmanstoner

Oldmanstoner

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I'm not sure if anyone else has tried this but I have numerous times......so harvest comes around and I'm out of smoke and I rush a branch or two to smoke early and keep smoking on it until the rest is done curing slowly a month or so later and I notice every single time slow cured bud is stronger smelling and tasting, smokes nice staying lit evenly, and last but not least is more potent with a longer lasting effects......

I would agree but with potency I have never really notice a difference, of course I'm always stoned so maybe I'm not the best judge on that???
 
caveman4.20

caveman4.20

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I've bagged it boxed it microwaved it oven pilot flame only dry, sundried shit my favorite is rolling it sticky and decarboxylizing it on a 600 w ballast inside an envelope:cigar:
One time I rolled a few preemy joints and dried em on the reflect or....oh Ya ove dried blunts with car heater vents....all above worked just nothing as good as my current slow cure method
I may one day try a food dehydrater at low temps for a few day dry but i wouldn't call that a cured bud.....
 
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