If you have chemistry questions....

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Cark

Cark

Youv you back on the forum yet pal 😎
Sorry getting use to this site & new phone ..

You no anyone that can do me a custom nutrent profile if I give the npk & ppm for each element.!
Can I show you what am thinking.?
 
LarryFisherman

LarryFisherman

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Hello! I have a rather important question for you. I know this thread has been quiet for a while now so I may just send you a private message, anyways; I'm currently starting a grow in coco. My base nutrient is called jacks citrus (20-10-20) [I have a few other additives going in there: amino acids, soluble gypsum, humic acid, yucca to name a few]. My question for you has to do with nitrogen, specifically urea, and its availability in coco. From what I understand, the plant requires nitrifying bacteria to convert urea into ammonium. Coco is supposedly inert and, if you're unfamiliar, jacks citrus has nitrogen in 3 forms (ammonium: 2%, nitrate 3%, and urea 15%). As you can see, there is quite a bit of urea in my mix and is basically my main source of nitrogen until I switch later in flowering to something with a little less N (the mix I'm switching to contains no urea), so my concern is that the coco does not have the microbial activity necessary to nitrify the urea. I do not have any plans to use microbes in this grow for a number of reasons (i'm not opposed to it, just wasn't planning on it). I have also looked through the formulas for both ammonification and nitrification HERE, at first I thought both processes only required either water, hydrogen, or oxygen, without noticing the sub-script about naturally occurring soil bacterium converting the nutrients. I believe I wrongly assumed that the reaction would occur in an inert media despite the lack of microbial activity. If this is true, my plants will be missing out on a majority of their nitrogen. Any light you can shed on this topic would be greatly appreciated!
 
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