Road Kill Skunk - Ester Alcohols, Train-wreck and the Catpiss Connection

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ritoMox

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Dam this shit is blowing my mind. Fucking crazy man I wonder what would happen if you took the oldest skunk seed stock you can find and then exposed it to this method? What a trip!
I thought so, too. I got turned onto Electroculture in general by watching a video by Aaron Murakami. Here's a preview of the video that I ended up purchasing along with his pdf "Electro-Biohacking, Influincing gene expression with dielectric fields and experimental proof that it works". 2021 ESTC Prev., Practical Methods for Electrostatic Stimulation Upon Organic Growth, Griffin Brock
 
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ritoMox

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Dam this shit is blowing my mind. Fucking crazy man I wonder what would happen if you took the oldest skunk seed stock you can find and then exposed it to this method? What a trip!
Reading through the comments from the link that I posted in my last post got me thinking: Is it possible to revive a strain using a tissue culture obtained from dried, seemingly dead plants/buds using the Ebner effect?

Here's the comments that got me thinking along these lines:
Q: "Correct me if i'm wrong here, but plants die off every autumn of every year and re-grow the next spring anyway? What is this proving?"
A: "It's proving that even in instances where the plant remains dead for the whole year, it's possible to quickly regenerate plant growth with the application of high frequency potentials."
Q: "Can you give me an example of a plant that remains dead for a whole year? They all die for about 6 months and are re-born naturally. Is this guy trying to improve on gods work or what?
A: "I have had plants in extremely dry soil, not taken care of, and simply dry up. They remain like that for a year, since the climate in which they sit in is far too hot, and they are not made for that kind of heat. But when HF potentials are added, they become revived. You should get the whole presentation to see what is being described, since this preview is attentuated." See Highlighted comments

In instances where clone/seed can't be obtained, yet dried/cured bud can be obtained, if this Ebner tech could revive dried, seemingly dead plants, well, the sky is not the limit!
 
Backyard_Boogie

Backyard_Boogie

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Reading through the comments from the link that I posted in my last post got me thinking: Is it possible to revive a strain using a tissue culture obtained from dried, seemingly dead plants/buds using the Ebner effect?

Here's the comments that got me thinking along these lines:
Q: "Correct me if i'm wrong here, but plants die off every autumn of every year and re-grow the next spring anyway? What is this proving?"
A: "It's proving that even in instances where the plant remains dead for the whole year, it's possible to quickly regenerate plant growth with the application of high frequency potentials."
Q: "Can you give me an example of a plant that remains dead for a whole year? They all die for about 6 months and are re-born naturally. Is this guy trying to improve on gods work or what?
A: "I have had plants in extremely dry soil, not taken care of, and simply dry up. They remain like that for a year, since the climate in which they sit in is far too hot, and they are not made for that kind of heat. But when HF potentials are added, they become revived. You should get the whole presentation to see what is being described, since this preview is attentuated." See Highlighted comments

In instances where clone/seed can't be obtained, yet dried/cured bud can be obtained, if this Ebner tech could revive dried, seemingly dead plants, well, the sky is not the limit!
I don't think you can revive plants from completely dried and 100% dead specimens but perhaps Im mistaken. When the plants "die" during the winter they are not technically dead they are dormant and they first drop their leaves then pull all their energy into the trunk, stalks, and branches in order to hibernate and survive through the winter freeze. Then once spring comes and the temperatures rise above freezing it triggers a response internally and the plant uses its stored energy to push new leaf growth back out thus repeating the annual seasonal process. Technically the plants never died during the process I do not think. But fuck man what do I know? I'm no botanist so perhaps there is a way to bring dead plant cells back to life that would be epic. Maybe this Ebner has something to do with it
 
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ritoMox

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I don't think you can revive plants from completely dried and 100% dead specimens but perhaps Im mistaken. When the plants "die" during the winter they are not technically dead they are dormant and they first drop their leaves then pull all their energy into the trunk, stalks, and branches in order to hibernate and survive through the winter freeze. Then once spring comes and the temperatures rise above freezing it triggers a response internally and the plant uses its stored energy to push new leaf growth back out thus repeating the annual seasonal process. Technically the plants never died during the process I do not think. But fuck man what do I know? I'm no botanist so perhaps there is a way to bring dead plant cells back to life that would be epic. Maybe this Ebner has something to do with it
Yea, I was thinking more along the lines of regeneration of cells that may not be quite dead from drying out. That open mind you got there: "perhaps there is a way to bring dead plant cells back to life that would be epic", is most definitely how we Git-r-done👍
 
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ritoMox

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what a great thread thanks for sharing all that figure maybe i could throw a couple ideas out here. i think the esters ether aldehydes ketones oxygenated terpenoids can still be found, but not in indoor inbred lines. the missing factor is the results of domestication. terpenes esters even cannabinoids they all serve a purpose for the plant, a defense weapon usually against bugs fungi bacteria etc. while all plants produce a base set of terpenes, an induced set also exists which becomes irrelevant inside. these are called induced oleoresins.

a good example is korean conifer trees and delta carene. a healthy pine has nearly 0 delta carene. however, upon attack by a pine wilt nematode, huge amounts of carene are released. now im not saying we have to infect our plants, but even inside we can mimic these relationships by using hormones or simulating insect attacks. methyl jasmonate is the alarm hormone plants use which is activated by an attack, and in turn activates these oleoresins. chitin is a ground up mix of beetle shells and insides. when a plant root system comes in contact, they think an attack is happening, increase their hormone alarm and release oleoresin. both of these ingredients are safe to use and fairly inexpensive.
i think its interesting that rks was seen alot in the uncle fester sk18, which was torture tested to become a pest resistant line. to make it bulletproof it was intentionally infected/attacked/neglected by the breeders. now this brings me to concepts like epigenetics and methylation. these are adjustments to regulation of genes which are inheritable, but also have an on/off component. they also dont show up in dna tests. instead they work thru gene and synthase transcription. basically a sort of memory or switch board for the plants defense system.
in the 60s regardless of the line, many p1 plants were very generationally close to their home/adapted environment whether that be feral or farmed. since these epigenetics and hormone alarms can be inherited the first few generations would continue to act as it normally would. but either due to a milder climate or a trip inside, the plants would slowly silence or adjust these switches to the muted forms we see today. now trainwreck i believe was built with a lowland thai which comes from a harsh environment. so it makes sense that they would be keyed up to provide those amazing qualities you described. one thing i like to do is search for different uses the plant has for certain aromatic elements, like the carene example. sulfur compounds, amines etc are probly a big piece of the puzzle. with all the access we have to different heirlooms, landraces it could be helpful to infuse certain stinky lines into domesticated lines with potential, to awaken their wild side. so thanks for all the great info!!
Excellent post! That stank dank was highly coveted in my time and place (Southern New Mexico, late 70's early 80's). We were so close to the border that all we really ever got was seeds-a-million, dirt weed. But on that rare occasion, someway somehow, we got that bomb stank that would have you puking up your ramen (broke days!) from the smell alone. Smoking it added a lung to your ramen!
Your post got me thinking that maybe we should be hunting the evolution/technique that gave rise to that stank, rather than the strain itself. Perhaps we can awaken that stank in any strain with a proper external trigger, and over the course of a few generations have it stabilized(?) Your post is precisely inline with old-school growing. I know that folks like to refer to this type of growing as bro science, but if you think about it, everything starts out as bro science. Inspirational post. Really got me thinking. The quest for that stank dank is a worthy quest, indeed. Thank you👍
 
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ritoMox

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Well technically there is the genome project and the genetic galaxy mapping so there is a way to tell what the genetic lineage is of a plant by testing it. But when it comes to RKS everyone argues about it. Some say it's Indica others say it's Sativa. I personally believe it probably had a sativa expression probably Mexican or columbian with some afghan too. But you are correct RKS is incredibly subjective its shitty. I am done putting labels on shit I am just simply looking for really loud expressive skunky smelling herb. I don't care what you call it anymore if it makes my nose perk up and its good then I will run it. The skunkier the better. Im trying as many old school strains as I can.
I'm sure that you're already familiar with this, but if not, this is a pretty enticing description: "From 20 females I have grown from the original seeds I received, I have gotten 2 legit Road Kill type Skunk females...Spot on Road Kill Skunk terpenes/smells, no ifs ands or buts...It’s almost cat-pissy in its acrid/sour nature, very close". Link: Red Russian
 
Backyard_Boogie

Backyard_Boogie

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I'm sure that you're already familiar with this, but if not, this is a pretty enticing description: "From 20 females I have grown from the original seeds I received, I have gotten 2 legit Road Kill type Skunk females...Spot on Road Kill Skunk terpenes/smells, no ifs ands or buts...It’s almost cat-pissy in its acrid/sour nature, very close". Link: Red Russian
Awesome man! Im down to try it. I will throw it in the mix for sure I have so much vintage skunk shit going Im bound to find something good! I love the description "It’s almost cat-pissy in its acrid/sour nature, very close" thats exactly what Im looking for. When you ran this how was the nug density? Is it more tight like an indica or fluffy like a sativa?
 
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ritoMox

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Didn't run it, bud. On the hunt for that old-school STANK, just like you👍
"...yielding pretty classic Skunk looking buds...but there are for sure real Skunk, real funk, and real Piney gems in here".
 
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ritoMox

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your insights are right on the money. heres some cool info for you on sulfur compounds in cannabis. i normally dont like hype strains, but having grown gelato 33 it def reeks.


the first link is an article summary the second is the full paper. continuing on the soil, not only the content of fungi/bacteria facilitates, but also the swampy nature comes into play as well. using skunk cabbage as a comparison, the sulfur compounds thrive in acidic aerobic environments. so the boggy ness is key. now calcium oxalate is mentioned in the article as a key component of the skunk cabbage leaf which aids in plant protect, but also encourages the formation of these compounds. now a lot of plants which have volatile sulfur compounds deploy them in order to attract specific rare pollinators ie beetles and flies as opposed to bees butterfly etc. the carrion odor produced for these pollinators mimic smell of dead/decaying odors which these pollinators thrive on. in fact skunk cabbage is thermogenic- able to produce its own heat source which increases the range and content of these compounds for attraction. in this way the hps and high temperatures mentioned certainly amplified the smells. i find it interesting that kentucky/ohio/ virginia were many times the source of these rks acclimated lines. in the 1800s chinese hemp was brought in to kentucky. this is relevant because asian hemp as been shown to produce piperdine, which as a member of the amine family has incredibly pungent smell and attracts flies. is it possible that there was admixture with the afghan/mexican hybrids in these areas? and did the specific anaerobic bacteria in the swampy environment cause the skunk lines to transform and metabolize these asian hemp like profiles.

the article also points out the similarity between garlic/onion and skunk smell. these profiles are found in guerrero landraces, and according the sam the ratman, the Colombian gold x afghan hybrid was put to aco gold as the final step for sk1. since a golds close proximity to guerrero , maybe the Mexican component is more important .mountain organics has the real deal a gold and has used "beaver musk" to describe its profile. outside of the roadkill name, rks description sometimes skips over the skunk part. to me, the immediate and drastic skunk musk odor of roadkill is mostly due to all of the skunk musk being released at once due to the pressure of being run over. sulfur compounds and amines in plants are designed to attract far away pollinators in plants in the same way a skunks spray is immediately detected in animals as a deterrent. very cool research man
Kentucky, coal mines? Sounds like they were growing weed in sulfur rich areas. The microbiome that eats that sulfur sounds like the key! "Such organisms thrive in acidic sulfur springs and in association with mining activities where microbial oxidation of pyrite and other reduced sulfur compounds lead to the formation of sulfuric acid". The clues are coming together! Link: Acidophiles Link: Acidophile
 
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GrowHobo

GrowHobo

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Kentucky, coal mines? Sounds like they were growing weed in sulfur rich areas. The microbiome that eats that sulfur sounds like the key! "Such organisms thrive in acidic sulfur springs and in association with mining activities where microbial oxidation of pyrite and other reduced sulfur compounds lead to the formation of sulfuric acid". The clues are coming together! Link: Acidophiles
Don’t forget everyone used to use Malathion for ipm. Supposed to be real skunky on its own
 
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ritoMox

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Don’t forget everyone used to use Malathion for ipm. Supposed to be real skunky on its own
Wow, interesting. Malathion contains Sulfanyl, "a simple radical molecule consisting of one hydrogen and one sulfur atom". Link: Sulfanyl Link: Malathion
So it seems that the Cal Skunk was most likely being sprayed with Malathion for bugs, whereas the Kentucky Skunk was grown in sulfur rich areas with the microbiome doing the work just like TLO tech. Very interesting! This guy's comment makes even more sense now: "You've described run of the mill polyhybrid herb from the era. Too much flavor. No direction in breeding because it all came out overly dank and complex". Link: #103
 
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ritoMox

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So it's sounding like it's not that those stank genes/traits have been bred out of the stank skunk, but rather the skunk today is merely a product of our modern day grow tech (e.g. hydro, etc.); that is, the skunk of today has been bred to grow best with the tech of today, which doesn't bring out the stank.
If this is the case, then bringing out that stank should be as simple as switching back to the growing conditions used in the stank days, and after so many generations we should have joy.
 
Buzzzz

Buzzzz

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So it's sounding like it's not that those stank genes/traits have been bred out of the stank skunk, but rather the skunk today is merely a product of our modern day grow tech (e.g. hydro, etc.); that is, the skunk of today has been bred to grow best with the tech of today, which doesn't bring out the stank.
If this is the case, then bringing out that stank should be as simple as switching back to the growing conditions used in the stank days, and after so many generations we should have joy.
Not sure if it is that simple but it is an interesting take.My plants share the same aroma indoor and outdoor,hydroponics or soil,seed after seed and crosses reflect it as well to a degree both ways and I can select for more or less aroma and it continues. I think it's genetic and is to repel predators or attract (if found desirable like some humans do)depending on aroma since all plants do it,also some tomato plants smell skunky as does cabbage, but I'm just speculating,perhaps degree of odor would change depending on severity of predator infestation. I think plants possess all sorts of odor defense as to which worked for them in their native origin.That would also mean other aromas are dependent on the theory, so pretty soon weed could be odorless if medium was devoid of certain chemicals?
 
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ritoMox

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Not sure if it is that simple but it is an interesting take.My plants share the same aroma indoor and outdoor,hydroponics or soil,seed after seed and crosses reflect it as well to a degree both ways and I can select for more or less aroma and it continues. I think it's genetic and is to repel predators or attract (if found desirable like some humans do)depending on aroma since all plants do it,also some tomato plants smell skunky as does cabbage, but I'm just speculating,perhaps degree of odor would change depending on severity of predator infestation. I think plants possess all sorts of odor defense as to which worked for them in their native origin.That would also mean other aromas are dependent on the theory, so pretty soon weed could be odorless if medium was devoid of certain chemicals?
Sounds like we are blanding out our weed, for sure.
 
Garbage_bear

Garbage_bear

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I think we all need to go back to in ground organic growing. The problem will probably fix itself. Right now cannnabis thinks that it needs to be fruity for posterity.
 

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