Ya thanks a lot slap, I just ordered some 7 gallon buckets and 600 micron filters as well. Things look sweet. So you guys recommend adding all tea ingredients directly into the vortex no tea bag? If so my microherd has been suffering for months..
 
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Ya thanks a lot slap, I just ordered some 7 gallon buckets and 600 micron filters as well. Things look sweet. So you guys recommend adding all tea ingredients directly into the vortex no tea bag? If so my microherd has been suffering for months..
I just throw everything in, no bag. I tried a bag once but it seemed to mess with the vortex a little. Just make sure your using at least 3/4 of larger PVC tubing or it may clog. That happened to me using 1/2 inch on an early design and had tea all over the fucking place:banghead:.

Good luck Hooked

Slap
 
Sweet, my PVC is 1.5" so I'm just gonna throw it all in. I read somewhere it's better because the vortex evenly distributes and suspends whatever material you put in it therefore leeching more nutrients out of your material into the water. Dunno if this is true, I need to invest in a better microscope one of these days.
 

DoobieDuck

Premium Member
Supporter
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...but with size pump i'm using on that size bucket i would hope that it is feeding more than enough oxogen to the water...Slap
Slap I'm not sure if my flowers need tea or not but I'm going to do this this year. I've been researching all over the place, if you don't mind I'll add a youtube link I thought was very good:

..your set up seems to make snese and the best blue print for my small needs, thanks everyone so much for posting. Great work..DD
 
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@Seamaiden NOt sure if you ever made a brewer, but I got a cone shaped 15gal tank if your in need. Too small for me now.

So lots of people talking what is and isn't best for a brewer, and what can go wrong with teas. However not one picture of a culture slide. That is why I love Microbeman, everything he says is backed by video footage and years of testing. All these people claiming you should add guanos and ferts are just making a nutrient tea. If we are talking microbial multiplication, then all you need is molasses and quality compost. I can prove it with culture samples.

@squiggly You seem to be down a little on bucket style brewers, because they have dead spots that create anaerobic zones. You also mention when this is the case, not to run your brew longer than a couple days, because the anaerobic zones will take over your tea. I agree with everything, but I have some questions.

1. With high dissolved oxygen rates, how long would this take to occur at 70f?

2. Would this happen quicker at 100f?

3. Can you beat the anaerobic zones by having bubbles everywhere? I know the vortex hits every spot (theoretically) of the brewer, there for delivering oxygen to all the water. However, my brewer has an airlift to help fuse oxygen into the water, and two high power bubblers on the bottom of a 55 gallon brewer. That's 140watts of bubble and it is all bubble when it's turned on. I have been making teas in weather that is 90+ during the day, and after a quick sample under the slide, I can see the tea is full of fungal hyphae and flagellate with very little harmful fungi and/or anaerobic microorganisms after about 36-42 hours. Hot days like this I keep it to 36 hours.

In theory, I have heard above 80 degrees you have trouble keeping dissolved oxygen up, and brews go bad. However, I have yet to experience this with my brewer.

4. Can you shed some light on why my brewer seems to put out quality teas even in conditions that I have been told are undesirable?

Thanks for your time.
 

Seamaiden

Living dead girl
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@Seamaiden NOt sure if you ever made a brewer, but I got a cone shaped 15gal tank if your in need. Too small for me now.
I did, and the trash can the aeration system was configured for has temporarily been coopted. We should talk! A lot of aquaponic cats are using brewed teas to feed their systems.
 
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