Mephisto Canna Cheese first time auto grow.

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beluga

beluga

Excuse the interruption 🤭 ...
I'm still in the (half) dark ages with this photoperiod mentality... of the mindset that interrupting the schedule promotes hermaphroditism or foxtailing or whatever undesirable trait. (Bear with me - it's been a while.)
Not trying to question anyone's experience with using a different photoperiod, just curious if anyone has got some further reading for me specifically on the interruption/necessary duration of a night (or day) cycle for photos. In my (admittedly) brief search, I'm only finding information pertinent to autos.
That article you (amekins) linked made some concise sense of their requirements based on the plant's energy consumption and subsequently makes sense that, so long as you provide those parameters, the plants will flourish. But I'm interested to see what their adaptability (or prosperity?) to shorter, more frequent intervals might be.
I know in terms of kwh, you're not using any less power (though, maybe you are... if you can utilize this to minimize your environmental control.) But, for whatever reason, I do definitely like the idea of not having anything running for more uninterrupted time than need be. And, since we're generally not on metallic ballasts anymore, I don't see the startup draw being so much of an issue. And if it can benefit the plants? Even better.

Thanks. Piqued my intrigue... will certainly be following.
 
Moshmen

Moshmen

I’ve done it all with autos! From topping to cloning did it all at least once or twice just to see the results for myself. Lst to even the canopy only the way I roll most times but often just let em go! Depends on ur light set up.

Most are more resilient than people think , no they don’t like stress but a little never hurt

Biggest thing for me is overfeeding.
 
Moshmen

Moshmen

Cool, thanks for the heads up! I tried to go by reputation for consistency and quality because there are too many stories out there of bad auto genetics and people getting really funky results.
For sure I’ve had those stories from reputable seed companies
My favorite knowns are
00 seeds
Dutch passion
And I have very potent results from a lesser known Flash seeds
 
Growrx

Growrx

For sure I’ve had those stories from reputable seed companies
My favorite knowns are
00 seeds
Dutch passion
And I have very potent results from a lesser known Flash seeds
+1 on 00 seeds, my chocolate skunk is currently drying but is super sticky and smells great 😋
 
Moshmen

Moshmen

Excuse the interruption 🤭 ...
I'm still in the (half) dark ages with this photoperiod mentality... of the mindset that interrupting the schedule promotes hermaphroditism or foxtailing or whatever undesirable trait. (Bear with me - it's been a while.)
Not trying to question anyone's experience with using a different photoperiod, just curious if anyone has got some further reading for me specifically on the interruption/necessary duration of a night (or day) cycle for photos. In my (admittedly) brief search, I'm only finding information pertinent to autos.
That article you (amekins) linked made some concise sense of their requirements based on the plant's energy consumption and subsequently makes sense that, so long as you provide those parameters, the plants will flourish. But I'm interested to see what their adaptability (or prosperity?) to shorter, more frequent intervals might be.
I know in terms of kwh, you're not using any less power (though, maybe you are... if you can utilize this to minimize your environmental control.) But, for whatever reason, I do definitely like the idea of not having anything running for more uninterrupted time than need be. And, since we're generally not on metallic ballasts anymore, I don't see the startup draw being so much of an issue. And if it can benefit the plants? Even better.

Thanks. Piqued my intrigue... will certainly be following.
I can’t remember who but some one here is having good success run 9/3 9/3 ? Personally haven’t tried it yet
But it makes sense as some strains don’t like my intense led fir long periods - so I acually just bout a 2 output digital timer just need to install and im goin to try it as well ? See what happens ? Lol
 
Grownsince95

Grownsince95

❤🌱❤🤘😁✌
Supporter
Excuse the interruption 🤭 ...
I'm still in the (half) dark ages with this photoperiod mentality... of the mindset that interrupting the schedule promotes hermaphroditism or foxtailing or whatever undesirable trait. (Bear with me - it's been a while.)
Not trying to question anyone's experience with using a different photoperiod, just curious if anyone has got some further reading for me specifically on the interruption/necessary duration of a night (or day) cycle for photos. In my (admittedly) brief search, I'm only finding information pertinent to autos.
That article you (amekins) linked made some concise sense of their requirements based on the plant's energy consumption and subsequently makes sense that, so long as you provide those parameters, the plants will flourish. But I'm interested to see what their adaptability (or prosperity?) to shorter, more frequent intervals might be.
I know in terms of kwh, you're not using any less power (though, maybe you are... if you can utilize this to minimize your environmental control.) But, for whatever reason, I do definitely like the idea of not having anything running for more uninterrupted time than need be. And, since we're generally not on metallic ballasts anymore, I don't see the startup draw being so much of an issue. And if it can benefit the plants? Even better.

Thanks. Piqued my intrigue... will certainly be following.
I due it solely because when I started making time lapse videos of my plants it was obvious they were "giving up" and getting droopy after about 14 hrs from the high DLI. Seeing that some of my lights are not dimmable I was looking for a different solution and that's what I decided on. I tried 6/2 first and that works too. The time lapse now shows them vigorous throughout the entire ligjt cycle(s)
 
Moshmen

Moshmen

I due it solely because when I started making time lapse videos of my plants it was obvious they were "giving up" and getting droopy after about 14 hrs from the high DLI. Seeing that some of my lights are not dimmable I was looking for a different solution and that's what I decided on. I tried 6/2 first and that works too. The time lapse now shows them vigorous throughout the entire ligjt cycle(s)
Prolly ur thread I seen this in ? Lmao
 
Milson

Milson

Supporter
Excuse the interruption 🤭 ...
I'm still in the (half) dark ages with this photoperiod mentality... of the mindset that interrupting the schedule promotes hermaphroditism or foxtailing or whatever undesirable trait. (Bear with me - it's been a while.)
Not trying to question anyone's experience with using a different photoperiod, just curious if anyone has got some further reading for me specifically on the interruption/necessary duration of a night (or day) cycle for photos. In my (admittedly) brief search, I'm only finding information pertinent to autos.
That article you (amekins) linked made some concise sense of their requirements based on the plant's energy consumption and subsequently makes sense that, so long as you provide those parameters, the plants will flourish. But I'm interested to see what their adaptability (or prosperity?) to shorter, more frequent intervals might be.
I know in terms of kwh, you're not using any less power (though, maybe you are... if you can utilize this to minimize your environmental control.) But, for whatever reason, I do definitely like the idea of not having anything running for more uninterrupted time than need be. And, since we're generally not on metallic ballasts anymore, I don't see the startup draw being so much of an issue. And if it can benefit the plants? Even better.

Thanks. Piqued my intrigue... will certainly be following.

So this is like, offensively loose reasoning, but this is what I have for now. In other words, please take this as a dispatch from another planet telling you the wisdom of the Milsonians. You should definitely just take what I have and put it into your model to the extent you use it at all.

Anyway. My understanding is that plants measure darkness by a chemical called phytochrome, which is essentially a chemical that reacts to a certain wavelength of light. In that light's absence, it transforms to a slightly different compound. Then it turns back when it gets the light again. The plant measures how long it stays in that slightly different darkness compound form. The theory behind why the plant would bother with this relates to reproduction.

Basically, if the light source is the sun, then the length of day is correlated with the season. Once night gets long enough, winter is close enough that the plant starts flowering. The plant is predicting how long it has to find a mate before winter comes based on the length of night.

It is selectively better to find a mate because that gives genetic diversity and leads to more vigorous plants. However, if it is pretty certain a mate just isn't coming, the plant kind of hits a panic button and produces pollen to make sure it makes at least some seeds before winter. How long the plant waits to hit that panic button is one form of the trait of hermaphroditic plants. Breeders in general try to breed that to as late as possible (way after THC is prime) almost immediately. The other form of herming is stress related and basically separate as far as I am concerned.

However, if a plant's measure of what time in the season it is gets really messed up because all the sudden it's like it moved back in time (night got shorter and winter got further away), most plants will just freaking panic at that point and get seeds down because the end times are near.

NOW, autos contain genes from a plant called ruderalis from Russia. There, winter comes so fast that plants just get on with reproduction asap and don't try to time when the winter will come (again I am wincing writing this but honestly this is how loose my understanding is and I am just trying to share). As such, it does not matter what the light cycle is. The plants just don't really use it much as far as I know. Anyway, breeders bred this flowering trait into plants to make what we call autos.

So, to the best of my understanding, that is how this is working. Again, there is probably a lot wrong here. The Milsonians are not necessarily the brightest people, but they are trying.

So why would this matter and why would he do this? To manage other factors and because it does not matter, at least to an auto.
 
amekins

amekins

So this is like, offensively loose reasoning, but this is what I have for now. In other words, please take this as a dispatch from another planet telling you the wisdom of the Milsonians. You should definitely just take what I have and put it into your model to the extent you use it at all.

Anyway. My understanding is that plants measure darkness by a chemical called phytochrome, which is essentially a chemical that reacts to a certain wavelength of light. In that light's absence, it transforms to a slightly different compound. Then it turns back when it gets the light again. The plant measures how long it stays in that slightly different darkness compound form. The theory behind why the plant would bother with this relates to reproduction.

Basically, if the light source is the sun, then the length of day is correlated with the season. Once night gets long enough, winter is close enough that the plant starts flowering. The plant is predicting how long it has to find a mate before winter comes based on the length of night.

It is selectively better to find a mate because that gives genetic diversity and leads to more vigorous plants. However, if it is pretty certain a mate just isn't coming, the plant kind of hits a panic button and produces pollen to make sure it makes at least some seeds before winter. How long the plant waits to hit that panic button is one form of the trait of hermaphroditic plants. Breeders in general try to breed that to as late as possible (way after THC is prime) almost immediately. The other form of herming is stress related and basically separate as far as I am concerned.

However, if a plant's measure of what time in the season it is gets really messed up because all the sudden it's like it moved back in time (night got shorter and winter got further away), most plants will just freaking panic at that point and get seeds down because the end times are near.

NOW, autos contain genes from a plant called ruderalis from Russia. There, winter comes so fast that plants just get on with reproduction asap and don't try to time when the winter will come (again I am wincing writing this but honestly this is how loose my understanding is and I am just trying to share). As such, it does not matter what the light cycle is. The plants just don't really use it much as far as I know. Anyway, breeders bred this flowering trait into plants to make what we call autos.

So, to the best of my understanding, that is how this is working. Again, there is probably a lot wrong here. The Milsonians are not necessarily the brightest people, but they are trying.

So why would this matter and why would he do this? To manage other factors and because it does not matter, at least to an auto.
That is generally my understanding as well. I’m not sure of the impact of phytochrome in the triggering of fertility though. Lack of knowledge.
 
Moshmen

Moshmen

So this is like, offensively loose reasoning, but this is what I have for now. In other words, please take this as a dispatch from another planet telling you the wisdom of the Milsonians. You should definitely just take what I have and put it into your model to the extent you use it at all.

Anyway. My understanding is that plants measure darkness by a chemical called phytochrome, which is essentially a chemical that reacts to a certain wavelength of light. In that light's absence, it transforms to a slightly different compound. Then it turns back when it gets the light again. The plant measures how long it stays in that slightly different darkness compound form. The theory behind why the plant would bother with this relates to reproduction.

Basically, if the light source is the sun, then the length of day is correlated with the season. Once night gets long enough, winter is close enough that the plant starts flowering. The plant is predicting how long it has to find a mate before winter comes based on the length of night.

It is selectively better to find a mate because that gives genetic diversity and leads to more vigorous plants. However, if it is pretty certain a mate just isn't coming, the plant kind of hits a panic button and produces pollen to make sure it makes at least some seeds before winter. How long the plant waits to hit that panic button is one form of the trait of hermaphroditic plants. Breeders in general try to breed that to as late as possible (way after THC is prime) almost immediately. The other form of herming is stress related and basically separate as far as I am concerned.

However, if a plant's measure of what time in the season it is gets really messed up because all the sudden it's like it moved back in time (night got shorter and winter got further away), most plants will just freaking panic at that point and get seeds down because the end times are near.

NOW, autos contain genes from a plant called ruderalis from Russia. There, winter comes so fast that plants just get on with reproduction asap and don't try to time when the winter will come (again I am wincing writing this but honestly this is how loose my understanding is and I am just trying to share). As such, it does not matter what the light cycle is. The plants just don't really use it much as far as I know. Anyway, breeders bred this flowering trait into plants to make what we call autos.

So, to the best of my understanding, that is how this is working. Again, there is probably a lot wrong here. The Milsonians are not necessarily the brightest people, but they are trying.

So why would this matter and why would he do this? To manage other factors and because it does not matter, at least to an auto.
Perfect - u been hanging with the big dogs ! Mimed -aqua and the 5/6 other that due their homework ! Thanx for sharing ( not my threD but I still enjoyed it)!
 
Milson

Milson

Supporter
Thank you, very much.
I'm sure it's a hell of lot to get out of the lay, so I definitely appreciate the use of terms like, "oh, fuck! gotta mate!" responses.
I'll have to see what sci-hub has on phytochrome... that's a new one for me and seems to be the key to satisfy what I'm wondering.

2.3 and 2.4

The guy has a book too but it's almost exactly the same info. It's free to register and they have a ton of awesome content on there. The courses really just start whenever you want them to lol.
 
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