Road Kill Skunk - Ester Alcohols, Train-wreck and the Catpiss Connection

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Backyard_Boogie

Backyard_Boogie

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Not to be a Debbie downer, but not sure the fat leaf is the one. Wouldnt it be the aca/columbian leaner? Unless...... the rks pheno is the afgani leaner?! Riot ran a bunch of affies, and he said some are straight stank. Excited to see your results diesel!!
Yes this is true the real RKS was a Indica/Sativa hybrid. However some rare indica dominant phenotypes can still be really skunky.
 
Jmaes Mabley

Jmaes Mabley

701
143
While Im Skeptical, a very Reliable, and Respected Breeder, claims the RKS, has been found, and has been released.

There are 2 different phenotypes that were made.

The 2, are clone only, and go by the names.

79 Florida Heirloom Skunk

81 Heirloom Skunk.

The breeder that has them is Katsu. He bought the genetics from Sunshine State Seed Company, who got the cuts from an older guy, who has held these genes since the 70s. It was released 1 time, 10 years ago. I have no info on that release, though it was minimal

Sunshine State, also has regulars, called Florida Super Skunk. I ordered 2 packs, last night, from Strainly.

I ordered the 79 Heirloom S1, from SSSC, and the Southern Super Skunk,. And ordered the 81, from Katsu,, as his S1 79s, sold out in minutes. He still has some S1s of the 81.

I also dont normally order Fem seeds, but, I will if thats the only way to get the genetics.

As I said, Katsu is very respected, and Im just passing along the info, and cannot attest, that the seeds are indeed, the real thing. I figured if they are, Ill have the genetics, and if not? Just another dead end street.

Katsu, also crossed the 79-81 together, and those were the Freebies. 3 Fem Seeds of it.

!ast time I ordered from SSSC, they sent me the wrong order. They sent me 2 strains crossed, with the 81 Skunk. S1s of Green Crack Cush x 81 Skunk, and Fowl Egg, which I dont know what the genes are. Either the 79-81, crossed with something.


This is the description, on Katsu web page.

Ah, the nostalgia of “skunk weed” from the 80s and 90s is a tale that resonates with cannabis connoisseurs and enthusiasts alike. “Roadkill Skunk”, known for its pungent funk reeking of skunk spray, has become somewhat of a legend in the cannabis community. Its distinctive terpene profile, characterized by a strong, skunky smell, was a hallmark of high-quality weed during that era. For some, the acrid odor of burning sulfur was enough to make your eyes water if you stood too close to the plant. Outdoors with a nice breeze, you could smell dead skunk from over a mile away.
During the dark ages of prohibition, however, strong smelling weed was exactly the sort of thing that would get cultivators busted and even if you were running a couple of carbon filters, it wasn’t enough to cover up the smell. Growers were drawn to strains with little to no smell in flower and, as the years passed, the noxious skunk spray odor seemed to just disappear, almost as if it were a relic of a bygone era. For more than a decade, the smell of roadkill skunk has been the subject of relentless pursuit by growers and users alike, each yearning to recapture that nostalgic essence.
The skunk weed of the 80s and 90s was not just known for its smell; it was a symbol of the counterculture movement, a physical representation of rebellion and freedom. Its aroma filled the air at concerts, festivals, and in the backrooms of underground clubs. The potent smell was instantly recognizable, and for many, it evoked memories of youth, liberation, and the carefree days of the past. As the cannabis industry evolved, new strains with varied aromas and effects emerged, and the classic skunk scent became a rarity, much to the dismay of those who longed for the nostalgia it brought.
The quest for the original skunk weed has been like searching for a treasure feared lost forever. Growers have scoured seed banks, exchanged cuttings, and experimented with crossbreeding in hopes of rediscovering the skunky aroma. Despite their efforts, the exact terpene profile remained elusive, leaving a yearning in the hearts of the old stoners who remembered it wistfully.
But after years of dead ends and “sweet” terps, there seems to be good news on the horizon for those chasing the olfactory ghost of the roadkill skunk. The recent release of the ‘79 and the ’81 Florida Heirloom Skunk clones has sparked excitement within the cannabis community. Held tightly by a breeder with Sunshine Seed Co now in his 70’s, these recently released treasures just may be the missing link that enthusiasts have been lusting for.
As it is described, the ‘79 Florida Heirloom Skunk stands out not just for its growth and potency, but for its remarkably offensive odor, a pungent assault on the senses, a noxious mixture that harkens back to the unmistakable stench of rotting eggs mingled with the sharpness of ammonia. This olfactory experience is so overpowering and repugnant that it’s almost offensive, yet for those who remember, it’s a nostalgic trip back to the days when cannabis had a wild, untamed aroma. While both exhibit the eye-watering bite of sulfur and ammonia – the ’79 really pushes the limit of what the senses can handle and, as stinky as the ’81 is, seems mild in comparison.
The flowering cycle of this heirloom strain spans 84 to 88 days, during which its already potent smell intensifies and evolves. Harvesting around day 81 yields a product with a headier and more stimulating effect, but it’s in the later stages of flowering, particularly around day 84, that the balance between its foul scent and psychoactive potency reaches its peak. For the true connoisseurs who yearn for the maximum expression of its foulness, letting the plant mature till day 86 or 88 is key. Be warned, though – by this time, the smell becomes almost insufferably rank, a true testament to its skunk lineage and a challenge even for the most seasoned of enthusiasts.
Both the ’79 and the ’81 are EXCEPTIONAL representations of a long-gone era, with the ’79 being the FAR MORE OFFENSIVE of the two and more of what I was looking for. Given the age of both, I think the S1’s and the crosses (I crossed both of them to each other) are going to put a BIG SMILE on a lot of old grower’s faces
I’m excited to help reintroduce these legendary strains back into the modern cannabis landscape and to a new generation of growers. It’s not just about the nostalgia or the pursuit of a long-lost aroma, it’s about reconnecting with a piece of history, a time when cannabis culture was in its formative stages, and each strain had its own story. The Florida Heirloom Skunks are more than just plants; they’re a living piece of the past, a testament to the rich and varied history of cannabis. With the rediscovery of roadkill skunk, we don’t just get a chance to experience its unique aroma; we have the opportunity to revive a part of our culture that was almost forgotten.
A friend is currently growing out both the ’81 and the ’79 and commented:
“I’m running several 1979 & 1981 heirloom skunk plants, and right hand to god my driveway is 375 feet – 465 feet to my mailbox and I can smell that shit before getting out of my truck to get the mail (and i am running double carbon filters. I love that stinky shit, even if I occasionally gag from the sour-rotten-egg ,baby shit, ammonia, and 7 day old skunk roadkill.”


Photo of 79 Heirloom Skunk.

I will say. This does look like what we had back from 79-1984, when a rat, ratted out my buddy who was growing it.
What he had, was Narrow Leaf, and was done LATE, Outside. Last of October. And the plants got big.

These take 84-88 days to finish.

Bad thing is, I wont be able to grow them, any time soon.

1708537426834

1708537487532


1708537534674

Ah, the nostalgia of “skunk weed” from the 80s and 90s is a tale that resonates with cannabis connoisseurs and enthusiasts alike. “Roadkill Skunk”, known for its pungent funk reeking of skunk spray, has become somewhat of a legend in the cannabis community. Its distinctive terpene profile, characterized by a strong, skunky smell, was a hallmark of high-quality weed during that era. For some, the acrid odor of burning sulfur was enough to make your eyes water if you stood too close to the plant. Outdoors with a nice breeze, you could smell dead skunk from over a mile away.
During the dark ages of prohibition, however, strong smelling weed was exactly the sort of thing that would get cultivators busted and even if you were running a couple of carbon filters, it wasn’t enough to cover up the smell. Growers were drawn to strains with little to no smell in flower and, as the years passed, the noxious skunk spray odor seemed to just disappear, almost as if it were a relic of a bygone era. For more than a decade, the smell of roadkill skunk has been the subject of relentless pursuit by growers and users alike, each yearning to recapture that nostalgic essence.
The skunk weed of the 80s and 90s was not just known for its smell; it was a symbol of the counterculture movement, a physical representation of rebellion and freedom. Its aroma filled the air at concerts, festivals, and in the backrooms of underground clubs. The potent smell was instantly recognizable, and for many, it evoked memories of youth, liberation, and the carefree days of the past. As the cannabis industry evolved, new strains with varied aromas and effects emerged, and the classic skunk scent became a rarity, much to the dismay of those who longed for the nostalgia it brought.
The quest for the original skunk weed has been like searching for a treasure feared lost forever. Growers have scoured seed banks, exchanged cuttings, and experimented with crossbreeding in hopes of rediscovering the skunky aroma. Despite their efforts, the exact terpene profile remained elusive, leaving a yearning in the hearts of the old stoners who remembered it wistfully.
But after years of dead ends and “sweet” terps, there seems to be good news on the horizon for those chasing the olfactory ghost of the roadkill skunk. The recent release of the ‘79 and the ’81 Florida Heirloom Skunk clones has sparked excitement within the cannabis community. Held tightly by a breeder with Sunshine Seed Co now in his 70’s, these recently released treasures just may be the missing link that enthusiasts have been lusting for.
As it is described, the ‘79 Florida Heirloom Skunk stands out not just for its growth and potency, but for its remarkably offensive odor, a pungent assault on the senses, a noxious mixture that harkens back to the unmistakable stench of rotting eggs mingled with the sharpness of ammonia. This olfactory experience is so overpowering and repugnant that it’s almost offensive, yet for those who remember, it’s a nostalgic trip back to the days when cannabis had a wild, untamed aroma. While both exhibit the eye-watering bite of sulfur and ammonia – the ’79 really pushes the limit of what the senses can handle and, as stinky as the ’81 is, seems mild in comparison.
The flowering cycle of this heirloom strain spans 84 to 88 days, during which its already potent smell intensifies and evolves. Harvesting around day 81 yields a product with a headier and more stimulating effect, but it’s in the later stages of flowering, particularly around day 84, that the balance between its foul scent and psychoactive potency reaches its peak. For the true connoisseurs who yearn for the maximum expression of its foulness, letting the plant mature till day 86 or 88 is key. Be warned, though – by this time, the smell becomes almost insufferably rank, a true testament to its skunk lineage and a challenge even for the most seasoned of enthusiasts.
Both the ’79 and the ’81 are EXCEPTIONAL representations of a long-gone era, with the ’79 being the FAR MORE OFFENSIVE of the two and more of what I was looking for. Given the age of both, I think the S1’s and the crosses (I crossed both of them to each other) are going to put a BIG SMILE on a lot of old grower’s faces.

I’m excited to help reintroduce these legendary strains back into the modern cannabis landscape and to a new generation of growers. It’s not just about the nostalgia or the pursuit of a long-lost aroma, it’s about reconnecting with a piece of history, a time when cannabis culture was in its formative stages, and each strain had its own story. The Florida Heirloom Skunks are more than just plants; they’re a living piece of the past, a testament to the rich and varied history of cannabis. With the rediscovery of roadkill skunk, we don’t just get a chance to experience its unique aroma; we have the opportunity to revive a part of our culture that was almost forgotten.
A friend is currently growing out both the ’81 and the ’79 and commented:
“I’m running several 1979 & 1981 heirloom skunk plants, and right hand to god my driveway is 375 feet – 465 feet to my mailbox and I can smell that shit before getting out of my truck to get the mail (and i am running double carbon filters. I love that stinky shit, even if I occasionally gag from the sour-rotten-egg ,baby shit, ammonia, and 7 day old skunk roadkill.”




Southern Super Skunk (Holiday release)
Lineage: 1979 Skunk X 1981 Skunk
Flowering: 12-14 Weeks
Height: Medium-Tall
Smell/ Flavor: Sulphur, ammonia, pine, decaying organic matter
Description:
In the skunk projects saga, we had our breeders take our 1979 heirloom Florida skunk clone and mate it with the only old school skunk we had seeds of. After so very attentive pressure popping we were able to get seeds from the 1980’s to pop and thrive. With all hopes on a stellar male, after hoarding the seeds for decades the move was to very carefully pop and find a new 1981 male. Out of the handful of seeds we were able to get a new 1981 skunk male.
It seemed like something that needed to be done, if only for the sake of making the cross. To see what these two different flavor profiles would combine to make. I’m proper fashion we did our 60 pheno run of these seeds. Everything that came out seemed to have bits from each parent.
The sulphur stench from 79, the strong ammo is from 81 with their combined structures it worked out perfectly. More vigorous than the parents, and you will get a bit of swap to one side or the other but they’re slight differences. We did end up with a sulphur, ammonia, sage and spicy mint out of a single female from the original 60 pheno hunt from these F1’s.
It’s a bit of a combination of the nasty meets the nasty. They will all branch out, they will get tall if allowed but it’s not hard to SOG them in 5gals, drip drain to waste and flower them after about 8 days veg. They do take longer to finish in most cases. They will stretch and branch out. Taking the height and width requirements of your garden may mean you want to flower sooner or if you have ample space or are outdoors you may want to get them as large as possible.
The water temps are something you’ll want to keep consistent. She doesn’t like fluctuations in water temp rapid changes. You need to slowly build up the nutes much like old sativas require for the most part. Once they get large they will go through a substantial amount of water/reservoir. In a situation like drip drain to waste, adjustable drippers are favorable as they do tend to feed more than other sativas we have in with her. You will want to plan for 14 weeks of flower, but a few phenos did end up being 11-12 weeks.
Varietal type: Hybrid
Gender: Regular
Flowering: >80 days
Yield: High
Height: Tall

1708536647844
 
Last edited:
shaganja

shaganja

1,431
263
Not anytime soon? This is number one in my list of breeding projects I'm doing. What strains are in front of these bad girls?
 
Jmaes Mabley

Jmaes Mabley

701
143
Not anytime soon? This is number one in my list of breeding projects I'm doing. What strains are in front of these bad girls?
Nothing is ahead.

Circumstance, prohibits growing anything at this moment. But I wasnt going to let the genetics, get away.

Ive got a ton, of seeds on tap.

I did just give a buddy, an original pack, of Reeferman Willie Nelson, and 2 have popped. Out of 4. Shells are really hard. Hes going to start the other 6, and may already have. Hes in Cali. Im in Ky. A very, unfriendly state.
Hes trying to do a seed increase.
 
Backyard_Boogie

Backyard_Boogie

1,164
263
While Im Skeptical, a very Reliable, and Respected Breeder, claims the RKS, has been found, and has been released.

There are 2 different phenotypes that were made.

The 2, are clone only, and go by the names.

79 Florida Heirloom Skunk

81 Heirloom Skunk.

The breeder that has them is Katsu. He bought the genetics from Sunshine State Seed Company, who got the cuts from an older guy, who has held these genes since the 70s. It was released 1 time, 10 years ago. I have no info on that release, though it was minimal

Sunshine State, also has regulars, called Florida Super Skunk. I ordered 2 packs, last night, from Strainly.

I ordered the 79 Heirloom S1, from SSSC, and the Southern Super Skunk,. And ordered the 81, from Katsu,, as his S1 79s, sold out in minutes. He still has some S1s of the 81.

I also dont normally order Fem seeds, but, I will if thats the only way to get the genetics.

As I said, Katsu is very respected, and Im just passing along the info, and cannot attest, that the seeds are indeed, the real thing. I figured if they are, Ill have the genetics, and if not? Just another dead end street.

Katsu, also crossed the 79-81 together, and those were the Freebies. 3 Fem Seeds of it.

!ast time I ordered from SSSC, they sent me the wrong order. They sent me 2 strains crossed, with the 81 Skunk. S1s of Green Crack Cush x 81 Skunk, and Fowl Egg, which I dont know what the genes are. Either the 79-81, crossed with something.


This is the description, on Katsu web page.

Ah, the nostalgia of “skunk weed” from the 80s and 90s is a tale that resonates with cannabis connoisseurs and enthusiasts alike. “Roadkill Skunk”, known for its pungent funk reeking of skunk spray, has become somewhat of a legend in the cannabis community. Its distinctive terpene profile, characterized by a strong, skunky smell, was a hallmark of high-quality weed during that era. For some, the acrid odor of burning sulfur was enough to make your eyes water if you stood too close to the plant. Outdoors with a nice breeze, you could smell dead skunk from over a mile away.
During the dark ages of prohibition, however, strong smelling weed was exactly the sort of thing that would get cultivators busted and even if you were running a couple of carbon filters, it wasn’t enough to cover up the smell. Growers were drawn to strains with little to no smell in flower and, as the years passed, the noxious skunk spray odor seemed to just disappear, almost as if it were a relic of a bygone era. For more than a decade, the smell of roadkill skunk has been the subject of relentless pursuit by growers and users alike, each yearning to recapture that nostalgic essence.
The skunk weed of the 80s and 90s was not just known for its smell; it was a symbol of the counterculture movement, a physical representation of rebellion and freedom. Its aroma filled the air at concerts, festivals, and in the backrooms of underground clubs. The potent smell was instantly recognizable, and for many, it evoked memories of youth, liberation, and the carefree days of the past. As the cannabis industry evolved, new strains with varied aromas and effects emerged, and the classic skunk scent became a rarity, much to the dismay of those who longed for the nostalgia it brought.
The quest for the original skunk weed has been like searching for a treasure feared lost forever. Growers have scoured seed banks, exchanged cuttings, and experimented with crossbreeding in hopes of rediscovering the skunky aroma. Despite their efforts, the exact terpene profile remained elusive, leaving a yearning in the hearts of the old stoners who remembered it wistfully.
But after years of dead ends and “sweet” terps, there seems to be good news on the horizon for those chasing the olfactory ghost of the roadkill skunk. The recent release of the ‘79 and the ’81 Florida Heirloom Skunk clones has sparked excitement within the cannabis community. Held tightly by a breeder with Sunshine Seed Co now in his 70’s, these recently released treasures just may be the missing link that enthusiasts have been lusting for.
As it is described, the ‘79 Florida Heirloom Skunk stands out not just for its growth and potency, but for its remarkably offensive odor, a pungent assault on the senses, a noxious mixture that harkens back to the unmistakable stench of rotting eggs mingled with the sharpness of ammonia. This olfactory experience is so overpowering and repugnant that it’s almost offensive, yet for those who remember, it’s a nostalgic trip back to the days when cannabis had a wild, untamed aroma. While both exhibit the eye-watering bite of sulfur and ammonia – the ’79 really pushes the limit of what the senses can handle and, as stinky as the ’81 is, seems mild in comparison.
The flowering cycle of this heirloom strain spans 84 to 88 days, during which its already potent smell intensifies and evolves. Harvesting around day 81 yields a product with a headier and more stimulating effect, but it’s in the later stages of flowering, particularly around day 84, that the balance between its foul scent and psychoactive potency reaches its peak. For the true connoisseurs who yearn for the maximum expression of its foulness, letting the plant mature till day 86 or 88 is key. Be warned, though – by this time, the smell becomes almost insufferably rank, a true testament to its skunk lineage and a challenge even for the most seasoned of enthusiasts.
Both the ’79 and the ’81 are EXCEPTIONAL representations of a long-gone era, with the ’79 being the FAR MORE OFFENSIVE of the two and more of what I was looking for. Given the age of both, I think the S1’s and the crosses (I crossed both of them to each other) are going to put a BIG SMILE on a lot of old grower’s faces
I’m excited to help reintroduce these legendary strains back into the modern cannabis landscape and to a new generation of growers. It’s not just about the nostalgia or the pursuit of a long-lost aroma, it’s about reconnecting with a piece of history, a time when cannabis culture was in its formative stages, and each strain had its own story. The Florida Heirloom Skunks are more than just plants; they’re a living piece of the past, a testament to the rich and varied history of cannabis. With the rediscovery of roadkill skunk, we don’t just get a chance to experience its unique aroma; we have the opportunity to revive a part of our culture that was almost forgotten.
A friend is currently growing out both the ’81 and the ’79 and commented:
“I’m running several 1979 & 1981 heirloom skunk plants, and right hand to god my driveway is 375 feet – 465 feet to my mailbox and I can smell that shit before getting out of my truck to get the mail (and i am running double carbon filters. I love that stinky shit, even if I occasionally gag from the sour-rotten-egg ,baby shit, ammonia, and 7 day old skunk roadkill.”


Photo of 79 Heirloom Skunk.

I will say. This does look like what we had back from 79-1984, when a rat, ratted out my buddy who was growing it.
What he had, was Narrow Leaf, and was done LATE, Outside. Last of October. And the plants got big.

These take 84-88 days to finish.

Bad thing is, I wont be able to grow them, any time soon.

View attachment 2124695
View attachment 2124696

View attachment 2124697
Ah, the nostalgia of “skunk weed” from the 80s and 90s is a tale that resonates with cannabis connoisseurs and enthusiasts alike. “Roadkill Skunk”, known for its pungent funk reeking of skunk spray, has become somewhat of a legend in the cannabis community. Its distinctive terpene profile, characterized by a strong, skunky smell, was a hallmark of high-quality weed during that era. For some, the acrid odor of burning sulfur was enough to make your eyes water if you stood too close to the plant. Outdoors with a nice breeze, you could smell dead skunk from over a mile away.
During the dark ages of prohibition, however, strong smelling weed was exactly the sort of thing that would get cultivators busted and even if you were running a couple of carbon filters, it wasn’t enough to cover up the smell. Growers were drawn to strains with little to no smell in flower and, as the years passed, the noxious skunk spray odor seemed to just disappear, almost as if it were a relic of a bygone era. For more than a decade, the smell of roadkill skunk has been the subject of relentless pursuit by growers and users alike, each yearning to recapture that nostalgic essence.
The skunk weed of the 80s and 90s was not just known for its smell; it was a symbol of the counterculture movement, a physical representation of rebellion and freedom. Its aroma filled the air at concerts, festivals, and in the backrooms of underground clubs. The potent smell was instantly recognizable, and for many, it evoked memories of youth, liberation, and the carefree days of the past. As the cannabis industry evolved, new strains with varied aromas and effects emerged, and the classic skunk scent became a rarity, much to the dismay of those who longed for the nostalgia it brought.
The quest for the original skunk weed has been like searching for a treasure feared lost forever. Growers have scoured seed banks, exchanged cuttings, and experimented with crossbreeding in hopes of rediscovering the skunky aroma. Despite their efforts, the exact terpene profile remained elusive, leaving a yearning in the hearts of the old stoners who remembered it wistfully.
But after years of dead ends and “sweet” terps, there seems to be good news on the horizon for those chasing the olfactory ghost of the roadkill skunk. The recent release of the ‘79 and the ’81 Florida Heirloom Skunk clones has sparked excitement within the cannabis community. Held tightly by a breeder with Sunshine Seed Co now in his 70’s, these recently released treasures just may be the missing link that enthusiasts have been lusting for.
As it is described, the ‘79 Florida Heirloom Skunk stands out not just for its growth and potency, but for its remarkably offensive odor, a pungent assault on the senses, a noxious mixture that harkens back to the unmistakable stench of rotting eggs mingled with the sharpness of ammonia. This olfactory experience is so overpowering and repugnant that it’s almost offensive, yet for those who remember, it’s a nostalgic trip back to the days when cannabis had a wild, untamed aroma. While both exhibit the eye-watering bite of sulfur and ammonia – the ’79 really pushes the limit of what the senses can handle and, as stinky as the ’81 is, seems mild in comparison.
The flowering cycle of this heirloom strain spans 84 to 88 days, during which its already potent smell intensifies and evolves. Harvesting around day 81 yields a product with a headier and more stimulating effect, but it’s in the later stages of flowering, particularly around day 84, that the balance between its foul scent and psychoactive potency reaches its peak. For the true connoisseurs who yearn for the maximum expression of its foulness, letting the plant mature till day 86 or 88 is key. Be warned, though – by this time, the smell becomes almost insufferably rank, a true testament to its skunk lineage and a challenge even for the most seasoned of enthusiasts.
Both the ’79 and the ’81 are EXCEPTIONAL representations of a long-gone era, with the ’79 being the FAR MORE OFFENSIVE of the two and more of what I was looking for. Given the age of both, I think the S1’s and the crosses (I crossed both of them to each other) are going to put a BIG SMILE on a lot of old grower’s faces.

I’m excited to help reintroduce these legendary strains back into the modern cannabis landscape and to a new generation of growers. It’s not just about the nostalgia or the pursuit of a long-lost aroma, it’s about reconnecting with a piece of history, a time when cannabis culture was in its formative stages, and each strain had its own story. The Florida Heirloom Skunks are more than just plants; they’re a living piece of the past, a testament to the rich and varied history of cannabis. With the rediscovery of roadkill skunk, we don’t just get a chance to experience its unique aroma; we have the opportunity to revive a part of our culture that was almost forgotten.
A friend is currently growing out both the ’81 and the ’79 and commented:
“I’m running several 1979 & 1981 heirloom skunk plants, and right hand to god my driveway is 375 feet – 465 feet to my mailbox and I can smell that shit before getting out of my truck to get the mail (and i am running double carbon filters. I love that stinky shit, even if I occasionally gag from the sour-rotten-egg ,baby shit, ammonia, and 7 day old skunk roadkill.”




Southern Super Skunk (Holiday release)
Lineage: 1979 Skunk X 1981 Skunk
Flowering: 12-14 Weeks
Height: Medium-Tall
Smell/ Flavor: Sulphur, ammonia, pine, decaying organic matter
Description:
In the skunk projects saga, we had our breeders take our 1979 heirloom Florida skunk clone and mate it with the only old school skunk we had seeds of. After so very attentive pressure popping we were able to get seeds from the 1980’s to pop and thrive. With all hopes on a stellar male, after hoarding the seeds for decades the move was to very carefully pop and find a new 1981 male. Out of the handful of seeds we were able to get a new 1981 skunk male.
It seemed like something that needed to be done, if only for the sake of making the cross. To see what these two different flavor profiles would combine to make. I’m proper fashion we did our 60 pheno run of these seeds. Everything that came out seemed to have bits from each parent.
The sulphur stench from 79, the strong ammo is from 81 with their combined structures it worked out perfectly. More vigorous than the parents, and you will get a bit of swap to one side or the other but they’re slight differences. We did end up with a sulphur, ammonia, sage and spicy mint out of a single female from the original 60 pheno hunt from these F1’s.
It’s a bit of a combination of the nasty meets the nasty. They will all branch out, they will get tall if allowed but it’s not hard to SOG them in 5gals, drip drain to waste and flower them after about 8 days veg. They do take longer to finish in most cases. They will stretch and branch out. Taking the height and width requirements of your garden may mean you want to flower sooner or if you have ample space or are outdoors you may want to get them as large as possible.
The water temps are something you’ll want to keep consistent. She doesn’t like fluctuations in water temp rapid changes. You need to slowly build up the nutes much like old sativas require for the most part. Once they get large they will go through a substantial amount of water/reservoir. In a situation like drip drain to waste, adjustable drippers are favorable as they do tend to feed more than other sativas we have in with her. You will want to plan for 14 weeks of flower, but a few phenos did end up being 11-12 weeks.
Varietal type: Hybrid
Gender: Regular
Flowering: >80 days
Yield: High
Height: Tall

View attachment 2124692
That 79' skunk sounds exactly like what I want. The old school Train-wreck that I grew almost 20 years ago had that exact same "Sulphur, Ammonia, Pine" vibe that this one is claimed to have. It was borderline offensive smelling and amazing. This 79' sounds very similar in the description. 🤘
 
shaganja

shaganja

1,431
263
Nothing is ahead.

Circumstance, prohibits growing anything at this moment. But I wasnt going to let the genetics, get away.

Ive got a ton, of seeds on tap.

I did just give a buddy, an original pack, of Reeferman Willie Nelson, and 2 have popped. Out of 4. Shells are really hard. Hes going to start the other 6, and may already have. Hes in Cali. Im in Ky. A very, unfriendly state.
Hes trying to do a seed increase.
Oh man, love this genetic. Ran black Willie from reeferman. (Vietnamese bx.) Look for this leaner if you like focused sativas. The other side is the nepalese highland. Very relaxing. Cbd types. Reeferman has this pheno for sale in seed form too. She is easy to see also. She is one big stalk. And xmas branches coming up. Wind doesn't blow her over. And the vietnamese black is willowy, like o.g. kush types. Word is Willie Nelson really likes the focused vietnamese buzz. If it's over smoked, the focus become kinda trippy. Like too much focus and you see through the facade, into the real world. Lol
 
plumsmooth

plumsmooth

273
63
IS the Florida 70 year old who's been like 70's for the last 10+ years a scammer or is the Rotten Skunk Dying Roadside Pudrid Stentching sulfur rotten egg pheno's smell for a Mile away while pinhing your nose for real?

like wow mannnnnnnnnnn let me get some of that 79 hair-loom spray
 
1diesel1

1diesel1

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Is that the 79 from Katsu?
Yes, so is the heirloom skunk, I inquired on the availability of the 79 in the future, they were out of stock in the store.
I purchased the 81 skunk and was sent 6 freebies of 79 regulars.
He said there will be another drop in 6 months. He’s also working on a clone store.
Good people!!
I highly recommend:)
 
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